famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

The Voice Analysis



Author: Poetry of Thomas Hardy Type: Poetry Views: 713

Woman much missed, how you call to me, call to me,

Saying that now you are not as you were

When you had changed from the one who was all to me,

But as at first, when our day was fair.Can it be you that I hear?Let me view you, then,

Standing as when I drew near to the town

Where you would wait for me: yes, as I knew you then,

Even to the original air-blue gown!Or is it only the breeze in its listlessness

Travelling across the wet mead to me here,

You being ever dissolved to wan wistlessness,

Heard no more again far or near?Thus I; faltering forward,Leaves around me falling,

Wind oozing thin through the thorn from norward,And the woman calling.






Sponsor


122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Hardy emphasizes the loss of his beloved wife metaphorically, with great detail to each stanza. As he deliberately whistles past the corridor to inaugurate a sense of humility to the un-idenitifed woman, he's demoralized.

| Posted on 2014-10-14 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem tells us about the poet, Thomas Hardy and his died wife Emma. At the beginning the word \"women\" gives us the idea of the poet being angry, however \"women much missed\" shows us that he misses his wife.
This poem is about the past and the present. The First stanza tells us about how much the poet the misses his wife. Thomas Hardy and his wife was really in love in the past, but the wife starts the change. And the poet losses interest in her. . The present consists of the time after the woman has died when the speaker hears her voice, looks back at their time together and expresses a feeling of grief, regret, guilt, and loneliness.

| Posted on 2012-05-12 | by a guest


.: :.

