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Sonnet 55: Not marble, nor the gilded monuments Analysis



Author: poem of William Shakespeare Type: poem Views: 18


Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
Of princes shall outlive this powerful rhyme,
But you shall shine more bright in these contents
Than unswept stone besmeared with sluttish time.
When wasteful war shall statues overturn,
And broils root out the work of masonry,
Nor Mars his sword, nor war's quick fire shall burn
The living record of your memory.
'Gainst death and all-oblivious enmity
Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room
Even in the eyes of all posterity
That wear this world out to the ending doom.
    So, till the judgment that yourself arise,
    You live in this, and dwell in lovers' eyes.

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




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This piece of poetry in terms of my personal view is not exactly as extravagant as it is hailed to be.The poet speaks about how his token of love will withstand the test of time but, actually gives or as i suspect has no clue how this is going to happen.
I respect all the views from people who have contradiction with my views.
Gaurav chakraborty,India.

| Posted on 2012-12-18 | by a guest


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but what ideas of love and friendship are expressed in this sonnet?

| Posted on 2012-11-25 | by a guest


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it would help if u could add lit terms like allusion and allegory or personification
.

| Posted on 2012-09-25 | by a guest


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Thanks so bad for all those analysis!
Great help

| Posted on 2012-09-20 | by a guest


.: :.

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 55 deals with the idea that the subject will be made immortal in these verses, though everything else will be lost through war, “sluttish” time, or other violent forces. Shakespeare elevates poetry as superior, and the only assurance of immortality in this world, but lowers this particular sonnet itself as being unworthy of his subject. Thus, his theme is that everything will be destroyed and forgotten except the subject, who will be praised forever, because they are immortalized in these lines.
The first stanza talks about how time will not destroy the subject, though it shall destroy the world’s most magnificent structures. Thus, poetry is stronger than these structures. The second stanza says that war will not destroy the subject; the third states that the subject will forever be remembered and honored. The couplet sums this up, and also suggests that the subject is love itself. Thus, the thesis of this sonnet is that the subject will be honored forever in the verses, though the verses themselves are unworthy of them.
At the very beginning, Shakespeare suggests that his sonnet is magnificent by using very magnificent comparisons in lines 1-2:
Not marble, nor the gilded monuments ,
Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;
In contrast, he uses the word “rhyme” at the end of line 2, which is often used to signify common and mediocre, even bad, poetry, which suggests that it is the subject of his sonnet that lends magnificence to the verses.
This is only confirmed in lines 3-4:
But you shall shine more bright in these contents
Than unswept stone, besmeared with sluttish time.
Shakespeare comments that his subject will be brighter in his sonnet than an old and dirty stone, again suggesting, by equating his poem with dirt, that his sonnet does not live up to the subject. He likewise calls Time “sluttish”, meaning promiscuous, perhaps in contrast with his subject\'s purity. Also, the reference to stone recalls the structures alluded to in line 1.
Lines 5-6 (a new stanza) begins a new idea:
When wasteful war shall statues overturn
And broils root out the work of masonry,
Shakespeare has so far spoken of two destructive forces: time and war. He is here describing war destroying stone structures, which relates back to the “marble” and “gilded monuments” in line 1, that likewise do not last.
Lines 7-8 continue the war theme:
Nor Mars his sword nor war’s quick fire shall burn
The living record of your memory.
These lines talk of more war, and how it shall not destroy the poem. \" Mars his sword\" is a possessive, using the his genitive . “Living” contrasts with the destruction of the non-living structures in lines 1 and 5-6, meaning that the subject lends not only magnificence, but a living soul to these verses.
The next stanza does not talk about survival, but of human appreciation. He continues to praise his subject:
‘Gainst death and all-oblivious enmity
Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room
Even in the eyes of all posterity
That wear this world out to the ending doom.
There is still a suggestion of survival, but survival of human appreciation, and not of the verse itself. “Doom” refers to Judgement Day, suggesting in the context of the rest of the poem that this poetic record of his subject will survive, and be praised, to the end of time. The slight deviation of the meter in the words “Even in” creates emphasis for this permanency.
The ending couplet is a summary of the survival theme:
So ‘till the judgement that yourself arise,
You live in this, and dwell in lovers’ eyes.
The couplet not only summarizes the rest of the sonnet, but also seems to contradict itself. “Judgement” goes with the talk of Judgement Day in the last stanza, and implies that the subject is alive and will be judged on that day, but “dwelling in lovers’ eyes” suggests that the subject is love itself. Thus, Shakespeare seems to consider the subject so lovely that he is a personification of Love, which cannot be conquered and to which no poetry can do justice...
THIS IS ALL SIMPLY UNDERSTOOD BUT WHO IS \"YOU\" GUYS?

| Posted on 2012-06-29 | by a guest


.: :.

