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The Blossom Analysis



Author: Poetry of William Blake Type: Poetry Views: 1797

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Songs of Innocence1789Merry Merry Sparrow

Under leaves so green

A happy Blossom

Sees you swift as arrow

Seek your cradle narrow

Near my Bosom.Pretty Pretty Robin

Under leaves so green

A happy Blossom

Hears you sobbing sobbing

Pretty Pretty Robin

Near my Bosom.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

The Blossom follows the tale of two different birds as well as two different types of love. 'innocent love' as represented in the first stanza and the 'harmful' restrictive love of the second stanza. The lack of an ordered rhyme scheme represents the arbitrary and unpredictable attitude of nature. The actual act of intercourse occurs between the two stanzas and this had lead to red breasted robin - redbreast=broken heart - to be 'sobbing' as a result of the experience. Blake was against the oppression of free love and interlinks the act of sex with nature to show its innocence

| Posted on 2014-05-20 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this poem is very clever, at first I didn\'t understand it and judging by the title I thought it was about birds and nature. But reading it, I realised it is very deceptive hiding the ups and downs of love with the ups and downs of nature and the seasons. The robin has a red breast which is perfect for this poem as it looks like a broken and bleeding heart. It is showing that even though sex is natural and to show love people abuse that and take advantage of that and other peoples feelings, which can lead to broken hearts and so much sadness. It may not mean alot to some but it means a great amount to others.

| Posted on 2011-02-09 | by a guest


.: :.

The sexual act occurs between stanzas. The innocent seeming sparrow becomes sexually experienced, and the robin is left with a broken heart.

| Posted on 2010-02-21 | by a guest


.: :.

i love this man! he has got it down to the nitty gritty! :D although people may say it is SMUT! PURE PURE SMUT!
on the contrary, one may feel that this signifigant poem reflects Willys' views on the love of yesterday and th lack of contraception! =]

| Posted on 2009-04-19 | by a guest


.: :.

The Blossom was one of the most difficult poems to understand out of all of Blake's work. At first coming across as a celebration of nature and innocence but then disintergrating into a more adult subtext.
The poem explores the natural act of sex through a 'sparrow' and a 'robin'. The only reason we see sex as tainted is because we believe it to be so, linking to Blake's dislike of organised religion and his views of pre-conception in 'the Tyger'.
It begins with the innocence of love, 'merry sparrow' and 'swift as arrow'. Perhaps lovers rushing into a union based on irrational thoughts. Whist the second stanza shows the consequences through 'sobbing' and 'pretty robin'. The robin, of course, has a red breast or a broken/bleeding heart. It links closely to Blake's views on free love as apposed to protocol and no sex before marriage.
The unpredictability of the rhyme perhaps creates a parallel to the behaviour of the lovers, irregular and unstable, leaving lingering hurt. Their innocence glazes their views on their love and it is only when they have both experienced one another that they realise their naivity. Irrantionally rushing into the union without thinking, an experienced mind would stop and consider the after effects. Perhaps Blake wants to show how innocent love can be bad. The poem ends with 'near my bosom', perhaps showing that the Blossom has seen many sexual unions or lovers rendezvous and has collected a culmination of experiences, being unable to feel love itself it knows the lovers pain in its heart or bosom. Experience itself being unavoidable, the two lovers grew out of their innocence and felt only pain.

| Posted on 2008-05-20 | by a guest


.: Blake :.

I think it's almost as if Blake is trying to write about some sort of naughty stuff, it's almost as if it's pure smut, pure pure smut!

| Posted on 2008-02-28 | by a guest


.: A different view :.

I feel that the idea of sexual connotation is too heavily emphasised within analysis, and that this poem is a lot more innocent; in my mind, the idea of the sparrow being happy and content with the blossom is shown by the fact that it is free, as writer beckons the sparrow to 'seek your cradle narrow near my bosom', whereas the robin is seemingly trapped in embrace ('Pretty Pretty Robin Near my Bosom'), and so cannot explore the delights of the blossom. Of course, many more things can then in turn be read into this, but I feel that the main message of the poem is that to be free to experience life is the greatest treasure of all, and that too many people try to hold life in their hands instead of just marvelling in its beauty.

| Posted on 2007-10-15 | by a guest


.: A different view :.

