famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

Church Going Analysis



Author: Poetry of Philip Larkin Type: Poetry Views: 4674

Once I am sure there's nothing going on

I step inside, letting the door thud shut.

Another church: matting, seats, and stone,

And little books; sprawlings of flowers, cut

For Sunday, brownish now; some brass and stuff

Up at the holy end; the small neat organ;

And a tense, musty, unignorable silence,

Brewed God knows how long. Hatless, I take off

My cycle-clips in awkward reverence,

Move forward, run my hand around the font.

From where I stand, the roof looks almost new-

Cleaned or restored? Someone would know: I don't.

Mounting the lectern, I peruse a few

Hectoring large-scale verses, and pronounce

"Here endeth" much more loudly than I'd meant.

The echoes snigger briefly. Back at the door

I sign the book, donate an Irish sixpence,

Reflect the place was not worth stopping for.Yet stop I did: in fact I often do,

And always end much at a loss like this,

Wondering what to look for; wondering, too,

When churches fall completely out of use

What we shall turn them into, if we shall keep

A few cathedrals chronically on show,

Their parchment, plate, and pyx in locked cases,

And let the rest rent-free to rain and sheep.

Shall we avoid them as unlucky places?Or, after dark, will dubious women come

To make their children touch a particular stone;

Pick simples for a cancer; or on some

Advised night see walking a dead one?

Power of some sort or other will go on

In games, in riddles, seemingly at random;

But superstition, like belief, must die,

And what remains when disbelief has gone?

Grass, weedy pavement, brambles, buttress, sky,A shape less recognizable each week,

A purpose more obscure. I wonder who

Will be the last, the very last, to seek

This place for what it was; one of the crew

That tap and jot and know what rood-lofts were?

Some ruin-bibber, randy for antique,

Or Christmas-addict, counting on a whiff

Of gown-and-bands and organ-pipes and myrrh?

Or will he be my representative,Bored, uninformed, knowing the ghostly silt

Dispersed, yet tending to this cross of ground

Through suburb scrub because it held unspilt

So long and equably what since is found

Only in separation -- marriage, and birth,

And death, and thoughts of these -- for whom was built

This special shell? For, though I've no idea

What this accoutred frowsty barn is worth,

It pleases me to stand in silence here;A serious house on serious earth it is,

In whose blent air all our compulsions meet,

Are recognised, and robed as destinies.

And that much never can be obsolete,

Since someone will forever be surprising

A hunger in himself to be more serious,

And gravitating with it to this ground,

Which, he once heard, was proper to grow wise in,

If only that so many dead lie round.






Sponsor


122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Please answer this question !
How does the poet describe the content of the church ?

| Posted on 2014-05-05 | by a guest


.: :.

Please answer this question !
How does the poet describe the content of the church ?

| Posted on 2014-05-05 | by a guest


.: :.

Church Going who probably written by Larkin to provide an image of an ordinary Englishman who is concerned with an gradual decline in the importance of religion after the World War II.
He also wants to convey the message that the idea of the church becoming obslete is rare and its importance is eternal and men will keep on coming to the church for all the occasions such as birth, marriage,death etc. or just to become serious as mentioned by Larkin in the poem.

| Posted on 2012-12-17 | by a guest


.: :.

the tilte has three different implications which all have been elaborated in the poem. the first is the simple idea of going to church as a ritual done by the Christains, the second one is that the curch is going, that is fading form the life of the poeple. and the third is that the church as standing for a spiritual need in everyone\'s life is still going one and alive as it is a necesstrity that everyonre feels in some time of their life.

| Posted on 2012-07-16 | by a guest


.: :.

dz poem tells about the people who are not turning to church until there is some rituals . the view of the poet is right ,nowadays many church are change into hotels because of people not turning there

| Posted on 2012-03-25 | by a guest


.: :.

dz poem tells about the people who are not turning to church until there is some rituals . the view of the poet is right ,nowadays many church are change into hotels because of people not turning there

| Posted on 2012-03-25 | by a guest


.: :.

