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Sonnet 43 - How do I love thee? Let me count the ways Analysis



Author: poem of Elizabeth Barrett Browning Type: poem Views: 216


XLIII

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday's
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




.: :.

Theme: Intense Love
\"Sonnet 43\" expresses the poet�s intense love for her husband-to-be, Robert Browning. So intense is her love for him, she says, that it rises to the spiritual level (Lines 3 and 4). She loves him freely, without coercion; she loves him purely, without expectation of personal gain. She even loves him with an intensity of the suffering (passion: Line 9) resembling that of Christ on the cross, and she loves him in the way that she loved saints as a child. Moreover, she expects to continue to love him after death.
Figures of Speech
The dominant figure of speech in the poem is anaphora�the use of I love thee in eight lines and I shall but love thee in the final line. This repetition builds rhythm while reinforcing the theme. Browning also uses alliteration, as follows:
thee, the (Lines 1, 2, 5, 9, 12).
thee, they (Line 8)
soul, sight (Line 3)
love, level (Line 5)
quiet, candle-light (Line 6)
freely, strive, Right (Line 7)
purely, Praise (Line 8)
passion, put (Line 9)
griefs, faith (Line 10)
my, my (Line 10)
love, love (Line 11)
With, with (Line 12)
lost, love (Line 12)
lost, saints (Line 12)
Smiles, tears (Line 13) (z sound)
smiles, all, life (Line 13)
shall, love (Line 14)
but, better (Line 14)
but, better, after (Line 14)
Sonnet 43
By Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Published in 1850
-
.
Text of the Poem Annotations
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. thee: the poet\'s husband, Robert Browning
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height depth, breadth: internal rhyme
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight when . . . Grace: when my soul feels its way into the spiritual realm
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace. (out of sight) to find the goal of being alive and living uprightly
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s I love you enough to meet all of your simple needs during the
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. day (sun) and even during the night (candle-light)
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; freely: willingly�and just as intensely as men who fight for freedom
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise. purely: genuinely, without desire for praise
I love thee with the passion put to use with an intensity equal to that experienced during suffering or
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith. mourning; I love you with the blind faith of a child
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose with . . . saints: with a childlike fervor for saints and holiness that I
With my lost saints!�I love thee with the breath, seemed to lose when I grew older. breath: echoes breadth, Line 2
Smiles, tears, of all my life!�and, if God choose, Smiles . . . life: perhaps too sentimental
I shall but love thee better after death. their love is eternal, never ending
.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

Theme: Intense Love
\"Sonnet 43\" expresses the poet�s intense love for her husband-to-be, Robert Browning. So intense is her love for him, she says, that it rises to the spiritual level (Lines 3 and 4). She loves him freely, without coercion; she loves him purely, without expectation of personal gain. She even loves him with an intensity of the suffering (passion: Line 9) resembling that of Christ on the cross, and she loves him in the way that she loved saints as a child. Moreover, she expects to continue to love him after death.
Figures of Speech
The dominant figure of speech in the poem is anaphora�the use of I love thee in eight lines and I shall but love thee in the final line. This repetition builds rhythm while reinforcing the theme. Browning also uses alliteration, as follows:
thee, the (Lines 1, 2, 5, 9, 12).
thee, they (Line 8)
soul, sight (Line 3)
love, level (Line 5)
quiet, candle-light (Line 6)
freely, strive, Right (Line 7)
purely, Praise (Line 8)
passion, put (Line 9)
griefs, faith (Line 10)
my, my (Line 10)
love, love (Line 11)
With, with (Line 12)
lost, love (Line 12)
lost, saints (Line 12)
Smiles, tears (Line 13) (z sound)
smiles, all, life (Line 13)
shall, love (Line 14)
but, better (Line 14)
but, better, after (Line 14)
Sonnet 43
By Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Published in 1850
-
.
Text of the Poem Annotations
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. thee: the poet\'s husband, Robert Browning
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height depth, breadth: internal rhyme
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight when . . . Grace: when my soul feels its way into the spiritual realm
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace. (out of sight) to find the goal of being alive and living uprightly
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s I love you enough to meet all of your simple needs during the
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. day (sun) and even during the night (candle-light)
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; freely: willingly�and just as intensely as men who fight for freedom
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise. purely: genuinely, without desire for praise
I love thee with the passion put to use with an intensity equal to that experienced during suffering or
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith. mourning; I love you with the blind faith of a child
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose with . . . saints: with a childlike fervor for saints and holiness that I
With my lost saints!�I love thee with the breath, seemed to lose when I grew older. breath: echoes breadth, Line 2
Smiles, tears, of all my life!�and, if God choose, Smiles . . . life: perhaps too sentimental
I shall but love thee better after death. their love is eternal, never ending