“The Voice” Analysis
In the poem “The Voice” by Thomas Hardy, the speaker of the poem hears what seems to be the voice of his dead wife, Emma. He remembers with nostalgia their time together before her death and in doing so three different moments of their lives are presented: the beginning of their relationship, the latest days of it, and the present. At the beginning, their relationship was based on love, whereas as time passed, the woman changed from the one he had fallen in love with and so a loss of love occurs, which is one of the poem\'s themes. The present consists of the time after the woman has died when the speaker hears her voice, looks back at their time together and expresses a feeling of grief, regret, guilt, and loneliness. The author establishes a contrast between these particular moments through the use of several different devices.
To begin with, the first moment is mostly presented in the second stanza. Unlike the other two, this moment of the couple\'s life was positive, which is shown by the phrase “when our day was fair” on the first stanza. It implies that at one point of their relationship, at the earlier times, their days were good, due to the presence of love. On the second stanza, the voice remembers their days of courtship in which he would drive near to the town where the woman waited for him. As he implores the woman to appear to him in the same place and wearing the same attire, a sense of longing and loneliness is created. This attire is described through the vivid visual image “original air-blue gown!” By connecting the color blue to the color of the air, actually referring to the sky, a positive connotation is given to the memory of this first moment, emphasizing the fact that those days were full of joy and love. The existance of an exclamation in that phrase conveys a sense of excitement, related to their earliest days. In this stanza, the tone is hopeful and rigorous as the speaker believes he is hearing the voice of his dead wife. This is shown by the question “Can it be you that I hear?” where he considers the possibility of actually being her whom he hears and thus gives him hope of not having lost her forever. The rhythm in this section is fast, as to emphasize
Furthermore, the second moment is depicted in the first stanza. Here, the speaker conveys how much he misses his wife and mentions a time when she had changed “from the one who was all to me.” Thus, this second moment refers to the times where his wife had changed, we know from the author\'s life that she had begun being sick and had periods of insanity. This lead to a loss of love, which, as a negative moment, contrasts with the positiveness of the second stanza. However, in the stanza in particular he seems to hear the woman calling to him and telling him that she is no longer the woman she had become when they fell out of love, “saying that now you are not as you were.” Hence, it is not as negative a stanza as the third and fourth. In the first line, the alliteration of the “m” sound on “Woman much missed” emphasizes how much he misses her as well as the meaning of the word missed. “Call to me” is repeated in this same line, having the effect of creating an echo.
Thirdly, the present of the speaker, although mentioned all throughout the poem, is especially found in the third and fourth stanzas where the speaker is filled with doubt. In the first stanza, his present moment is when he misses her and she calls to him. In the second stanza, that moment is present in the previously mentioned question on the first line. In both of these stanzas, he is quite confident that what he hears is the voice of his dead wife. However, in the third stanza, the word “or” introduces an alternative, the possibility that was he is hearing is not his wife. Instead it is only “the breeze in its listleness.” Thus, both the speaker and the tone become doubtful. The whole stanza is a big question presenting uncertainty as to whether it is really the woman\'s voice. “Listleness” conveys a sense of weakness, relatThe rhythm slows down, contrasting with the fast rhythm in the previous stanza, due to the doubt, confusion and hesitation the possibility that he is simply imagining her causes in him. Her voice would be an illusion, if it is really the wind he hears, with a haunting effect. Perhaps her voice haunts him in his mind due to his guilt over not having taken care of her during her illness and not having taken advantage of the time they had together towards the end of her life. If it is not her he hears, it would mean that his wife is gone forever so a sense of despair is created in the speaker and reflected in the tone of the last two lines of the stanza. “Dissolved to wan wistleness” implies this death and so her ceasing to exist forever, which would mean she would be “heard no more again far or near.” Hence, these two phrases mark the end of Emma\'s existence. “Wistleness” is an invented word, as it does not exist it emphasizes her lack of existence and may imply that the man could not even find a word for what her non existence means to him as it has a huge effect on him. “Wan” means sick and may refer to his wife\'s state before her death, her illness, that led to the ceasing of her life. “Far or near” in the last line are opposites, used to emphasize the idea that his wife will not be heard in no place, nowhere, never again.
Fourthly, The last stanza is also referring to the man\'s present times. The rhythm in this stanza becomes much less fluent, it is faltering. This means it is unstable, staggering and refers to a state of confusion and loneliness of the speaker. It coincides with the “faltering forward” of the speaker, implying instability, maybe because of weakness caused by the death of his wife. The alliteration of “f” in this phrase slows down the rhythm. Consequently, the rhythm captures the mood of the speaker in the last moment. The shorter lines and semi colon contribute to this kind of rhythm. The man describes through auditory and visual images what he sees and hears at his present time. A description of the approaching winter is found through these images, which is a season that matches the man\'s metaphorical lifelessness that resulted from his wife\'s death due to it being one commonly associated with lack of color, cold and usually other negative connotations. Winter is also linked to aging, reaching an old age and so becoming closer to death. It is as if the man was reaching the metaphorical winter of his life, his life is slowing down due to his grief. Due to his state of mind caused by the loss of everything he cared for, the moments seem to drag. The hyperbaton “leaves around me falling” shows this change of season. This alternation of the order of the words, “falling” in the end instead of the beginning, can be interpreted as coinciding with the speaker\'s own life turning around due to the death of his wife. The alliteration present in “thin through the thorn”, as it is a strong sound that is being repeated, helps add to the sense of suffering and struggle in the man\'s present. The sound of the breeze in this stanza is depicted through the use of sibilance, the repetitive use of the sound “s.” It helps add to the meaning of the stanza, to the possibility that what the man is hearing is the wind. The final line “and the woman calling” in the present continuous powerfully creates the idea that her voice is still present and probably will be forever in his mind. The idea that he cannot take her out of her mind due to him missing her, feeling guilty and regretful over the latest days of their relationship.
To conclude, the author creates contrast between the three different moments of the speaker\'s life not only through the actual content and what occurred in each, but through the changes in rhythm and tone as well

| Posted on 2011-06-16 | by a guest


.: :.

