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Sonnet 62: Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye Analysis



Author: poem of William Shakespeare Type: poem Views: 18

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Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye,
And all my soul, and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for my self mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed
Beated and chapped with tanned antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-loving were iniquity.
    'Tis thee, myself, that for my self I praise,
    Painting my age with beauty of thy days.

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In this sonnet one could eventually grasp the notion of identification between the poet and his beloved who has become part of the poet's own self..the poet starts in the first quatrian with the direct confession that he has a sin which is self-love; a declaration which reflects vanity, arrogance and narcissism.He is totally obssesed by such love and if it were a disease, there would be no remedy or treatment to it. It is incurable; it's inherent and perpetual. The second quatrian again develops the same idea of self-admiration and stresses it by asserting that there isn't any face more beautiful than his own. He surpasses all in appearance and character.He highly values his own self and defies any competitors;no body could reach his excellence;he is at the top. Then comes the volta or the turn at the beginning of line 9 which starts with "but" to denote the reversal of thought.When he looks in the mirror, he realizes how ugly he is because of old age and wrinkles. The conclusion is made in the couplet which points out that the poet's partner has become part of the poet's self and hence by praising himself he is in fact praising his beloved who is the source of beauty in the poet's life.
posted by Reham

| Posted on 2009-08-25 | by a guest




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