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Traveling Through The Dark Analysis



Author: Poetry of William Stafford Type: Poetry Views: 3205

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Traveling through the dark I found a deer

dead on the edge of the Wilson River road.

It is usually best to roll them into the canyon:

that road is narrow; to swerve might make more dead.By glow of the tail-light I stumbled back of the car

and stood by the heap, a doe, a recent killing;

she had stiffened already, almost cold.

I dragged her off; she was large in the belly.My fingers touching her side brought me the reason--

her side was warm; her fawn lay there waiting,

alive, still, never to be born.

Beside that mountain road I hesitated.The car aimed ahead its lowered parking lights;

under the hood purred the steady engine.

I stood in the glare of the warm exhaust turning red;

around our group I could hear the wilderness listen.I thought hard for us all--my only swerving--,

then pushed her over the edge into the river.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

It represents nature and industrialism. Its deep deeper than your mum

| Posted on 2015-05-12 | by a guest


.: :.

i think that the poem was sad. Why does it mean anything. He killed a fawn and should have run of the road too. Buy cookies. SALAD!!!

| Posted on 2012-12-04 | by a guest


.: :.

i think this poem is all about the comparison of nature and science. the dead doe is the mother earth and the fawn inside it represents the living matter on earth who because of the increasing use of technology and the sophisticated life here reperesented by road and the car, have had a huge destruction and damage in their lives.

| Posted on 2011-04-30 | by a guest


.: :.

This kid in my 3rd Block things he is a Badass his name is tyler

| Posted on 2011-03-22 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this poem is about a person’s journey in life and the tough decisions that we have to make and the consequences that comes with these decisions that we make. also you never know what you are going to get from it.

| Posted on 2011-03-22 | by a guest


.: :.

it is a very nice poem about the comparison of both species man and animal traveling through the dark and that is just what life is about thanks you guys

| Posted on 2011-02-07 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem written by William Stafford is one of the famous american poet. He narrates the great tension between two realities. Two systems of life through the poem\' travell-
ing through the dark:
One night while he was driving a car through mountainous road, at the side of the wilson river he saw a deceased dear which was pregnant. He dragged it at the edge. He touched it and felt like it was not cold. He felt like her fawn is still alive. A baby deer was waiting the time to come out,since its mother was deceased the poet was unable to do anything because he was in the mountain at night time. He was standing infront of his car, suddenly he heard a cry and poked dat deceased body of deer into the wilson river.
The main theme of the story is sense of emotion and responsibility. The poet means to say sometimes the sense of emotion is more than the sense of duty.
The tone of the poem is ironical. It gives satire to them who drive the vehicles carelessly on the narrow of the road and kill those innocent animals. on the other hand, it arises our sympathy towards the unborn baby deer. The poem means to day that every creature has been given a chance to survive by the god. So killing those animals is like a crime !!
- Eye on the G
- Who contend like a warrior !!

| Posted on 2011-01-20 | by a guest


.: :.

This Poem is basically about mans journey in life and the tough decisions that we have to face and the consequences that comes with these decisions that we make.It also makes us aware of the challenges that we face and if we give up on life when we cant deal with them.

| Posted on 2010-10-17 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem depicts a man faced with a difficult moral decision to make. He chooses to kill the unborn fawn which I think is VERY WRONG!!!!

| Posted on 2010-10-17 | by a guest


.: :.

I think is really more about the man/ technology vs. nature theme than the moral decision making part. The man is on a road, representative of human technology, that sticks out into the wilderness. This intersection between "us" (our cars, roads, etc.) and nature(the deer, the woods, the river) is the major conflict of the poem. The man sees a tragic example of our expansion killing an innocent deer and fawn, and hesitates before pushing the deer off the road and into the canyon. I think this view of the poem is what stafford envisioned... i really do not see evidence of the "human choice" aspect

| Posted on 2010-06-03 | by a guest


.: :.

