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Some keep the Sabbath going to Church Analysis



Author: Poetry of Emily Dickinson Type: Poetry Views: 4408

Some keep the Sabbath going to Church-

I keep it, staying at Home-

With a Bobolink for a Chorister-

And an Orchard, for a Dome-Some keep the Sabbath in Surplice-

I just wear my Wings-

And instead of tolling the Bell, for Church,

Our little Sexton-sings.God preaches, a noted Clergyman-

And the sermon is never long,

So instead of getting to Heaven, at least-

I'm going, all along.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

this poem basically says to talk to go but not talk to churches

| Posted on 2012-11-24 | by a guest


.: :.

This is just overall a marveolus poem. She turned her swag up when she was writing this great poem. You go girl. She expresses her inner feelings about the church. She did them on this poem

| Posted on 2010-11-16 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe that Emily expressed the truer nature of humanism, existance itself in a natural world is real and tactile whereas "faith" in the formal sense is only institutional and monochromatic.

| Posted on 2010-07-07 | by a guest


.: :.

Emily has totally faith in her own divinity beliefs. She does not claim any lack of faith; she just points out that everybody should have the choice to talk to God as they want. She does not believe that people will be saved by going to church or by confessing. There is actually another poem which she questions the idea of cofessing and God... "Of God we ask one favor,/that we may be forgiven-/ For what, he is presumed to know.
If God really knows everything, what's the point in confessing...unless he is not what we think he is...
Daniely from Brazil

| Posted on 2010-01-29 | by a guest


.: :.

emily has totally faith in her own divinity beliefs. She does not claim any lack of faith; she just points out that everybody should have the choice to talk to God as they want. She does not believe that people will be saved by going to church or by confessing. There is actually another poem which she questions the idea of cofessing and God... "Of God we ask one favor,/that we may be forgiven-/ For what, he is presumed to know.
If God really knows everything, what's the point in confessing...unless he is not what we think he is...
Daniely from Brazil

| Posted on 2010-01-29 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem can be seen in many different ways. My most understandable view is that the poem is saying you don't have to go to church to be religious and that you can have a perfectly healthy religious experience at home or outside in the nature of your backyard. :)

| Posted on 2010-01-18 | by a guest


.: :.

emily believes that nature/God is her true teacher and that she isent waiting for heaven to come, but its been with her "all along".
in this poem, she is expressing some Transcendentalist views.
i think she's awesome but alittle confusing at times.

| Posted on 2009-12-20 | by a guest


.: :.

you all have this all wrong about the poem she is basically saying that instead of going to church and listening to a preacher preach she would rather listen to god preach and she is using nature and saying that she hears god through nature haha i learned that in english class today(:

| Posted on 2009-09-30 | by a guest


.: :.

you all have this all wrong about the poem she is basically saying that instead of going to church and listening to a preacher preach she would rather listen to god preach and she is using nature and saying that she hears god through nature haha i learned that in english class today(:

| Posted on 2009-09-30 | by a guest


.: :.

Why do people do this. It states at the top of this page that these post are for our analysis/critique of the poem, not to judge what other people write. Stay on topic and let readers of these posts decide what they want to believe for themselves.

| Posted on 2009-09-26 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that she is saying that people who devote only an hour of their lives to "being good" by going to listen to god preach in a church are taking a short cut in a sense. "So instead of going to heaven at least."
while she is going all along. She has not confined worship to a defined time by setting aside an isolated time which going to church often tends to do.

| Posted on 2009-08-08 | by a guest


.: :.

Emily is just expressing her own opinion about the church. She is just as happy praising God at home by herself as she would be in a crowded church.

| Posted on 2009-05-19 | by a guest


.: this poem :.

This poem basically says that she has no time for God and she would rather stay at home and worship.

| Posted on 2008-02-26 | by a guest


.: :.

Habit is the enemy of love and true understanding. When people start to do something just because they have been doing it for years and others have been doing it for centuries before them, they lose the meaning and the true spirit that may lie in there. The first time you lick an ice cream it is more delicious that when you tounge gets used to it.

There is a delicate satire and profound mysticism in this poetry. People start going to church and listen to the preacher to reach God then when they simply do it as a habit God has to be a preacher to draw the people's attention.

Love defies mere habits and let us sometimes think why we do something instead of being careful only about how we do it.

Alireza Tagharreh from Iran

| Posted on 2007-07-21 | by a guest


.: Liam Turley - commentary :.

In Some keep the Sabbath going to Church, I see that "God preaches, a noted clergy man" means that God is the preacher. Therefore, she has the best clergy man there is. Who better to preach then God?

God's sermon is never long suggests that all that is truly important can be said in a short time. The poet views the lessons of life and purpose as being easy to understand and without the need for legenthy

Heaven isn't viewed as a reward in this poem, because that would be a self centered reason to be a christian/sabbath keeper. Instead, the poet sees that beauty, pure existance is worship to God. The poet can consider his/her environment to be heaven. This is especially true because Emily Dickinson referred to herself as a pagan.



| Posted on 2007-05-07 | by a guest


.: :.

Unfortunately Ms. Grube is probably confusing a Christian holiday such as Christmas, with pagan origins. The Sabbath was observed by prophets since the time of Adam and Eve. The children of Israel set aside what we would call Saturday, as the Sabbath. It has always been reserved as a day of rest to those who observe it. The poem is not trying to convey a oneness with nature, but rather it is implying that one can be spiritual and observe the Sabbath in ways other attending a religious service. However, Dickinson's view of religion seems limited at best. She describes that she has God as her clergyman, which in effect shows there is not clergy needed for communion with the divine. This is a very limitied view of Christianity and religion. Many denominations clearly accept and even encourage individual correspondence with the divine. The "middleman" is not a necessity in many Christian religions and merely acts as a guide or a counsel in communication, not the source of it.

| Posted on 2006-07-10 | by Approved Guest


.: The Sabbath :.

I would like to write an analysis on Ms. Grube's comment that, "The Sabbath began as a Pagan holiday..." Unfortunately for Ms. Grube she has no knowledge whatsoever of the historic origins of the Sabbath. The Sabbath predates Christianity by almost 1000 years as a God-directed requirement among the momotheistic Hebrews. Christians, especially the very first ones, the Disciples of Christ himself, kept the Hebrew Sabbath as Jesus did. With the development of Catholicism, the day of the Sabbath's observance changed from Friday/Saturday to Sunday, but only a very inaccurate revisionist reconstruction of history could ever have attributed the Sabbath to any pagan origin. I would respectfully suggest that you do some further reader, and use conjecture much less.

Scott A. Shapiro

| Posted on 2005-09-09 | by Approved Guest


.: analysis by kate grube :.

Emily, in this poem, is once again displaying her desire to be unorthodox and her success in doing so. While many people choose to celebrate the Sabbath in a church, she sees this as a waste of time and not truly appreciating the Sabbath at all. The Sabbath began as a Pagan holiday celebrating the turn of the seasons, regardless of the Christian connotation it now has. So, in staying true to the original essence of the Sabbath, Emily enjoys nature and experiences all it has to offer. Contrary to this, of course, is staying cooped up inside a stuffy building, listening to someone talk about things you’ll hear a million times over before you die. Moreover, instead of listening to someone worship God for her, she will do it directly and have her own relationship, eliminating the clerical middleman. Emily, finally, concludes that she won’t stop her life to worship when she could be doing it equally well at home. Even if she doesn’t get to Heaven, she proclaims, at least she will have had a full life instead of life that’d been frittered away in a Church.

| Posted on 2005-01-17 | by Approved Guest




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