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

Theme: Intense Love
\"Sonnet 43\" expresses the poet�s intense love for her husband-to-be, Robert Browning. So intense is her love for him, she says, that it rises to the spiritual level (Lines 3 and 4). She loves him freely, without coercion; she loves him purely, without expectation of personal gain. She even loves him with an intensity of the suffering (passion: Line 9) resembling that of Christ on the cross, and she loves him in the way that she loved saints as a child. Moreover, she expects to continue to love him after death.
Figures of Speech
The dominant figure of speech in the poem is anaphora�the use of I love thee in eight lines and I shall but love thee in the final line. This repetition builds rhythm while reinforcing the theme. Browning also uses alliteration, as follows:
thee, the (Lines 1, 2, 5, 9, 12).
thee, they (Line 8)
soul, sight (Line 3)
love, level (Line 5)
quiet, candle-light (Line 6)
freely, strive, Right (Line 7)
purely, Praise (Line 8)
passion, put (Line 9)
griefs, faith (Line 10)
my, my (Line 10)
love, love (Line 11)
With, with (Line 12)
lost, love (Line 12)
lost, saints (Line 12)
Smiles, tears (Line 13) (z sound)
smiles, all, life (Line 13)
shall, love (Line 14)
but, better (Line 14)
but, better, after (Line 14)
Sonnet 43
By Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Published in 1850
-
.
Text of the Poem Annotations
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. thee: the poet\'s husband, Robert Browning
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height depth, breadth: internal rhyme
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight when . . . Grace: when my soul feels its way into the spiritual realm
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace. (out of sight) to find the goal of being alive and living uprightly
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s I love you enough to meet all of your simple needs during the
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. day (sun) and even during the night (candle-light)
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; freely: willingly�and just as intensely as men who fight for freedom
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise. purely: genuinely, without desire for praise
I love thee with the passion put to use with an intensity equal to that experienced during suffering or
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith. mourning; I love you with the blind faith of a child
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose with . . . saints: with a childlike fervor for saints and holiness that I
With my lost saints!�I love thee with the breath, seemed to lose when I grew older. breath: echoes breadth, Line 2
Smiles, tears, of all my life!�and, if God choose, Smiles . . . life: perhaps too sentimental
I shall but love thee better after death. their love is eternal, never ending

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

Theme: Intense Love
\"Sonnet 43\" expresses the poet�s intense love for her husband-to-be, Robert Browning. So intense is her love for him, she says, that it rises to the spiritual level (Lines 3 and 4). She loves him freely, without coercion; she loves him purely, without expectation of personal gain. She even loves him with an intensity of the suffering (passion: Line 9) resembling that of Christ on the cross, and she loves him in the way that she loved saints as a child. Moreover, she expects to continue to love him after death.
Figures of Speech
The dominant figure of speech in the poem is anaphora�the use of I love thee in eight lines and I shall but love thee in the final line. This repetition builds rhythm while reinforcing the theme. Browning also uses alliteration, as follows:
thee, the (Lines 1, 2, 5, 9, 12).
thee, they (Line 8)
soul, sight (Line 3)
love, level (Line 5)
quiet, candle-light (Line 6)
freely, strive, Right (Line 7)
purely, Praise (Line 8)
passion, put (Line 9)
griefs, faith (Line 10)
my, my (Line 10)
love, love (Line 11)
With, with (Line 12)
lost, love (Line 12)
lost, saints (Line 12)
Smiles, tears (Line 13) (z sound)
smiles, all, life (Line 13)
shall, love (Line 14)
but, better (Line 14)
but, better, after (Line 14)
Sonnet 43
By Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Published in 1850
-
.
Text of the Poem Annotations
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. thee: the poet\'s husband, Robert Browning
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height depth, breadth: internal rhyme
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight when . . . Grace: when my soul feels its way into the spiritual realm
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace. (out of sight) to find the goal of being alive and living uprightly
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s I love you enough to meet all of your simple needs during the
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. day (sun) and even during the night (candle-light)
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; freely: willingly�and just as intensely as men who fight for freedom
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise. purely: genuinely, without desire for praise
I love thee with the passion put to use with an intensity equal to that experienced during suffering or
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith. mourning; I love you with the blind faith of a child
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose with . . . saints: with a childlike fervor for saints and holiness that I
With my lost saints!�I love thee with the breath, seemed to lose when I grew older. breath: echoes breadth, Line 2
Smiles, tears, of all my life!�and, if God choose, Smiles . . . life: perhaps too sentimental
I shall but love thee better after death. their love is eternal, never ending