\"Not marble, nor the gilded monuments / Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;\"
Statues and monuments will not last as long as this poem;
\"But you shall shine more bright in these contents / Than unswept stone, besmear\'d with sluttish time.\"
And you will last longer, immortalized in this poem, than the stone statues and monuments, which will fade and become dusty over time.
\"When wasteful war shall statues overturn, / And broils root out the work of masonry,\"
War and other disturbances will destroy statues and monuments,
\"Nor Mars his sword, nor war\'s quick fire shall burn / The living record of your memory.\"
But poetry, which memorializes you, cannot be destroyed by these means.
\"\'Gainst death, and all oblivious enmity / Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room\"
You shall outlast death and all other forces that seek to destroy things
\"Even in the eyes of all posterity / That wear this world out to the ending doom.\"
Even for future generations.
\"So, till the judgment that yourself arise, / You live in this, and dwell in lovers\' eyes.\"
So you will live in this poem until judgment day.

| Posted on 2011-10-04 | by a guest


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thanx about ll the analyzing
tara from baghdad

| Posted on 2010-12-20 | by a guest


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I just have a reccomendation especialy for alaa in cali4nia
please...
When you analysis the poem please add a theme and figure of speech
awara in koya uni....
My regard

| Posted on 2010-05-23 | by a guest


.: :.

I just have a reccomendation especialy for alaa in cali4nia
please...
When you analysis the poem please add a theme and figure of speech

| Posted on 2010-05-23 | by a guest


.: :.

please I want to know how to write an essay about a drama or a poem or any literature element , as undelining the name of the drama..
so please can u help me in this?
thanks alot..

| Posted on 2010-01-24 | by a guest


.: :.

Analysis :
In “Sonnet 55,” the speaker of the poem claims that his “powerful rhyme” will outlast “marble” and “gilded monuments,” keeping the youth’s memory alive until the Last Judgement. As in many of Shakespeare’s sonnets, the passage of time is a major theme in “Sonnet 55.” Time is portrayed predominantly as a negative force connected with death and decay. Line 3, for example, personifies time as a “sluttish” character who “besmears” human attempts to achieve immortality by building stone monuments. The poem reflects a common view during the Elizabethan age that the entire world was in a process of gradual decay and decline as humanity moved through time toward the Last Judgment — the Judeo-Christian idea of apocalypse and an end of time.
“Sonnet 55” is predominantly concerned the human desire to be remembered and immortalized in an attempt to overcome death. The poem suggests a strong awareness of the inevitability of death; images of the aging effects of time and the destructive results of “wasteful war” are emphasized. Worse than death, suggests “Sonnet 55,” are the forces that conspire to insure that an individual is forgotten, such as “war’s quick fire” and the “all oblivious enmity” of other people. The anxiety running throughout the poem is not merely due to a fear of death, but the idea that all traces of the self might be completely erased from the earth. The poem rejects traditional human attempts at preserving the memory of an individual through the building of monuments, statues, or buildings as doomed to either decay through the effects of time or to ruin through the violence of war. The sonnet itself (“this powerful rhyme”), however, is upheld as a vehicle of immortality that will not be destroyed. “You live in this,” declares the poet in the last line of the sonnet, suggesting that the youth to which the poem is addressed can somehow be preserved through the poem, which is immune to physical destruction. The last line of the poem also connects love with eternity and immortality by asserting that despite death, the youth will always “dwell in lovers’ eyes.” This phrase suggests that while the body and self are lost and forgotten, love is eternal; the youth will somehow “live” in the eyes of all lovers who might read the poem throughout time. While “Sonnet 55” takes a defiant stand against oblivion, the speaker’s attitude toward death can be seen as ultimately ambiguous. L. C. Knights in his 1934 essay on “Shakespeare’s Sonnets” commented: “[I]n all the Sonnets [which promise some form of immortality], it is the contemplation of change, not the boasting and defiance, that produces the finest poetry; they draw their value entirely from the evocation of that which is said to be defied or triumphed over.”
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-28 | by a guest


.: :.

Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 55 :
Shakespeare’s purpose in his Sonnet 55 is two-fold: first, he wants to emphasize the importance, strength, and general goodness of poetry when compared to other, more worldly things, and second, he wants to compliment the subject of his poem, praising them in a way that implies rather than directly states their excellence. This purpose is achieved through allusions to various religions, alternating destructive and complementary diction, symbolism, and seemingly paradoxical comparisons.
There are several allusions in Sonnet 55, ranging from outright name-dropping to more subtle references to Judgment Day. First, Shakespeare references Roman mythology when he writes, “Nor Mars with his sword…shall burn” (7). This allusion helps show the sort of destruction that will occur in everything but poetry. Mars is the god of war, slaughtering everything in his path, and saying that the poem will survive this kind of destruction speaks novels about its power. The second religious allusion takes place when Shakespeare writes, “That wear this world out to the ending doom. So, till the judgement that yourself arise,” (12-13). This is a reference to the biblical judgement day; the end of the world. Saying that the poem will survive until the very end of the world implies that it is extremely strong and resilient.
The destructive diction of the poem gives Shakespeare’s message in much the same way the allusions do, by showing how resilient poetry is. Shakespeare uses words such as “wasteful war,” (5) “overturn,” (5) and “war’s quick fire,” (7) to show how most things are destroyed through war and strife. This helps show that poetry is powerful for being able to survive it. The poem’s complementary diction helps with the poem’s other purpose: to compliment the subject. It uses words like “shine more bright,” (3) “praise,” (10) and “lover’s eyes,” (14) all of which show Shakespeare’s affection for the subject.
There is some symbolism in Sonnet 55 which helps Shakespeare’s purpose. The statues referenced when Shakespeare writes “When wasteful war shall statues overturn,” (5) represent material and worldly representations of the subject such as portraits, statues, and so on. These lines show that material representations of the subject will eventually be destroyed, but the poem will live on afterward. This shows, again, how important and strong poetry is.
Early in the sonnet, there is a paradoxical comparison that makes the reader think more carefully about the poem, increasing its impact. Shakespeare writes “But you shall shine more bright in these contents / than unswept stone besmear’d with sluttish time,” (3-4) which is a paradox at first glance. Shakespeare is saying that the subject is more bright than something that is dirty and smudged, which isn’t much of a compliment at all. This passage, however, makes the reader focus more carefully, which in turn leads them to think more carefully about the poem.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-28 | by a guest


.: :.

Analysis :
Shakespeare's Sonnet no. 55 speaks of memorializing the memory of a friend or acquaintaince. A sonnet, Shakespeare claims, will last far longer than a physical monument, even "to the ending doom" (the end of humanity and Judgement day).
This sonnet is rife with historical and religious references. The line "Nor Mars his sword, nor war's quick fire shall burn" refers to Mars, the god of war, as the cause of war and the "quick fire" as the result of it. The "judgement" mentioned in line 13 refers to the Final Judgement, which, according to the Catholic Bible, will occur at the end of the world. Then, Shakespeare claims, the deceased friend will rise again and find that s/he has been remembered until that point because of his poetical immortalization.
LINE BY LINE ANALYSIS
NOT MARBLE, NOR THE GILDED MONUMENTS
Not marble, nor the gold-plated monuments
OF PRINCES, SHALL OUTLIVE THIS POWERFUL RHYME;
Of princes (the monuments), will be outlived by the power of poetry;
BUT YOU SHALL SHINE MORE BRIGHT IN THESE CONTENTS
You shall shine more brightly in these verses
THAN UNSWEPT STONE BESMEAR'D WITH SLUTTISH TIME.
Than in a neglected moument ravaged by time.
WHEN WASTEFUL WAR SHALL STATUES OVERTURN,
When destructive/devastating war will destroy/uproot statues,
AND BROILS ROOT OUT THE WORK OF MASONRY,
And conflicts destroy the masonry (stonework),
NOR MARS HIS SWORD NOR WAR'S QUICK FIRE SHALL BURN
Neither Mars (cause of war) nor the resulting fire (effects of war) can or will destroy
THE LIVING RECORD OF YOUR MEMORY.
The living record of your memory (in the poetry).
'GAINST DEATH AND ALL-OBLIVIOUS ENMITY
Against death and hate that destroys the memories/recollections of other people
SHALL YOU PACE FORTH; YOUR PRAISE SHALL STILL FIND ROOM
Shall you keep going; your praises (of you) will still find a place
EVEN IN THE EYES OF ALL POSTERITY
Even in the eyes of the people to come
THAT WEAR THIS WORLD OUT TO THE ENDING DOOM.
That will live on/exist until the end of humanity.
SO, TIL THE JUDGEMENT THAT YOURSELF ARISE
So until Judgement Day when you will rise from the dead (to be judged; Biblical reference)
YOU LIVE IN THIS, AND DWELL IN LOVER'S EYES.
You live in this poem, are loved by those who "know" you, and are remembered as something greater than you really were and untarnished by other peoples' recollections .
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-28 | by a guest


