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Sonnet XXIX Analysis



Author: Poetry of Elizabeth Barrett Browning Type: Poetry Views: 516

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I think of thee !--my thoughts do twine and bud
About thee, as wild vines, about a tree,
Put out broad leaves, and soon there 's nought to see
Except the straggling green which hides the wood.
Yet, O my palm-tree, be it understood
I will not have my thoughts instead of thee
Who art dearer, better ! Rather, instantly
Renew thy presence; as a strong tree should,
Rustle thy boughs and set thy trunk all bare,
And let these bands of greenery which insphere thee
Drop heavily down,--burst, shattered, everywhere !
Because, in this deep joy to see and hear thee
And breathe within thy shadow a new air,
I do not think of thee--I am too near thee.


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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




.: :.

Basically, she lub him and he lub her and they both neked.

| Posted on 2016-02-07 | by a guest


.: :.

its a bad poem that some fool can't get her boyfriend cos secretly her "boyfriend" doesn't acc love her otherwise he would come to her. if you really love someone, they would do anything to be with them. mental

| Posted on 2016-02-05 | by a guest


.: :.

Basically, the poem is about the narrator wishing his or her lover to be near, and to be naked. This could represent a deep need to return to the Garden of Eden, and the way of life prior to the eating of the fruit from the tree of knowledge. After eating the fruit, Adam and Eve became aware of their nakedness, but before, they were ignorant to it.
"Rustle thy boughs and set thy trunk all bare,
And let these bands of greenery which insphere thee
Drop heavily down,--burst, shattered, everywhere !"
This quote from the poem may mean that the narrator doesn't want clothing to ever return, and wants their lover to remain nude forever.
In contrast, the narrator could be talking about God, or Jesus rather than a lover, and the poem could illustrate the narrator's need to be close to God in the Garden of Eden, without the need for clothing.

| Posted on 2009-09-27 | by a guest




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