famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

For My Lover, Returning To His Wife Analysis



Author: poem of Anne Sexton Type: poem Views: 18



She is all there.

She was melted carefully down for you

and cast up from your childhood,

cast up from your one hundred favorite aggies.


She has always been there, my darling.

She is, in fact, exquisite.

Fireworks in the dull middle of February

and as real as a cast-iron pot.


Let's face it, I have been momentary.

vA luxury. A bright red sloop in the harbor.

My hair rising like smoke from the car window.

Littleneck clams out of season.


She is more than that. She is your have to have,

has grown you your practical your tropical growth.

This is not an experiment. She is all harmony.

She sees to oars and oarlocks for the dinghy,


has placed wild flowers at the window at breakfast,

sat by the potter's wheel at midday,

set forth three children under the moon,

three cherubs drawn by Michelangelo,


done this with her legs spread out

in the terrible months in the chapel.

If you glance up, the children are there

like delicate balloons resting on the ceiling.


She has also carried each one down the hall

after supper, their heads privately bent,

two legs protesting, person to person,

her face flushed with a song and their little sleep.


I give you back your heart.

I give you permission --


for the fuse inside her, throbbing

angrily in the dirt, for the bitch in her

and the burying of her wound --

for the burying of her small red wound alive --


for the pale flickering flare under her ribs,

for the drunken sailor who waits in her left pulse,

for the mother's knee, for the stocking,

for the garter belt, for the call --


the curious call

when you will burrow in arms and breasts

and tug at the orange ribbon in her hair

and answer the call, the curious call.


She is so naked and singular

She is the sum of yourself and your dream.

Climb her like a monument, step after step.

She is solid.


As for me, I am a watercolor.

I wash off.

Sponsor


122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




.: :.

This poem shows an in depth image of the female heart, the difference between love to men and love to women, as the mistress needs more than just sex to sustain her, while the husband is fine with the \'luxury\' of having her. I agree that it also is an insightfull representation of the typical love triangle. However with a depressing realisation that the mistress was nothing more than \'smoke rising from a car window\'. I really love this poem i think it is very honest, a raw representation of the human heart

| Posted on 2011-05-19 | by a guest


.: :.

In the poem Anne Sexton is essientially setting her lover free. She\'s telling hiim to go back to his perfect wife and family. She has no say in making the lover stay even if she wants him to. She was just a temporary interest and a temporary thrill but, inevitabley all good things come to an end

| Posted on 2011-03-02 | by a guest


.: :.

she lost a man she thought she cudnt match up to his wife . But then she discovered it wasnt her, it was him. He was just like his cheating wife. essentially , she lost her soul n her spirit when she identified her self as only temporary, whilst her lover associated his wife, with all her positives and negatives, as solid.

| Posted on 2010-12-16 | by a guest


.: :.

she lost a man she thought she cudnt match up to his wife . But then she discovered it wasnt her, it was him. He was just like his cheating wife. essentially , she lost her soul n her spirit when she identified her self as only temporary, whilst her lover associated his wife, with all her positives and negatives, as solid.

| Posted on 2010-12-16 | by a guest


.: :.

I disagree completely. This poem has nothing to do with an inability to keep a lover or low self-confidence. Nor do I believe that it shifts blame onto the husband or implies a weakness on his part. Anne Sexton, in this poem, is showing the different roles between the mistress and the wife. The wife is the person to whom the husband goes home...the woman who takes care of him, who bore his children and cares for them, who ultimately holds his heart. The mistress is simply a fleeting luxury...someone who will not be there forever. In this poem, she removes herself from the equation and gives the husband permission to solely care for his wife. "I am a watercolor. I wash off" doesn't refer to a lack of self-confidence, it refers to the temporary nature of being a mistress.

| Posted on 2010-06-09 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem does not describe low self-confidence. Rather it is written in a pragmatic voice from the other woman shifting blame on where it belongs: the cheating husband. This poem is her reflection on the deep hurt his carelessness has. She is removing her affection for this man, giving him back all emotional ties - to the affect that they were "borrowed" and she did not intend on keeping him from what he started with his wife. She is recognizing the wife's contribution and the wife's subdued anger - the wife's passiveness and therefore her position as a doormat in her husband's eyes. And the narrator is then saying goodbye, allowing herself to wash away from the situation like watercolor, and leave the man, that weak man, to figure out his stability on the concrete that was once his marriage. I think it's beautifully done.

| Posted on 2009-07-13 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this poem is rather jolly.
I would love to read it again,but it is just too hot.

| Posted on 2009-07-02 | by a guest


.: :.

Her ending of
"I am a watercolour. I wash off". Is a metaphor showing the lack of confidence she has in her self. Sexton battled depression and it is Her Lover, her psychiatrist, to whom she is talking about. She was a woman in a time when women were just getting on their feet. In the poem she speaks of how Her Lover and his wife are right for each other. That he still loves the wife, finds passion in being with the wife and has had perfect (angelic) children with the wife. She knows he will not leave his wife for her, so she accepts this with the sentence, "i give you permission-". I believe Sexton, a feminist of her time, hated the thought of her happiness being in a mans hands. She took her oppitunity and though still held feelings for him, left him before he could do so to her. He still had his wife, his have to have, for she is solid and remains by him faithfully. Yet Sexton acknowledged herself as being no more than momentary, A watercolour.

| Posted on 2009-04-26 | by a guest


.: :.

The simple truth is that she was having an affair with her psychiatrist and he returned to his wife. I love the end: I am water colour. I wash off. I totally get this poem it got me through a moment when I was younger and even now (same person) but that isn't the point. I love it cos it is what it is: denying the fact that you don't want this person to leave but also knowing that it's inevitable. He isn't going to leave his wife and kids for you. Yup, I love this poem.

| Posted on 2009-03-05 | by a guest


.: :.

i think the lover is a priest, and the wife is the "Church" or God.

| Posted on 2008-07-27 | by a guest


.: Anne Sexton :.

This poem is about the speakers inability to keep her lover. The speaker is comparing herself to things that are temporary, luxury, littleneck clams, smoke rising from the car window. These are all fleeting things. They can go away quickly. The poem is about her dealing with the fact he will NEVER leave his wife for her, and that she may feel she is not as good when compared to his wife. The "bright red sloop" = A boat that is pretty but is temporary, it will sail away. "Hair rising like smoke" = She is forgotten as quickly as smoke goes out a car window.

| Posted on 2008-02-24 | by a guest


.: :.

can someone help me.. i have no idea what the real indepth meaning of this poem is, and i don't understand the metaphors either. Is the lover making the guy go back to his wife or has he made that descison and she is reasuring him it is right? Do him and his wife have children, beacuse i don't understand the cherubs idea.
what do these lines mean?
bright red sloop in the harbor.
My hair rising like smoke from the car window.

| Posted on 2008-02-23 | by a guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

For My Lover, Returning To His Wife Analysis Anne Sexton critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. For My Lover, Returning To His Wife Analysis Anne Sexton Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation online education meaning metaphors symbolism characterization itunes. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique For My Lover, Returning To His Wife Analysis Anne Sexton itunes audio book mp4 mp3



Poetry 22
Poetry 125
Poetry 1
Poetry 176
Poetry 152
Poetry 83
Poetry 22
Poetry 171
Poetry 201
Poetry 177
Poetry 56
Poetry 79
Poetry 108
Poetry 41
Poetry 208
Poetry 139
Poetry 143
Poetry 82
Poetry 27
Poetry 42