Guys this poem is not difficult to understand. those who are talking about nuclear bombs and the choice between life and death, and humanity are all over analysing. First of all you are not taking into account the title of the poem. The poem is called "Travelling through the dark" He makes beutiful parallels throughout the poem and this is the first. He is not only saying that he is travelling through the dark in his car (meaning he can not see past what his headlights show him) but he is comparing the fawn in the mother's stomach to this aswell. It is just a passenger in the mothers womb and it is travelling through the dark. Travelling through the dark is really the point of this entire poem as he is saying that life is like travelling through the dark. We never know when death is coming or what obstacles may be in our future.
Also i would just like to point out an incredible parallel that he made. He says:
"The car aimed ahead its lowered parking lights;
under the hood purred the steady engine.
I stood in the glare of the warm exhaust turning red;"
this is absolutly incredible writting. The cars lights lowered signifies the dead doe's eyes pointing towards the pavement. The engine purring beneath the hood of his car signifies the fawn still alive in her mothers womb. And the exhust turning red as it passes the tailights not only is a beutiful image but it signifies the doe's blood.

| Posted on 2010-05-09 | by a guest


.: :.

I love the personification of the headlights. "Under the hood purred the steady engine./I stood in the glare of the warm exhaust turning red;" The animal is bleeding, dying slowing, the car purring, the blood spreading.

| Posted on 2010-03-08 | by a guest


.: :.

For real everybody!!! look at the mans back ground and the time period!! he was alive during world war 2 and served in the military!! ww2 was when the us developed nuclear weapons!! and in his background it talks about how close he was to nature! wellll.... this is all a metaphor about how the nuclear bombs were harming nature!! look it up noo lieee. He was afraid that modern technology would harm the wilderness." the car aimed ahead" is symbolizes the weapons," I could hear the wilderness listening" ! see the connection

| Posted on 2010-01-07 | by a guest


.: :.

For real everybody!!! look at the mans back ground and the time period!! he was alive during world war 2 and served in the military!! ww2 was when the us developed nuclear weapons!! and in his background it talks about how close he was to nature! wellll.... this is all a metaphor about how the nuclear bombs were harming nature!! look it up noo lieee. He was afraid that modern technology would harm the wilderness." the car aimed ahead" is symbolizes the weapons," I could hear the wilderness listening" ! see the connection

| Posted on 2010-01-07 | by a guest


.: :.

Questions and Answers from a 20-1 course:
(Just trying to broaden the search results on the web so, if you let any of my answers assist you in anything, or if you agree with me reply to questions, give feedback and like me ask others to do so to. Thanks!)
Explain what the moral dilemma was, and what he chose?
The speaker is forced to make a morally tough decision. He must either kill an unborn deer or chance his or someone elses life. After consideration he pushes the doe into the canyon.
Did he make the right choice?
(this is a personal answer, but heres mine)
The matter-of-fact attitude the speaker has makes it easy for me to agree with his secision. He tried to find another way out of this moral dilemma and so I am of the same mind.
Reread the 4th verse. Whats the contrast?
In contrast to the dead doe, in verse 4 personification is used to decribe the mans car. He thinks about the issue of others dieing, like they have before on that road.
In the second last line, "I thought hard for us all" What does this mean?
The narrator is acting for us all through his choice. He is preventing further faital accidents. The unborn deer has a warm comforting death apose to one filled with cold lonesome nights and starvation.
In the same line the speaker says "only swerving" What does this mean?
The word swerving is has two differnt meanings in this poem. When used in the context "only swerving" the poet means through these words, his hesitation and uncertianty he picks an outcome or "direction".
Is life somewhat like the road hes traveling?
Kufe us ub sine ways like the road he was traveling. Life is unpredictable, likwise the speaker can only see a short distance in front of him in his car in the dark.
How in life might you be travelling through the dark?
The tittle of the poem deals with the difficulty of finding the right path in life...

| Posted on 2009-09-24 | by a guest


.: :.