The voice is a poem by Thomas Hardy. It is a lyrical poem. It deals with the author’s emotions and feelings. In this poem, the author imagines a previous lover communicating with him and calling to him. She tells him that she is not any more the woman she had become in their relationship, but has regained her youth and beauty, when her and Hardy\'s “day was fair”. The poem focuses on Hardy’s deep sense of loss and despairing thoughts about whether the voice is actual or simply imagination.
The poem is full of contrasts of dreamlike imagination and crushing reality. Hardy chooses to show these contrasts by using imagery to present them, this not only makes the situation more vivid and lifelike, but also helps the reader relate with the poem, using the five senses to harness the reader’s imagination. We can see this in lines such as “Even to the original air-blue gown” where Hardy uses sight to help the reader picture the elusiveness of the woman, saying that she is “air blue”; and in lines like “the breeze in its listlessness, traveling across the wet mead to me here” here he personifies the wind to stress his desperation and loneliness, so that the wind seems his only companion on the bleak moors. Hardy uses many personifications in the poem, such as “wind oozing” and “breeze traveling”; these also help the reader develop ideas and images of the situation in the poem.
The poem is made up of four stanzas with four lines per stanza. Although there is a variation of situation in each stanza, there is a definite progression between each paragraph. The first stanza is describing the calls of the woman, and the author reminisces about the woman’s lost youth. He then goes on to a memory of the woman in the second stanza. The transition here is an optimistic one as we see the author fill up with joyful memories of the woman in her youth. Then, in the third stanza, the author’s dream fades to the lonely reality and we see a transition from confidence to self-doubt. These transitions serve to highlight the waxing and waning of the author’s dreams and desperation and deepen our connection with the author’s feelings. The poem rhymes with an ABAB pattern throughout. The rhythm of the poem changes throughout with the feelings of the author. In the first stanza, the beat is regular, however there is less stress on the end of the sentence so the reader’s voice will fall at the end of each line, this creates a mournful feel as if the woman herself was calling. The rhythm changes in the second stanza and becomes irregular due to a caesura after the question in the first line. This makes the stanza seem more conversational and excited as this is when the author believes that he hears the woman and tries to address her. The third stanza continues this rhythm however, the mood changes due to the question at the end of the stanza. This creates a feeling of self-doubt and uncertainty. The fourth stanza has much shorter lines than the others and breaks down the rhythm of the poem as if the author’s emotions are also staggering and breaking down. The use of caesura followed by long phrases also creates a feeling of chaos and emphasize the author’s misery.
The author uses many interesting words and phrases to acutely describe his emotions throughout the poem, such as “air blue gown”, this could either be the author’s allusion of the woman’s youth and radiance, the colour of her dress or it could be alluding to the fact that the woman’s existence is almost spectre like. Another set of words is “listlessness” and “wistlessness”, wistlessness in the third line echoes listlessness in the 1st line, the repetition of this long and sluggish sound affirms the author’s mood of despair, added to which the word wistlessness is made up by Hardy, further transmitting a feeling of lifeless despair to the reader. Alliteration is another technique used in the fourth stanza, we see this in “Thus I; faltering forward, leaves around me falling, wind oozing thin through the thorn from norward” . It’s evident that the author is alliterating the sounds “th” and “f” here. The use of alliteration here is apt as it slows down the tempo and almost seems to convey the fact that the poet is struggling to accept the truth of the woman’s absence and is trying to move forwards but finding it difficult.
At first, “The Voice” seems to be the story of a man haunted by memories. However as we consider it further we see the story of a man haunting memories , despairingly wishing for the images trapped in his mind to spring before his eyes yet he is always confronted with the cruel reality of loss instead. We find in the last stanza of the poem that the “leaves around me are falling” and the world is still moving, oblivious to any single person’s loss, and we see the author attempting to falter forward in the hope of regaining more than a voice.

| Posted on 2011-06-06 | by a guest


.: :.

