famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

Sonnet 122: Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain Analysis



Author: poem of William Shakespeare Type: poem Views: 32

Sponsored Links


Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain
Full charactered with lasting memory,
Which shall above that idle rank remain
Beyond all date even to eternity—
Or at the least, so long as brain and heart
Have faculty by nature to subsist;
Till each to razed oblivion yield his part
Of thee, thy record never can be missed.
That poor retention could not so much hold,
Nor need I tallies thy dear love to score;
Therefore to give them from me was I bold,
To trust those tables that receive thee more.
    To keep an adjunct to remember thee
    Were to import forgetfulness in me.

Sponsor



Learn to Play Songs by Ear: Ear Training

122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




.: :.

Sonnet 122 is part of the “Fair Youth” sequence of sonnets (Sonnets 1-126). While the main point is about a diary for the old, it can be read deeper that it is really about the annoyance that the speaker gives off from receiving this gift. His lack of appreciation is apparent, and can be easily seen. The two main reasons for him not wanting the gift are the possibility of scandal and the reliance on the gift. It can easily be seen that he was not appreciative at all for this gift that the youth gave him.
The term “table," used throughout, is another term for notebook or diary. And in the first line he explains to the youth that he remembers everything in the diary that they are trying to give him. This diary is the gift. In sonnet seventy-seven, he gives the youth a diary as a gift, on what it's like to be old, so they know what to expect. Here, the youth is trying to repay that by giving him a diary. However he doesn't want it, he is unappreciative of it. He doesn't want (or need) this diary as he remembers vividly what being youthful was like, which is why he is telling them all the time not to make the same mistakes he did. If he were to accept this diary, he would become reliant on it, and dull what he actually remembers, which he doesn't want to happen. He wouldn't be able to give good advice for the youth if he can only remember what the youth told him in the diary. No doubt, the youth only told him the good things in this gift, which aren't helpful when giving advice. He is unappreciative of the gift, here it seems, for its lack of use.
One of the most egotistical lines in all of the “Fair Youth” sonnets is the last two lines of Sonnet 122. “To keep an adjunct to remember thee / Were to import forgetfulness in thee” (Shakespeare). What he is saying is that if he were caught using the notebook that the youth gave him, he might be called a hypocrite. This is because he knows very well what it is like to be part of the youth. To use a notebook would be rather unfair to the youth as he would be “cheating,” after using all these sonnets as reminders and instructions to them. That and it would be useless for him to use it since he already knows what it's like. Giving advice to someone who gave you the information in the first place creates this circular roundabout of errors. Not only this but relying on something the youth gave him (which has told them multiple times that they were wrong on other things), could create some sort of scandal or irritation from others. Because of this possibility of a scandal revolving around this, he would not be appreciative of something such as a gift like this.
It is natural for humans to not fully appreciate the gifts that are given, but to throw it out immediately is rude to the giving party, regardless of how unappreciative the receiver is. The speaker here throws out the gift almost immediately. While he may not need or want this gift, it is good to show some thanks for what you have received. Perhaps an explanation would be more comforting to the youth before he throws it out, not after. It is understandable why one wouldn't want to rely on such things a diary, especially when he is giving instruction, but he doesn't have to use it, just to accept it.

| Posted on 2015-12-15 | by a guest


.: :.

.The poem is about a youth being givena notebook as a gift, but the youth claims he does not need one to remember his friend, and it would make him seem forgetful.

| Posted on 2012-11-21 | by a guest


.: :.

.The poem is about a youth being givena notebook as a gift, but the youth claims he does not need one to remember his friend, and it would make him seem forgetful.

| Posted on 2012-11-21 | by a guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

Sonnet 122: Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain Analysis William Shakespeare critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Sonnet 122: Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain Analysis William Shakespeare Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation online education meaning metaphors symbolism characterization itunes. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Sonnet 122: Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain Analysis William Shakespeare itunes audio book mp4 mp3



Poetry 169
Poetry 11
Poetry 17
Poetry 43
Poetry 7
Poetry 82
Poetry 210
Poetry 201
Poetry 194
Poetry 109
Poetry 71
Poetry 200
Poetry 4
Poetry 169
Poetry 146
Poetry 63
Poetry 148
Poetry 6
Poetry 206
Poetry 141