This is wonderful poem in its meaning and deep thought of the poet.larkin pin points the materailistic habits of man towards his religious tradition that has become just an activity for them

| Posted on 2012-01-07 | by a guest


.: :.

in this poem philip questions the importance of a place as holy as a churchin the life of a common man. his tone is very sceptical in the beginnig. he draws a very deserted and unimpressive picture of a church he visits.

| Posted on 2011-06-01 | by a guest


.: :.

September 07, 2010
Philip Larkin’s Church Going describes the idle curiosity of the poet/speaker for a church he comes across while out for a bike ride. It consists of 7 stanzas, each 9 lines in length.The meter is a relaxed iambic pentameter. The rhyme scheme is ababcbdgb with numerous slant rhymes appearing in lines 5 – 9. The language is typical of Larkin - ordinary, conversational, almost slangy.
The speaker wants to be sure there is nothing in the way of a church service going on. He appears more interested in the building than in the movement that brought it about. He demonstrates awkward reverence removing his hat and cuff clips. Apparently he has stopped at a number of churches. He describes this one as “Another church” and makes note of “matting, seats, and stone,/ And little books, sprawlings of flowers cut/ For Sunday, brownish now.” He seems uninterested in the denomination of the church.
In stanza 2 he moves forward, rubbing a hand over the baptismal font, speculating on the condition of the roof, climbs the lectern and says, “Here endeth” more loudly than he had intended to. Returning to the entrance, he signs the guest book and contributes a foreign coin to the collection box, thinking the place was not worth stopping for.
In stanza 3 he questions his curious habit of stopping at churches. Once they have become totally useless, will officials keep open some cathedrals and leave the smaller churches to rain and sheep? Will cathedrals become tourist traps and these smaller churches become attractions for ruin seekers, antique hounds, and mothers perpetuating superstitions and seeking simples (medicinal plants) to cure cancer?
It becomes clear that the title has more than one meaning. Churches were built for the once large numbers of believers who attended every Sunday, but those numbers are rapidly reducing themselves. Marriages are gradually shifting to legal events performed by lay people if indeed people don’t merely choose to live together without ceremony. The same situation is replacing the elaborate requiems and funerals of earlier ages. As time goes on, the Church is playing a role of less importance in society, politics, and world events. Finally there are people like the poet/speaker - curious but not trained in history or architecture – who are church goers but are unencumbered by religion.
The Church may be said to be going fast. Still Larkin’s speaker (who speaks for Larkin) cannot totally reject the human religious movement that dominated history until the twentieth century. ‘A serious house on serious earth it is.” And think of all the many dead who lie round.

| Posted on 2011-04-04 | by a guest


.: :.

In my view, Philip Larkin is trying to answer a simple question : \"What is the meaning of the Church/Religion?\", rather the meaning of life. And this question is answered towards the end of the poem, i.e., Religion is not only for rituals. As we see in Stanza 7, Larkin mentions that people would only come to Church in times of separation - Marriage, Birth and death, as each have a certain number of rituals to be performed before concluding the event. And people come only to attend these rituals, and not to connect with God.
In my view, The true reason for religion is to establish a deep, spiritual connection with God. But this idea has been long forgotten by Humanity, and this is very much visible in this poem.
I am not a lover of literature, but this one poem is truly a remarkable one. Such deep a meaning hidden between the lines, but so subtly expressed.

| Posted on 2011-03-28 | by a guest


.: :.

In my view, Philip Larkin is trying to answer a simple question : \"What is the meaning of the Church/Religion?\", rather the meaning of life. And this question is answered towards the end of the poem, i.e., Religion is not only for rituals. As we see in Stanza 7, Larkin mentions that people would only come to Church in times of separation - Marriage, Birth and death, as each have a certain number of rituals to be performed before concluding the event. And people come only to attend these rituals, and not to connect with God.
In my view, The true reason for religion is to establish a deep, spiritual connection with God. But this idea has been long forgotten by Humanity, and this is very much visible in this poem.
I am not a lover of literature, but this one poem is truly a remarkable one. Such deep a meaning hidden between the lines, but so subtly expressed.