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

Theme: Intense Love
\"Sonnet 43\" expresses the poet�s intense love for her husband-to-be, Robert Browning. So intense is her love for him, she says, that it rises to the spiritual level (Lines 3 and 4). She loves him freely, without coercion; she loves him purely, without expectation of personal gain. She even loves him with an intensity of the suffering (passion: Line 9) resembling that of Christ on the cross, and she loves him in the way that she loved saints as a child. Moreover, she expects to continue to love him after death.
Figures of Speech
The dominant figure of speech in the poem is anaphora�the use of I love thee in eight lines and I shall but love thee in the final line. This repetition builds rhythm while reinforcing the theme. Browning also uses alliteration, as follows:
thee, the (Lines 1, 2, 5, 9, 12).
thee, they (Line 8)
soul, sight (Line 3)
love, level (Line 5)
quiet, candle-light (Line 6)
freely, strive, Right (Line 7)
purely, Praise (Line 8)
passion, put (Line 9)
griefs, faith (Line 10)
my, my (Line 10)
love, love (Line 11)
With, with (Line 12)
lost, love (Line 12)
lost, saints (Line 12)
Smiles, tears (Line 13) (z sound)
smiles, all, life (Line 13)
shall, love (Line 14)
but, better (Line 14)
but, better, after (Line 14)
Sonnet 43
By Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Published in 1850
-
.
Text of the Poem Annotations
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. thee: the poet\'s husband, Robert Browning
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height depth, breadth: internal rhyme
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight when . . . Grace: when my soul feels its way into the spiritual realm
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace. (out of sight) to find the goal of being alive and living uprightly
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s I love you enough to meet all of your simple needs during the
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. day (sun) and even during the night (candle-light)
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; freely: willingly�and just as intensely as men who fight for freedom
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise. purely: genuinely, without desire for praise
I love thee with the passion put to use with an intensity equal to that experienced during suffering or
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith. mourning; I love you with the blind faith of a child
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose with . . . saints: with a childlike fervor for saints and holiness that I
With my lost saints!�I love thee with the breath, seemed to lose when I grew older. breath: echoes breadth, Line 2
Smiles, tears, of all my life!�and, if God choose, Smiles . . . life: perhaps too sentimental
I shall but love thee better after death. their love is eternal, never ending

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

.How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

.How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday\'s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood\'s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

i can say that the poem tells that no one/nothing can stops elizabeth to love his huband even death...her intense love shows that love is immeasurable in other words endless love..she showed and expressed her love through many ways.

| Posted on 2010-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

--how do i love thee--well were going tuckle this sonnet next tuesday--so i think i can really understand it--but for now after reading this sonnet...i can say that those previews comments are true--that..its all about---ENDELSS LOVE--.

| Posted on 2010-11-26 | by a guest


.: :.

--how do i love thee--well were going tuckle this sonnet next tuesday--so i think i can really understand it--but for now after reading this sonnet...i can say that those previews comments are true--that..its all about---ENDELSS LOVE--.

| Posted on 2010-11-26 | by a guest


.: :.

i dont understand this poem not one bit. would sum1 lik to help melo lol

| Posted on 2010-08-25 | by a guest


.: :.

i love this poem it reminds me of me and my lover!!!

| Posted on 2010-04-20 | by a guest


.: :.

i love this poem it reminds me of me and my lover!!!

| Posted on 2010-04-20 | by a guest


.: :.

I love this poem so much .. it shows the true meaning of love .. Sonnet 43 is very inspiring ..
Posted by : Alyssa Marie Dolor

| Posted on 2010-01-31 | by a guest


.: :.

This is simply graceful. The confession is honest and down to earth. The lover leaves almost no options outside her counting. The true nature of an earthly love is revealed ending with the hope of it's eternal survival. The words are very easy to read. No use of jargon. The poem is easy to penetrate though revealing a serious message to its reader. As a reader I feel aligned with the lover's word and feel it's speaking some deep felt truth of my own life.
Tanvir
Jagannath University,
Bangladesh

| Posted on 2009-08-15 | by a guest


.: :.

