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When We Two Parted Analysis



Author: poem of Lord Byron Type: poem Views: 348


When we two parted
In silence and tears,
Half broken-hearted,
To sever for years,
Pale grew thy cheek and cold,
Colder thy kiss;
Truly that hour foretold
Sorrow to this.

The dew of the morning
Sank chill on my brow—
It felt like the warning
Of what I feel now.
Thy vows are all broken,
And light is thy fame:
I hear thy name spoken,
And share in its shame.

They name thee before me,
A knell to mine ear;
A shudder comes o'er me—
Why wert thou so dear?
They know not I knew thee,
Who knew thee too well:—
Long, long shall I rue thee
Too deeply to tell.

In secret we met—
In silence I grieve
That thy heart could forget,
Thy spirit deceive.
If I should meet thee
After long years,
How should I greet thee?—
With silence and tears.

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




.: :.

My personal opinion is that the poem is about a romantic love between two people, it makes no difference if the other person is a man or woman.

| Posted on 2013-11-04 | by a guest


.: :.

I read some analysis said that \"she\" were dead ,and it was death that separated them,but in my own point, the separation is just a normal separation when the two lovers had some unbearable reasons so they chose to be apart.

| Posted on 2012-02-08 | by a guest


.: :.

I\'ve learnt the poem to actually be about finding out his mistress (the woman he was sleeping with aside his wife) had been with sleeping with other men, so it being an affair within an affair. It shows evidence of his love for her, and how he hated hearing people speak of her in foul manner and how it tugs at his reputation as a Lord.

| Posted on 2011-02-08 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this poem is about a parent and a child. Perhaps Byron fathered a child, who at one point knew of him...Then as the child realized that it was kept a secret, it became \"colder\" to Byron. For this he felt shame. Perhaps, the child learned of some great rumors that led it to feel disappointed, because it could not lay claim to the relationship of the famed father, therefore, \"light\". When Byron hears the child\'s name spoken, he shares in his own personal shame that he doesn\'t claim it as his own. So, as he ages and perhaps may one day run into said child or see said child from across a busy street, he would be in silent tears, for the mistakes he\'s made.

| Posted on 2011-02-04 | by a guest


.: :.

it\'s about byron\'s affair with his friend\'s wife, or something :)
they ommitted the last verse...Then --- fare thee well --- Fanny ---
Now doubly undone ---
To prove false unto many ---
As faithless to One ---
Thou art past all recalling
Even would I recall ---
For the woman once falling
Forever must fall.
Read more: x bless you all!

| Posted on 2011-01-25 | by a guest


.: :.

It is said that Lord Byron engaged himself in bisexual relationships. Could this poem be about his secret relationship with another man? We should remember that Lord Byron is handsome and he does "date" other women for pleasure. What difference will one woman make? We should also remember that this was in the 18th or 19th century and having a relationship with someone of the same gender is something different. But, this is just my analysis. I might be wrong. After all, im only 16 :) deana
Yes. We're doing this for GCSE and we got taught this.
I'm 14 and I think it could be about a man, there's nothing to disprove that theory.
Hannah

| Posted on 2009-10-17 | by a guest


.: :.

(just my opinion).he had been betrayed. maybe spent an evening with people who were talking about whoever he held dear and they were discussing that person's private life - in which he did not feature. this is how he found out. he had felt the cold kiss, but had not worked out why it was that way. listening to the people who 'knew thee too well' explained why the lover had been that way. he was unable to articulate the sadness to anyone. the broken vows refer to what that personhad promised him, not their vows to another. in some way also, he is questioning his deep feelings, when he feels that his lover's feelings may have been shallow. if he met them in years to come, he would silently cry, as the person wouldn't deserve to see a public display of sadness. and i wouldn't be too sure it was a woman ;-)

| Posted on 2009-08-23 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that it is about Lord Byron and his lover, probably the married woman, and how they were forced to break it off. They didn't want to, but they had to. She is shocked and upset, and then angry, hence her kissing him goodbye coldly. He is saying, basically, I told you so in the sixth and seventh lines.
Then her vows of fidelity and monogamy are broken. Later, in the third verse, he is expressing how hel can't believe he ever loved her, but we see in the fourth verse that he really does love her and still want her and all the third line was just bravado, but knows they can never be together again.
I could be wrong, I'm only a teenager -- just my interpretation

| Posted on 2009-06-04 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this whole poem is about the betrayal of loved ones.The betrayal in the poem is her promising to always rember him and for byron to always be her favourite man butshe then goes and has another affair with somebody else.

| Posted on 2009-04-25 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this whole poem is about the betrayal of loved ones.The betrayal in the poem is her promising to always rember him and for byron to always be her favourite man butshe then goes and has another affair with somebody else.

| Posted on 2009-04-25 | by a guest


.: :.