\"Poetry is for fat, james blunt listening, ford escort driving pricks.\"
What an immature, closed minded, not to mention totally irrelevant comment. Poetry appeals to a wide range of people; the simple story books read to you as a child were proabably a form of poetry. Lyrics are poetry. There are different genres, styles...whoever wrote that comment, PLEASE get over yourself! I love poetry, and I\'m not fat, nor do I like James Blunt. I also don\'t drive a Ford Escort (mostly due to me not being able to drive yet).
But anyway...\'Call to me, call to me\' creates an echoed effect which can be inturpreted differently. This could be an imitation of Emma\'s voice, \'calling\' with an echoed voice (like the stereotypical ghost). However it could be could represent Hardy\'s desperation to be with Emma again. Throughout the poem there is also a large sense of remorse and pain related to her death (for example, \'thorn\').

| Posted on 2011-05-22 | by a guest


.: :.

There is a strong sense of grief and despair throughout the poem due to his loss of Emma. We feel it and also feel pity for Hardy.

| Posted on 2011-04-14 | by a guest


.: :.

\"Call to me\", \"Call to me\" his repetition explores his love (wife) is calling him from the hell and he can hear her which shows their depth of love.

| Posted on 2011-04-10 | by a guest


.: :.

call to me, call to me has an echoing effect and it makes it seem as though she is calling from beyond the grave

| Posted on 2011-03-15 | by a guest


.: :.

=I think this is about a man who has lost his wife and is grieving x

| Posted on 2011-03-09 | by a guest


.: :.

the use of the word thorn is very significant as it acts as a metaphor to describe hardy\'s state of mind as he regrets that he couldnt give all the help that emma neede in her delusional state. Thus when his memories slowly start fading away the thorn remains as a reminder, pricking him to reawaken the guilt and sadness.

| Posted on 2011-02-06 | by a guest


.: :.

\"Poetry is for fat, james blunt listening, ford escort driving pricks.\"
No. That is precisely the type of people who do NOT have the artistic intellect to read poetry.
You poor sod.

| Posted on 2011-01-15 | by a guest


.: :.

Poetry is for fat, james blunt listening, ford escort driving pricks.

| Posted on 2010-10-12 | by a guest


.: :.

look fools this is why you should get a bloody english teacher. thanx..

| Posted on 2010-09-20 | by a guest


.: :.

Thomas Hardy\'s poem on \'the voice\' has brought me to believe that it is about a poet who feels deep remorse at guilt. By saying \'much missed\'

| Posted on 2010-09-14 | by a guest


.: :.

would anyone likes to help me with the poetic devices

| Posted on 2010-05-19 | by a guest


.: :.

would anyone likes to help me with the poetic devices

| Posted on 2010-05-19 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem reflects the sorrow and regret that thomas hardy feels, due to the fact that he neglected his wife during her last years when she truly needed him by her side

| Posted on 2010-04-19 | by a guest


.: :.

The voice by thomas hardy is on of the extra odinary and brilliant poems writhhen between 1912 and 1913.i think poet was a real nemphomaniac and always thought about his wife emma.i think she was really beutifull and could not stop himself from thinking about her.he imagines her in blue gown and i think she was awsome in her looks and thatswhy poet missed her much and he is saying that plz call to me .

| Posted on 2010-04-13 | by a guest


.: :.