This is simply graceful. The confession is honest and down to earth. The lover leaves almost no options outside her counting. The true nature of an earthly love is revealed ending with the hope of it's eternal survival. The words are very easy to read. No use of jargon. The poem is easy to penetrate though revealing a serious message to its reader. As a reader I feel aligned with the lover's word and feel it's speaking some deep felt truth of my own life.
Tanvir
Jagannath University,
Bangladesh

| Posted on 2009-08-15 | by a guest


.: :.

I really enjouyed this poem, but I don't understand her reputition.

| Posted on 2009-08-06 | by a guest


.: :.

The poet repeatedly use" i love thee" what does it mean?

| Posted on 2009-02-09 | by a guest


.: :.

the poet is counting the ways by which she love herbeloved and there are so many.Her soul reaches him when she can not see him.She needs him like the day needs the sun, he is her light in a dark day. AT the time slavery ws very common so she loves him as the black people strive for right as in her love is freely given no matter what. The faith she had as a child she finds in him.Nomatter wht she does she will always love him be it breathing,cryin or smiling. She is religous becuse she says 'If God choose, I shall but love thee better after death.'Which means she has faith that God will choose for them to be together and she plans to love him better after death, as in more than what this poem has expressed more than you can love someone in this world and i feel that this is the beauty of it.

| Posted on 2008-12-02 | by a guest


.: :.

I'm majoring in English Literature.
And when i was in 9th grade, i studied this poem.
It's beautiful and touching.
It's a perfect romantic poem.

| Posted on 2008-11-24 | by a guest


.: :.

Theme: Intense Love
"Sonnet 43" expresses the poets intense love for her husband-to-be, Robert Browning. So intense is her love for him, she says, that it rises to the spiritual level (Lines 3 and 4). She loves him freely, without coercion; she loves him purely, without expectation of personal gain. She even loves him with an intensity of the suffering (passion: Line 9) resembling that of Christ on the cross, and she loves him in the way that she loved saints as a child. Moreover, she expects to continue to love him after death.
Figures of Speech
The dominant figure of speech in the poem is anaphorathe use of I love thee in eight lines and I shall but love thee in the final line. This repetition builds rhythm while reinforcing the theme. Browning also uses alliteration, as follows:
thee, the (Lines 1, 2, 5, 9, 12).
thee, they (Line 8)
soul, sight (Line 3)
love, level (Line 5)
quiet, candle-light (Line 6)
freely, strive, Right (Line 7)
purely, Praise (Line 8)
passion, put (Line 9)
griefs, faith (Line 10)
my, my (Line 10)
love, love (Line 11)
With, with (Line 12)
lost, love (Line 12)
lost, saints (Line 12)
Smiles, tears (Line 13) (z sound)
smiles, all, life (Line 13)
shall, love (Line 14)
but, better (Line 14)
but, better, after (Line 14)
Sonnet 43
By Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Published in 1850
-
.
Text of the Poem Annotations

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. thee: the poet's husband, Robert Browning
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height depth, breadth: internal rhyme
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight when . . . Grace: when my soul feels its way into the spiritual realm
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace. (out of sight) to find the goal of being alive and living uprightly
I love thee to the level of everyday's I love you enough to meet all of your simple needs during the
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. day (sun) and even during the night (candle-light)
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; freely: willinglyand just as intensely as men who fight for freedom
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise. purely: genuinely, without desire for praise
I love thee with the passion put to use with an intensity equal to that experienced during suffering or
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith. mourning; I love you with the blind faith of a child
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose with . . . saints: with a childlike fervor for saints and holiness that I
With my lost saints!I love thee with the breath, seemed to lose when I grew older. breath: echoes breadth, Line 2
Smiles, tears, of all my life!and, if God choose, Smiles . . . life: perhaps too sentimental
I shall but love thee better after death. their love is eternal, never ending

| Posted on 2008-11-16 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem shows Elizabeth Barrett Browning's love for her husband Robert Browning. She said that her love for him cannot be measured.And that death can never stop Elizabeth from loving Robert.

| Posted on 2008-09-02 | by a guest


.: :.

could you please tell me if there is any symbolism is this poem?

| Posted on 2008-06-18 | by a guest


.: poetry :.

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday's
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

| Posted on 2008-04-14 | by a guest




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