I really love this poem!
My interpritation of what this poem is about is his affiar with Lady Caroline Lamb who was married to William Melbourne. Their affiar lasted for four months before he broke it off because of the pressure of society... He loved her, but couldn't be with her... Sounds like what the poem is saying to me... but i really don't know! Just a guess!
Lovley poem thoguh!

| Posted on 2009-04-05 | by a guest


.: :.

It is said that Lord Byron engaged himself in bisexual relationships. Could this poem be about his secret relationship with another man? We should remember that Lord Byron is handsome and he does "date" other women for pleasure. What difference will one woman make? We should also remember that this was in the 18th or 19th century and having a relationship with someone of the same gender is something different. But, this is just my analysis. I might be wrong. After all, im only 16 :) deana

| Posted on 2009-03-04 | by a guest


.: :.

i believe that byron was speaking in general for his lust of women and how that after a while it grows old, which may seem like a death to him. He got mixed up in a few awkward relations, which i believe the lines "how should i greet thee! With silence and tears." refers to if he were to see any of the ladies he had mistreated in past.

| Posted on 2009-01-28 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that the poem is about the speaker and his beloved and how they had to move away from each other due to whatever reasons and that it was very hard to part from each other! Most likely it was some secret love that could not be expressed publicly and so as they break of all ties, the speaker tells us about the moring when they had to see each other for the last time and the sadness he felt then was only less than what he feels now.
"The dew of the morning
Sank chill on my browó
It felt like the warning
Of what I feel now."
He says that when her name is spoken he feels despair and that all the promises they had made to each other can not be kept, due to those circumstances.
As the poem ends the speaker says that I miss you secretly and wishes that she does not forget him, or her "spirit deceives"
To conclude he asks her, If should we ever meet again how will we meet, as two normal people meeting for the first time? Or as two lovers joining together again? (this is where tears comes in, to meet enthusiastically and with happiness)

| Posted on 2009-01-25 | by a guest


.: :.

There was always speculation that Lord Byron had become involved with his half-sister, Augusta. After these rumours surfaced, Byron left England to live in Italy.
The lines "I hear thy name spoken, And share in its shame," articulate the disgrace Byron could have felt when the rumors were spread. Another point is, "In silence we met, in silence I grieve" convey that his relationship with his lover was clandestine and if the affair with the married woman was clandestine, perhaps not as many people would know about it now.
However this is just my view on the poem, I am only fourteen and it is extremely likely that I am incorrect. :)

| Posted on 2008-10-04 | by a guest


.: :.

I love this poem, Byron is depressed over losing his secret lover, who is married. "Pale grew thycheek and cold, colder thy kiss..." says that she is turning away from him to be with her husband. She is trying to just break all ties without any further infadelity. Byron is heartbroken over the fact that if he ever sees her again that she will have lost the feelings that they once shared. He does not know if she will still love him or just go on with her life like he never happened. This poem shows that Byron did have some feelings for the women that he was with, although he wasn't perfect, he was perfectly capable of falling in love.

| Posted on 2008-04-17 | by a guest


.: I don't think it;'s a dea :.

I don't think the poem is about a death as it talks about shame that Byron felt which wouldn't normally be attributed to a death.
I can't find it at the moment, but there is an unpublished verse for the poem which makes it clear that the person is still alive.

| Posted on 2007-03-01 | by a guest


.: A break-up or a death? :.

When I first read this poem, I found myself automatically assuming that it was just Byron's way of breaking up with yet another one of his numerous partners. However, I soon discovered that, when I read it over a few more times, it seemed to be about (perhaps) a death of one of his lovers.
It seems that the line, "Pale grew thy cheek and cold," is our first tip-off that the subject matter of this poem had passed away. Later on in the poem, it says, "Thy vows are all broken," which stuck out at me right away. This is because, in my private knowledge of Byron, I know that he did once have an affair with a women who was married. Now that she is dead, it appears that both her marriage vows as well as vows to Byron, are broken.
What also supports my hypothesis that this is about a women that cheated on her husband with Byron is shown majorly in the line, "In secret we met," which quite obviously points out that their affair was anything but advertised.

| Posted on 2006-06-16 | by Approved Guest




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