THE VOICE THOMAS HARDY
The poem begins with a lyrical, effervescent flowing rhythm, Woman much missed, how you call to me, call to me/saying that now you are not as you were, as the enjambment and personal pronouns reflect the flowing, passionate romanticism that Hardy is trying to convey. However the structure of the poem is a diminuendo- as the happiness and love of the relationship is lost to wan wistleness and the wet mead, to the point that Hardy regresses into the elegiac reference to he wanderer with Thus I, and the final bitter indictment of the woman calling reveals how their relationship regressed from one flowing love and air blue gowns to listleness and the stumbling rhythm of the leaves around me falling
Its about his refusal to accept the death of his wife. He is so caught up in his desire or her still that he almost thinks he can hear her voice talking to him.
Hardys last stanza is much shorter in its composition to the previous three stanzas and is his attempt to regain order in his life by moving on faltering forward. The difficulty Hardy feels in doing so is mirrored in the arrangement of punctuation- by placing a semi colon immediately after Thus I the phrase faltering forward is stressed. This combined with its use of alliteration alerts the reader to how significant the phrase is. It is Hardys attempt to accept the inevitability of death and move on with life.
This poem is in the form of a 1st person narrative as Hardy contemplates whether he can hear his dead wifes voice or not. The poem has 4 stanzas; first 3 are in the form of anapestic metre. This conveys his initial hope, as he believes he can hear Emmas voice. However Hardy soon comes to term with her death. The most poignant line of the poem is even in the original air blue gown i.e. hardy has powerful dillusions of Emma when she was youthful and full of radiance and beauty. This could also be seen as hardy seeing a phantom or specter who he believes to be his wife.
The last line and the woman calling relates how hardy still reminisces Emma when he first met her and how these memories are still following him despite the shift in time. The memory of her is haunting him and that he is totally falling apart.
The last stanza however is less fluent and almost chaotic in terms of the use of pathetic fallacy, leaves faltering forward. This reflects on Hardys mood and decision that he must move forward and Emmas voice is imaginary. Subsequently conveying his desolation at the end of the poem. This contrasts to the beginning of the poem which is optimistic.
Hardy wrote this poem due to the guilt of not taking care of Emma when she was sick. They both had an estranged relationship. In the poem he uses different poetry techniques to help the reader understand things easily, like alliteration, sibilance, repetition etc.
Hardy is coming to terms with Emmas death. He is obviously somewhat lost without her and his grieving has left him with memories that appear to play tricks on his mind. They loved each other but it was a destructive love; perhaps the most powerful kind. Maybe the wind was to blow that pain away or was it a part of the force of destructive that was their relationship.
The last stanza is chaotic. The wind has blown it all apart. The repetitive vowel sounds, however, create some unity as the link each word together. The words merge. They become the wind; they become the echoing voice.
Hardy and Emma were separated at the time of her sudden unexpected death. He wrote several poems which reflect the stages of grief he is experiencing and this is largely believed to be the poem he wrote at the point of recovery.
Critics have suggested that the voice could be calling him to death and hardy is contemplating suicide, before recovering.
In the last stanza he realizes that he cant go on seeing his wife in places she doesnt exist. She is dead and although he will always think of her he cant change the terms on which they parted and he feels alone and depressed.
As conclusion i would like to add dat hardy ws a sad person wid no ambitions and aspirations
he should die in a bucket of water
he cnt fc 1 loss
learn frm a high skul kid
he faces breakups everyday
DIEDIE MOVE ON !!!!
By the gr8 yash

| Posted on 2010-04-13 | by a guest


.: :.

i think that hardy was in a deep relationship with emma. When Emma Died, the pain in Hardy's heart was unrestable.
His love for Emma was forever dissolved. And he could not do anything. He was blaming Emma for all this. The words "wistlesness and listlesness" as add to the ethereal atmosphere of the poem. The line' even to the original air blue gown' makes hardy think the radiance and the beauty of Emma wearing blue clothes in the night.
thankyou BY - KARTIKEYA

| Posted on 2010-04-13 | by a guest


.: :.

The last stanza of the poem is most significant. It reveals that although Hardy may have began optimistic, he is still ridden with guilt for leaving Emma alone when she was ill and for having affairs. The most unusual imagery Hardy uses is: "Wind oozing thin" this may be seen as a liquid slowly dispersing through the air, yet it could also imply that the voice of Emma: "and the woman calling" is beginning to ebb away, disapper. This therefore juxtaposes with the rhythm as it is less fluid then previous ones. Emma's voice has managed to drift into his life quickly and leave just as suddenly. Therefore Hardy is "faltering" and beginng to accept that Emma has died and that no matter how guilty he feels he will never be able to relive the past he has such fond memories of: "the one who was all to me" (1st stanza) and "air-blue gown" (stanza 2). THus, the tone at the end of the poem is bleak as Hardy believes that he has imagined Emma's voice afterall.

| Posted on 2010-04-02 | by a guest


.: :.

thanx to every1 who posted, i got an A in my exam coz of u guys

| Posted on 2010-03-30 | by a guest


.: :.