I think the poem is not about whether or not the narrator's final decision is the right or better one. I think it is about the narrator being forced to choose between life and death. The narrator could choose to attempt to save the fawn, or he can roll the dear into the canyon subsequently killing the fawn but potentialy saving others. He must choose between the fawn and the other people either way he can not be sure he saves anyone, even if he trys he may not be able to save the fawn or leaving the deer there might not cause others to swerve and die. So the narrator must choose death for somone with no garuntee that he is saving anyone.

| Posted on 2009-06-01 | by a guest


.: :.

The truth is this story is about mankinds relationship with nature. His first concern is for humanity and he even finishes the deer off next to his car which almost seems like a steed. i think he didnt do a noble thing even though he can justify it. just shows the cruelty and disregard of nature by humanity.

| Posted on 2009-05-11 | by a guest


.: :.

Why doesn't the man just put the deer in his car and take it to a place where the fawn can be born??
isnt that like one of the most OBVIOUS things to do

| Posted on 2009-05-02 | by a guest


.: :.

lol swapnil..your funny!!...i never did think of the river being the mother..and the whole thing about rebirth...water..river..its true.
in my opinion the deer can symbolize obstacles and problems that are crossing through the speakers life. he decides to set them a part..maybe by teaching other people about his problems and by sharing his stories and errors in life..this way the speaker is helping other people ...he is moving the deer out of the road out of the way so that people will not and cannot encounter accidents and obstacles in life...he has learned from his mistake and wants others to avoid the path he took. He is opening their eyes ...idk..thats what came to my mind right now..i'm just a senior in high school..still got lots to learn =)

| Posted on 2009-01-27 | by a guest


.: A guide :.

The poem 'Traveling Through the Dark' is about a man who was traveling along a road at night when he came upon a dead deer at the edge of the road.
The narrator mentioned that the road was narrow and fatal accidents have already happened along that road 'to swerve might make more dead' so it was usually best to roll the deers into the canyon. On realizing that the deer was pregnant he "hesitated" because he had make a decision on whether he should save the unborn fawn that was still alive in the stomach of the deer.
The poet uses language that appeals to the senses and are sight, hearing and touch.
The car is personified and is portrayed as a weapon "the car aimed ahead", "under the hood purred the steady engine" suggests that an animal has been killed. "The warm exhaust turning red" portrays blood and death. When the narrator mentioned "I thought hard for us all, my only swerving" it meant that he had to make a big decision and he thought for all of mankind, his hesitation and the idea of not knowing what to do was his only swerving.
The title of the poem "Traveling Through the Dark" aside from meaning that the man was literally traveling at night also means confusion, the man is on his own to make a decision, alone in the dark, no one else is there to help him.

| Posted on 2008-05-11 | by a guest


.: :.

To take life away from the living that is already dead to save those won't even know it, is that the right thing to do?

| Posted on 2008-04-07 | by a guest


.: Overview :.

The persona is driving along Wilson River Road, when he comes across a doe lying on the side of the road. He stops, and tells you that normally they push the deer’s off the side because drivers could swerve and be killed. Then he realises that the doe has a fawn in its tummy and it is still alive. He touches her belly and finds it is warm. He now has a decision to make, “the nature listened”. He said he thought “hard for us all”. The persona then demonstrates his responsibility by pondering, he makes an informed decision. He then pushes the deer over into the canyon. He does this too avoid other accidents.

| Posted on 2008-02-25 | by a guest


.: :.

Jamey Albers is the worst Guitar Hero Player Ever. hee hee hee hee hee hee!!!
P.S
He's kinda sensitive about this thing so don't tell i did this

| Posted on 2008-02-22 | by a guest


.: denotations/conotations :.