I feel that the idea of sexual connotation is too heavily emphasised within analysis, and that this poem is a lot more innocent; in my mind, the idea of the sparrow being happy and content with the blossom is shown by the fact that it is free, as writer beckons the sparrow to 'seek your cradle narrow near my bosom', whereas the robin is seemingly trapped in embrace ('Pretty Pretty Robin Near my Bosom'), and so cannot explore the delights of the blossom. Of course, many more things can then in turn be read into this, but I feel that the main message of the poem is that to be free to experience life is the greatest treasure of all, and that too many people try to hold life in their hands instead of just marvelling in its beauty.

| Posted on 2007-10-15 | by a guest


.: Image :.

It is easy to forget the sexual connotations that are present in this poem, the childish imagery and rhymthm/rhyme decieve the reader from what Blake was really trying to portray. His views on 'free love' as opposed to the conventional form of marriage. The 'Merry Sparrow' could be interpretated literally, as well as the 'Pretty Robin'. Do these two very contrasting images actually stand for two people in the act of sexual intercourse. Note the 'cradle narrow' and the 'swift as arrow'... the 'blossom' stands for the pleasure, orgasm, culmination of the sexual act. Blake is going against the conforms of ideal relationships here.

Now obviously these views only make up a small part of what he was trying to show in his portrayal of the two contrary states of the human soul. We must not forget his personal letter, written in 1799 which included "That which can be made explicit to the idiot is not worth my care"

| Posted on 2007-05-28 | by a guest


.: Blossom annotation :.

The Blossom is a particulary interesting poem; firstly, the difference to that of the 'sparrow' and the 'robin' is the seasons. This is then heightened by the use of 'pretty, pretty' and 'sobbing, sobbing'. The movement of the poem is imnese as if it is a cycle of life. However, 'see's you swift as narrow, seek your cradle narrow' has several connotational references to a sexual relationship. The fact that it is firstly portrayed as being something 'pretty, pretty' represents Blake's thoughts of sex being natural, just like the seasons. However, references to 'sobbing, sobbing' highlights other poems such as the 'Sick Rose', suggesting that although sex is a natural and imitate loving action, it can be taken advantaged of and become something quite sinicister and destructive. The use of the birds, the sparrow and the robin, reinforces this idea; The sparrow is naturally beautiful, just like sex is supposed to be, where as this contrasts to the robin which is similarly natural but tainted with red, a colour often used to describe pain, 'near my bosom'.

| Posted on 2007-05-24 | by a guest


.: the blossom :.

The title Blossom, suggests spring and new life or a time of change. The speaker wants happiness but is aware of the sadness, moving the poem to experience.
At first the poem appears joyful, with the repetition of, "merry, merry." When reading further into the poem, "sees you swift as arrow" suggests a sense of urgency as the A has been missed out, the enjambment also adds to this rushed feeling the poem creates.
When you read, "sobbing sobbing," it becomes more apparent the poem is written on a more negative approach, and suggests a underlying note of sadness that wasn't originally clear. "Near my bosom," further suggests that the sadness is close to heart, suggesting it is hidden and cannot be seen through the speakers exterior.
I feel the poem suggests that beauty (pretty pretty) can give you sadness, and dosn't make you happy as is suggested by many.

| Posted on 2007-05-15 | by a guest


.: :.

The explosion of the senses - birds 'sobbing' moving as swift as 'an arrow' Blake presents to us the countryside that we choose to ignore in our busy city lives. The strong emphasis on nature could also signify the blooming of spring and this has connotations of a sexual nature. Blake however, has loaded this idea with innocent and natural nouns i.e the 'Blossom' and is consequently saying that sex is only seen as corrupt and dirty because we are made to feel ashamed about it. Infact, it is the most natural thing in the world and nature too, celebrates this fact.

| Posted on 2004-09-18 | by Approved Guest




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