As in The Haunter Hardy imagines Emma trying to communicate with him. The poem is in the first person, and Hardy is the speaker, imagining that Emma calls to him. She tells him that she is not the woman she had become after forty years of marriage, but has regained the beauty of her youth, of the time when her and Hardy's day was fair.
Detailed commentary
Imagining he can indeed hear her, Hardy implores Emma to appear to him, in the place and wearing the same clothes that he associates with their early courtship. Hardy introduces, in the third stanza, the mocking fear that all he hears is the wind and that Emma's death has marked the end of her existence - that she has been dissolved and will be heard no more.
The lively anapaestic metre of the first three stanzas gives way, in the final stanza, to a less fluent rhythm, capturing the desolate mood of Hardy as he falters forward, while the leaves fall and the north wind blows, as Emma (if it is she) continues to call.
The poem begins optimistically with a hope that Emma is really addressing Hardy. But by the end, a belief or fear that the voice is imaginary has replaced this hope. Though the vigorous anapaestic metre of the poem helps convey this initial hope, it proves unwieldy for Hardy, as is evident in the clumsy third stanza, where listlessness rhymes with Hardy's unfortunate coinage (invented word) existlessness, and we find the gauche and repetitious phrase no more again in the stanza's final line.

| Posted on 2010-03-28 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem opens with a lyrical, effervescent flowing rhythm, "Woman much missed, how you call to me, call to me/Saying that now you are not as you were", as the enjambment and personal pronouns reflect the flowing, passionate romanticism that Hardy is trying to convey. However, the structure of the poem is a diminuendo- as the happiness and love of the relationship is lost to "wan wistlessness" and the "wet mead", to the point that Hardy regresses into the elegaic reference to "The Wanderer" with "Thus I", and the final bitter indictment of "the woman calling" reveals how their relationship regressed from one of flowing love and "air blue gowns" to " "listlessness" and the stumbling rhythm of the "leaves around me falling".

| Posted on 2010-01-13 | by a guest


.: :.

The rhythm's not anapestic, to begin with, despite what some other people have been saying. It's dactylic, or TUM ta ta (falling rhythm). At least it mostly is, apart from the last stanza and some instances of spondee feet.
So it hence echoes heroic fiction, which is ironic when you think about it. Seeing as the poem's really Hardy's exploration of his guilt, it's interesting that he chooses metric feet seen in The Iliad or, more recently, The Charge of the Light Brigade, to convey feelings of personal failing.

| Posted on 2009-12-01 | by a guest


.: :.

Hi there, to all the guests that has contributed their point of views and explanations, THANKS A LOT. THis has helped me a lot.

| Posted on 2009-09-01 | by a guest


.: :.

It's about his refusal to accept the death of his wife. He is so caught up in his desire for her still that he almost thinks he can hear her voice talking to him.
Hardys last stanza is much shorter in its composition to the previous three stanzas, and is Hardys attempt to regain order in his life by moving on faltering forward. The difficulty Hardy feels in doing so is mirrored in the arrangement of punctuation - by placing a semi-colon immediately after Thus I, the phrase faltering forward is stressed. This combined with its use of alliteration alerts the reader to how significant the phrase is. It is Hardys attempt to accept the inevitability of death and move on with life.

| Posted on 2009-08-25 | by a guest


.: :.

