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Love's Usury Analysis



Author: Poetry of John Donne Type: Poetry Views: 826

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For every hour that thou wilt spare me now

I will allow,

Usurious God of Love, twenty to thee,

When with my brown my gray hairs equal be;

Till then, Love, let my body reign, and let

Me travel, sojourn, snatch, plot, have, forget,

Resume my last year's relic: think that yet

We'had never met.

Let me think any rival's letter mine,

And at next nine

Keep midnight's promise; mistake by the way

The maid, and tell the Lady of that delay;

Only let me love none, no, not the sport;

From country grass, to comfitures of Court,

Or cities quelque choses, let report

My mind transport.This bargain's good; if when I'm old, I be

Inflamed by thee,

If thine own honour, or my shame, or pain,

Thou covet most, at that age thou shalt gain.

Do thy will then, then subject and degree,

And fruit of love, Love I submit to thee;

Spare me till then, I'll bear it, though she be

One that loves me.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

This work by Donne is in my view a transcendent appeal by the author to what we might term the \"Goddess of Love.\"
It is a cry of youth to allow the very essence of love to permeate life, and being.
The youthful Donne is willing to pay any price no matter how high if only the singular passion which he calls love may dominate in the now.
Let\'s take a look at each stanza.
In the first stanza, the \"deal\" is offered.
Donne is willing to give the Goddess of Love 20 to 1, putting off until middle age the cost of burning with passion at all times now. (brown and grey hair).
Donne wants to experience everything the Goddess of Love has to offer. He wants to travel, snatch, plot, have, and continue every love affair as if it were brand new, never becoming stale. \"Resume last year\'s relict; think that yet we had never met.\"
In the second stanza, Donne offers that no control whatsoever should be placed upon him in his effort to become the embodiment of passion.
Donne is willing to read other lovers\' mail in order to obtain advantage (\"rival\'s letter mine\") and take advantage of every opportunity to externalize passion, even having relations with a maid on the way to an appointment with another woman, evidently hoping that the second woman will be so anxious for the delayed gratification, \"midnight\'s promise,\" that the crescendo of passion resulting will be a fitting tribute to the essence of the Goddess of Love.
Also in the second stanza, Donne requests that nothing distract him from this purest form of love\'s passion. \"No sport, or country scene or the food (jams) of Court or finely clad women, \"quelque-choses,\"should distract him from his real aim, which is pure Love.
In the final stanza, Donne is saying that when he is old (perhaps middle age) and he can no longer bathe in love through his physical body, he is offering himself to the Goddess of Love completely.
Then, the Goddess of Love can collect whatever she wishes. Donne will be at her disposal.
The Goddess can then gain her price for allowing Donne\'s youthful passions to reign. Whether it be shame or pain, it matters not to Donne.
To whatever degree and to whatever extent payment is required to satisfy the Goddess, Donne is willing to pay.
Finally, Donne pleads again to be spared the guilt, the commitment, the pain of wanting singularly a one who loves him, so that he can pursue love in its purest form now, love born of the fullest passion of which youth is capable.
Dr. Ron

| Posted on 2013-06-12 | by a guest


.: :.

This work by Donne is in my view a transcendent appeal by the author to what we might term the \"Goddess of Love.\"
It is a cry of youth to allow the very essence of love to permeate life, and being.
The youthful Donne is willing to pay any price no matter how high if only the singular passion which he calls love may dominate in the now.
Let\'s take a look at each stanza.
In the first stanza, the \"deal\" is offered.
Donne is willing to give the Goddess of Love 20 to 1, putting off until middle age the cost of burning with passion at all times now. (brown and grey hair).
Donne wants to experience everything the Goddess of Love has to offer. He wants to travel, snatch, plot, have, and continue every love affair as if it were brand new, never becoming stale. \"Resume last year\'s relict; think that yet we had never met.\"
In the second stanza, Donne offers that no control whatsoever should be placed upon him in his effort to become the embodiment of passion.
Donne is willing to read other lovers\' mail in order to obtain advantage (\"rival\'s letter mine\") and take advantage of every opportunity to externalize passion, even having relations with a maid on the way to an appointment with another woman, evidently hoping that the second woman will be so anxious for the delayed gratification, \"midnight\'s promise,\" that the crescendo of passion resulting will be a fitting tribute to the essence of the Goddess of Love.
Also in the second stanza, Donne requests that nothing distract him from this purest form of love\'s passion. \"No sport, or country scene or the food (jams) of Court or finely clad women, \"quelque-choses,\"should distract him from his real aim, which is pure Love.
In the final stanza, Donne is saying that when he is old (perhaps middle age) and he can no longer bathe in love through his physical body, he is offering himself to the Goddess of Love completely.
Then, the Goddess of Love can collect whatever she wishes. Donne will be at her disposal.
The Goddess can then gain her price for allowing Donne\'s youthful passions to reign. Whether it be shame or pain, it matters not to Donne.
To whatever degree and to whatever extent payment is required to satisfy the Goddess, Donne is willing to pay.
Finally, Donne pleads again to be spared the guilt, the commitment, the pain of wanting singularly a one who loves him, so that he can pursue love in its purest form now, love born of the fullest passion of which youth is capable.

| Posted on 2013-06-12 | by a guest




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