| Posted on 2011-03-28 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem was written during the mid 1900\'s, a time when people began losing faith in God and religion and felt less necessary the need for attending church services. Larkin tries to express his own hunger for satisfaction through the poem, going from church to church in search of truth - purpose of the existence of such a building. he donates an Irish six pence before leaving which could be interpreted in two ways. Either he felt that the place was useless to him in his quest and gave it some thing that had no value of currency at that time; or he felt that it did have something to offer as in those days though irish six pence had no monetary value, it was commonly given as a gift. what remains when disbelief is gone: grass, signifying the earth on which we are born;weedy pavement - the path we must tread which is not smooth and full of brambles and thorns along the way; buttress referring to the church and religion which gives us hope and strength to continue on and the sky - heavens- our ultimate goal through all the struggle.

| Posted on 2011-03-26 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem \"Church going\" is very close to reality.Human beings have lost their spirituality and churches have lost their actual purpose for which they were built.

| Posted on 2011-03-14 | by a guest


.: :.

I think you are not worthy enough to write about this . writer. I do admire literature, but hate what he has said in the Church going. an opinion.

| Posted on 2011-02-22 | by a guest


.: :.

I\'m an atheist. I\'ve known this poem for a while now, and I keep coming back to it. I think I know exactly what Larking means when he describes the two-way pull of stepping into and old church. I feel alienated and unsatisfied by the religious trappings, but must remember that this is the place where all of the important things of life have been focussed for centuries. That leaves a tangible atmosphere to the place, even though I can\'t go along with it; it\'s just not good enough any more. Disbelief does not offer this warm, easy comfort of ancient solidity and community acceptance, but a cooler and fresher take on the important things. For me, the poem shows that we can never completely get rid of our in-built sense of something beyond ourselves, even if we know it\'s not really there. A great piece of work, I think.

| Posted on 2011-02-11 | by a guest


.: :.

Quick note, hope it helps.
Notice that he donates an irish sixpence, to an english church.
At the time, Irish currency wasn\'t accepted in the UK, and couldn\'t even be converted to STG at a bank. Why did he do this? Its useless to the church??

| Posted on 2011-01-13 | by a guest


.: :.

Huh? Others seemed to have really missed wide the mark on this one. This poem expresses two sentiments…
…that though we may do away with religion and perhaps even the idea of god, we will always value \"transcendence and the luminous,\" as Another has pointed out.
…and that there will happen upon each the need to seriously answer what religion once so easily answered for some of us—What is the meaning of (my) life?
ag

| Posted on 2010-12-14 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem appears apparently quaint but indeed it has an universal appeal.It reflects the poets dilemma and how his religion and religiosity works.It is a warm reminder of the maxim \"Faith can move mountains\".

| Posted on 2010-08-29 | by a guest


.: :.

Church going starts in an objective tone which changes into a flux between disbelief and belief as the poem progresses. The loss of spirituality and the profound sense of alienation comes out as the religious verses cannot provide any consolation to the poet. Yet he cannot deny religion entirely that is why he returns again and again only to be frustrated each time.

| Posted on 2010-07-09 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe 'Church Going' is a poem symbolizing the change in society's views towards churches.

| Posted on 2010-05-11 | by a guest


.: :.

Philip larkin gives vent to his agnostic delimma through the poem 'Church Going'A modern disillusioned man visits church to show awakward reverence,silence of church does not lend any peace but is tense and unignorable.As a sheer practice he laudly pronounces verses without feeling a sense of belongingness.In an unconventional way he ponders about the future of church and does not hesitate in proclaiming his own assumption that they might fall completely out of use.

| Posted on 2010-04-22 | by a guest


.: :.

we can say here that this poem is a veiled plea in support of churchs n religion!.

| Posted on 2009-10-11 | by a guest


.: :.

Do not all the human of modern age feel insecured? Which can fight better against it than the soothing feeling that an Emmense Power called God will help us? And abode of god is Church. But the intellectual and escapist modern man doubts of God's presence there and so whenever they go and pray there those rituals seem meaningless and hopeless.So another frustration!

| Posted on 2009-10-10 | by a guest


.: :.