The voice,is written by Thomas Hardy after the death of his wife Emma. This poem is in the form of a 1st person narrative as Hardy contemplates whether he can hear his dead wife's voice or not. This poem is written in 4 stanzas and the first three stanzas are written in the from of an anapestic metre. This conveys Hardy's inital hope as he believes he can her his wife's voice. However, this behaviour is a natural coping method as Hardy comes to term with the death of his wife. One of the most poignant lines in the poem is "Even in the original air blue gown" Hardy has powerful dillusions of Emma when she was youth full of radiance and beauty. This could also be interpreted as Hardy seeing a phantom or spectre whom he believes to be his wife. This line however does not fit into the rest of the poem so it conforms to some ambiguity. In addition the words such as "wistlesness and listlesness" as add to the ethereal atmosphere of the peom. The last line, " and the woman calling" relates to how Hardy still reminises his wife Emma when he first met her and how these memories are still following him, despite the shift in time. The last stanza however is less fluent and alsmost chaotic in terms of the use of pathetic fallacy, " leaves faltering forward". This reflects on Hardy's mood and decision thst he must move forward and comes to a realsation that the voice is imaginary. Subsequently, conveying Hardy's desolation at the end of the poem. This contrasts to the beggining of the poem as it is optimistic.

| Posted on 2009-05-18 | by a guest


.: :.

thanks for the analysis peeps.
its awesome for my stupid english literature exam.
THANK YOU A TON.

| Posted on 2009-04-28 | by a guest


.: :.

As i know .. Hardy 's relationship was not very good at the time, and things were complicated, and he didnt care for her when she was sick. So he wrote this poem due to his guilt, that he lacked the care to his wife. After her death he starts having painful dilusions and starts imagining his wife, Emma, calling for him, and that he's actually hearing her voice.
He used different poetry techniques that help the reader understand things easier, he uses alliteration, sibilance, repitition etc. He says in the very first like "call to me, call to me" which suggests that he's imaginig her trying to communicate with him, and that he's hearing his dead wife's voice in the sound of the wind. The memory of her is haunting him, and this shows that he can't stop thinking about her, and that he totally falling apart .. the very last line says "and the woman calling" which conveys that the memories of the wonderful days they had when they first met, are following him, and this gives a ghostly feeling to the poem.

| Posted on 2009-04-25 | by a guest


.: :.

Hardy is coming to terms with the death of his estranged wife. He obviously is somewhat lost without her and grieving has left him with memories that appear to play tricks on his mind. He can hear her voice, but whether it is out of longing or guilt is unclear. Is the wind taunting him, or is she taunting him?
They loved each other but it was a destructive love; perhaps the most powerful kind. Maybe the wind was to blow that pain away or was it a part of the force of destructive nature that was their relationship.
The last stanza is chaotic. The wind has blown it all apart. The repetitive vowel sounds, however, create some unity as they link each word together. The words merge. They become the wind; they become the echoing voice.

| Posted on 2008-12-06 | by a guest


.: :.

I don't like this poem. It's way tooo simple. I prefer nursery rhymes

| Posted on 2008-11-25 | by a guest


.: :.

I don't think it's a positive poem at all. The anapaestic rhythm in the first three stanzas creates an uplifting and hopeful atmosphere as Hardy thinks he can actually hear Emma but then in the forth stanza a less fluent rhythm is used and Hardy describes himself as "faltering forward" which reflects his desolate mood. Also, Neutral Tones wasn't even about Hardy and Emma so the two poems aren't contextually linked.

| Posted on 2008-11-18 | by a guest


.: :.

I thought this poem was, in some aspects, quite positive in the way Hardy thinks about his wife. He thinks of her in a positive way, in contrast to 'Neutral Tones' which portrays the couple at their worst. Hardy is reminiscing about when they first encountered eachother and how he likes to remember her when he says 'as I knew you then' and 'when our day was fair'. I thought that 'Even to the original air-blue gown!' was what she might have worn in the days where they were first falling for eachother. In the first stanza, in the third line, I think Hardy was trying to say that he had suddenly remembered her how he loved her and what she was like when he fell in love with her, and the idea of a voice was really just a very vivid memory that may have been positive but haunts him, as he is trying to move on with his life.

| Posted on 2008-11-04 | by a guest


.: The Voice :.