.: :.

Analysis :
Shakespeare’s Sonnet 55 deals with the idea that the subject will be made immortal in these verses, though everything else will be lost through war, “sluttish” time, or other violent forces. Shakespeare elevates poetry as superior, and the only assurance of immortality in this world, but lowers this particular sonnet itself as being unworthy of his subject. Thus, his theme is that everything will be destroyed and forgotten except the subject, who will be praised forever, because they are immortalized in these lines.
The first stanza talks about how time will not destroy the subject, though it shall destroy the world’s most magnificent structures. Thus, poetry is stronger than these structures. The second stanza says that war will not destroy the subject; the third states that the subject will forever be remembered and honored. The couplet sums this up, and also suggests that the subject is love itself. Thus, the thesis of this sonnet is that the subject will be honored forever in the verses, though the verses themselves are unworthy of them.
At the very beginning, Shakespeare suggests that his sonnet is magnificent by using very magnificent comparisons in lines 1-2:
Not marble, nor the gilded monuments ,
Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;
In contrast, he uses the word “rhyme” at the end of line 2, which is often used to signify common and mediocre, even bad, poetry, which suggests that it is the subject of his sonnet that lends magnificence to the verses.
This is only confirmed in lines 3-4:
But you shall shine more bright in these contents
Than unswept stone, besmeared with sluttish time.
Shakespeare comments that his subject will be brighter in his sonnet than an old and dirty stone, again suggesting, by equating his poem with dirt, that his sonnet does not live up to the subject. He likewise calls Time “sluttish”, meaning promiscuous, perhaps in contrast with his subject's purity. Also, the reference to stone recalls the structures alluded to in line 1.
Lines 5-6 (a new stanza) begins a new idea:
When wasteful war shall statues overturn
And broils root out the work of masonry,
Shakespeare has so far spoken of two destructive forces: time and war. He is here describing war destroying stone structures, which relates back to the “marble” and “gilded monuments” in line 1, that likewise do not last.
Lines 7-8 continue the war theme:
Nor Mars his sword nor war’s quick fire shall burn
The living record of your memory.
These lines talk of more war, and how it shall not destroy the poem. " Mars his sword" is a possessive, using the his genitive . “Living” contrasts with the destruction of the non-living structures in lines 1 and 5-6, meaning that the subject lends not only magnificence, but a living soul to these verses.
The next stanza does not talk about survival, but of human appreciation. He continues to praise his subject:
‘Gainst death and all-oblivious enmity
Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room
Even in the eyes of all posterity
That wear this world out to the ending doom.
There is still a suggestion of survival, but survival of human appreciation, and not of the verse itself. “Doom” refers to Judgement Day, suggesting in the context of the rest of the poem that this poetic record of his subject will survive, and be praised, to the end of time. The slight deviation of the meter in the words “Even in” creates emphasis for this permanency.
The ending couplet is a summary of the survival theme:
So ‘till the judgement that yourself arise,
You live in this, and dwell in lovers’ eyes.
The couplet not only summarizes the rest of the sonnet, but also seems to contradict itself. “Judgement” goes with the talk of Judgement Day in the last stanza, and implies that the subject is alive and will be judged on that day, but “dwelling in lovers’ eyes” suggests that the subject is love itself. Thus, Shakespeare seems to consider the subject so lovely that he is a personification of Love, which cannot be conquered and to which no poetry can do justice.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-28 | by a guest




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