Phillip Larkin here points out the church, the objects inside and the ritual are only earthy things. From his lay point of view he is able to make us see that the church and the ritual are not particularly special in themselves and will surcome to elements eventually. Comments such as 'brass and stuff' are born of the fact that he does not believe them to be sacred. In fact the start of the poem makes it look as though Larkin is not a spiritual man at all. His actions and thoughts in the church showed him to be an outsider to the whole business. The end of the poem shows that he is not completely without spiritual thought. His view of religion is that man wants wants time to be 'silent' 'grow wise' and fulfill 'a hunger in himself to be more serious'. Visiting the church made him realise that such places were built for this purpose.

| Posted on 2009-09-19 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem expresses larkins view that the church is a mundane place that has lost its true religious meaning. In the beggining of the poem he ponders over the dissapearance of the church and religion into superstition. However in the second hald of the poem he beggins to question what our existance would be without religion, he acknowledges that people may lack knowledge of faith yet still believe. He is trying to asnwer a rhetorical question that suggests that religion is unnnessecary yet we all feel we need something bigger than ourselves to believe in.

| Posted on 2009-05-06 | by a guest


.: :.

I think it was just a man who wrote about how he thinks church has gotten boring and in the end it will turn out to be just a building. However, the author missed the meaning of church completely in that it isn't a building it is a body of believers. I believe this is all he is trying to say and that poems are analyzed in depth too much these days anyway. Are all the analysis' out there really what the original authors had in mind

| Posted on 2009-04-08 | by a guest


.: :.

Simply a man admiring the fears of man. The church is the "rock" which man rubs when he his fears arize. He correctly summizes that there will always be some sort of rock, whether it be barn shaped or not. Larkin is masterful in walking the line between the believers and non-beleivers without calling out either side. This adds genius to this poem!

| Posted on 2008-11-28 | by a guest


.: :.

All in all I think the speaker undermines his own earlier statements. At first he's caught up in the idea of the death of religion, but comes to admit that the basic experiences and feelings behind religion will never go away. Which of course means that religion in some form or other will always be around.
All in all a wonderful statement of the ambivalent feelings of some of us who aren't really church goers but still feel some vague need for religion and more than a little chagrin at the thought that it may die out. Can't help but think of it ever time I step inside some old European cathedral. Even if the place was worth stopping for. On the other hand, it isn't as instantly memorable as some of Larkin's other poems nor does it have their snap. Then again snarky wit probably isn't the right attitude to approach what Larkin has in mind here.

| Posted on 2008-10-02 | by a guest


.: Spirituality :.

The depiction of reverence while still thinking he is wasting time is a interesting irony. Larkin is analyzing his own confused feelings about religion.

| Posted on 2008-04-04 | by a guest


.: :.

in the literal meaning the poem describes the experience of a lay man while he visits the church, unknowing of the actual meaning of the various rituals involved. the poet questions these traditions and their uses. he tries to imagine what may happen when churches fall completely out of use and who will be the last person to visit it? he answers his own questions; the more he analyzes and searches for the use of the building called church the more meaningful the church actually seems to him. at the last part he finds out that there will always be need for a building like that of a church, not for the superstitions or traditions involved, but for the necessity of a place to go to become more wiser as he describes it, or the necessity of a place where we might go when we are compelled by a grave situation or to understand the deeper meaning of life.

| Posted on 2007-11-21 | by a guest


.: :.

i thought this poem was thought provoking, with the questionable critique of a church and discussing it from an architech's point of view, completely unmasking the true meaning of a church. I thought though that this poem was better than some of his other works, as more and more people enjoy the poem with every stanza. However, the length of the poem works against itself as it just seems to be getting more boring and more boring. Overall, fantastic peom.

| Posted on 2004-12-05 | by Approved Guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

Church Going Analysis Philip Larkin critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Church Going Analysis Philip Larkin Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Church Going Analysis Philip Larkin itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education homework forum help



Poetry 172
Poetry 148
Poetry 40
Poetry 157
Poetry 203
Poetry 78
Poetry 93
Poetry 189
Poetry 49
Poetry 155
Poetry 152
Poetry 75
Poetry 173
Poetry 208
Poetry 180
Poetry 31
Poetry 42
Poetry 174
Poetry 33
Poetry 158