Hardy & his wife Emma were seperated at the time of her sudden unexpected death. He wrote several poems which reflect the stages of grief he is experiencing and this is largely believed to be the poem he wrote at the point of recovery.
He refers to hearing his wife calling him as he is alone and the "air blue gown" she wears reflects her potential to just dissapear like air. Also the breeze taunting him could also be interpreted as Emma because he can feel its presence but the breeze is indescribable and it cannot be touched or held like he wants to. Critics have suggested that the voice could be calling him into death and hardy is contemplating suicide, before recovering.
In the last stanza he realises he can't go on seeing his wife in places she doesn't exist. She is dead and although he will always think of her he can't change the terms on which they parted and he feels alone and depressed.
Hope this helps with some background info to go on =]

| Posted on 2008-04-11 | by a guest


.: :.

"Even to the origional airblue gown" is one of the greatest inventive lines in poetry. The image Hardy conjurs in the mind of a woman wearing a colorful gown in wet field on a windy night can only be that of a phantom or spectre. Hardy further impacts the scene through his use of a contrasting meter. The line does not fit onto the rest of the poem enforcing the strange ambiguity of the scene. The result is jarring.

| Posted on 2007-12-25 | by a guest


.: The Voice -Thomas Hardy :.

This 'gohst story' is dedicated to his dead wife. He can hear her voice and recollects a time of joy. He falteres forward, yearning to be with her again. He has been left alone, questioning his own existence. The only way he can continue, is to live and to stumble on.

| Posted on 2007-07-19 | by a guest


.: :.

Throughout all Hardy's poems about his first wife he is unable to accept her death. When they were first together they were in love but shortly after that grew sour. Hardy had an affair with Florence who became his second wife. However, Hardy is overcome with guilt at Emma's death when he didn't get the opportunity to say goodbye or to tell her that in fact he did really love her and wishes they could have been happy in her final days. Instead of admitting his fault he likes to blame Emma as he unable to cope with the large amount of blame he feels himself. He pretends that Emma knew she was going to die and did it to spite him. In this poem in particular he talks about Emma having changed without his realisation. This could be interpreted that she wanted to reminisce but didn't tell him or that she decided to be like him and put no effort into rekindling their romance.

| Posted on 2005-12-20 | by Approved Guest


.: :.

It's about his refusal to accept the death of his wife. He is so caught up in his desire for her still that he almost thinks he can hear her voice talking to him.
Hardys last stanza is much shorter in its composition to the previous three stanzas, and is Hardys attempt to regain order in his life by moving on faltering forward. The difficulty Hardy feels in doing so is mirrored in the arrangement of punctuation - by placing a semi-colon immediately after Thus I, the phrase faltering forward is stressed. This combined with its use of alliteration alerts the reader to how significant the phrase is. It is Hardys attempt to accept the inevitability of death and move on with life.

| Posted on 2005-11-01 | by Approved Guest


.: :.

ok im trying to appreciate this myself for coursework and its impossible but basically what i got so far is that the poem is written by a man who had a relationship with a woman and she changed (?!) and left him or they split up or something...then she came back "calling" to tge man and he is wondering if she is back to her old self who he loves (and he thinks she is but isn't completely sure but falls for her anyway)
but that was all blatantly obvious! someone help me!

| Posted on 2005-08-30 | by Approved Guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

The Voice Analysis Thomas Hardy critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. The Voice Analysis Thomas Hardy Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique The Voice Analysis Thomas Hardy itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education homework forum help



Poetry 30
Poetry 87
Poetry 20
Poetry 190
Poetry 13
Poetry 4
Poetry 35
Poetry 13
Poetry 24
Poetry 200
Poetry 214
Poetry 208
Poetry 195
Poetry 171
Poetry 190
Poetry 216
Poetry 106
Poetry 187
Poetry 150
Poetry 30