Notice the use of the word warm it denotes medium temperature but it conotes comfort. Is the narrator comfortable? Note also the gothic setting the classic lonely dark highway. Notice all of the end-stopped lines(finishes with punctuation) these emphasize the final word look at dead and cold. The tone seems almost indifferent to me an almost creepy seperation from feelings for the death of the baby and mother. Although the poem has no formal rhythm it follows a pattern of rise and fall. The reader's hopes seem to rise then suddenly fall. You think the baby might live... but its stillborn. etc. Thank you all this really helped on my explication of this poem.

| Posted on 2008-02-20 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem “Travelling through the Dark” by William Strafford seems simplistic at first although when we look deeper at the symbolic references and the language used as well and some techniques which are included, we see this poem is not simplistic at all.
"Travelling through the Dark" is a representation of life. Many conventions can be plucked from this one poem, one which I have chosen to sight reference to is, life is about reactions and the consequences of those actions.
Firstly I would like to point out the symbolic meaning of the use of the word swerve. It is found twice in the poem and this one word captures the essence of what Stafford is trying to say. To swerve means to go around, to go off your path. It may not be by choice but everyone encounters a situation in life where they must stop and make a choice, they must swerve, go around, take another path. This idea suggests life is uncertain. No one knows what it is ahead. We plan things but the way we perceive our future is never the way it turns out, unexpected events occur and that is where choices need to be made. The decisions we make at that time is what life is about.
The setting is dark. This creates a certain atmosphere, one which is uncertain and filled with suspense and danger. This darkness symbolises the unknown and the uncertainty of what lies ahead. In this same way life has uncertainty to it, life is like the dark road described, we can only see what is right in front of us, we can’t see the future, in the same way you can only see what just in front of a car in darkness due to its headlights.
The car itself also has great symbolic ties. It lies in juxtaposition with the deer. The car has qualities of life although it’s not living; the deer has no life although it is living due to the doe. Personification is used to describe the car as a life like object although it has not life. “under the hood purred the steady engine”. In this section of the poem Stafford explains “the warm exhaust turning red” which to is a reference but this time to life and death. By saying the exhaust is turning red is referencing the death of the deer and is symbolic of blood.
In the end a choice had to be made. Once we see what in front of us we must decide, whether or not what we see is what we had planned. Our decisions have consequences and in this case a choice was made to prevent pain and suffering to others. It is knowledge that if the deer is not moved others will be moved from the road to and with that knowledge a decision is made and the consequential death of the unborn doe occurs. We see what’s in front of us and we react and in following are the consequences.


| Posted on 2007-09-14 | by a guest


.: :.

A key feature should be examined that all seemed to have overlooked. The poem is not as a narrative paragraph, but as a poem. Why did Stafford choose this medium. The answer reveals itself in not the content of the poem, but in that which is not easily discernible. What I mean is, the structure of the poem is purposeful and not spontaneous or based on a rhythm. With that in mind, the first two lines as a regular sentence create the phrase "Traveling through the dark I found a deer dead on the edge of Wilson River road." However, Stafford deliberately separates the lines between deer in dead. What does this mean? In my opinion, this almost explicitly shows that the dear is alive in the first line, and dead in the second. Instead of just finding a dead deer, the narrator has now actually done the killing. It is an incredible idea that confounds the previous ideas on the actual meaning of the poem. The poem's theme of nature versus technology disintegrates at this outlook. But do not ignore other opinions; every one is valid.

| Posted on 2007-08-15 | by a guest


.: it condemns :.

Travelling through the dark by William Stafford is a poem that condemns and exposes the attitude of mankind towards nature and all things organic. Stafford tells of a story that has many meanings but they all come down to one thing. Man having preference for technology over nature.
The first verse starts with the poet travelling along a road beside a canyon and he comes across a dead deer lying on the road. It has to be moved or it may cause more deaths. Stafford’s word choice gives you the idea of his state of mind straight away. He finds the dead deer.
“and stood by the heap”
Already it is clear that he did not show much regard for it. He came across a dead deer lying upon a road and without any thought or consideration the first thing he wants to do is push it off the side. The deer wasn’t anything to him. It was just a heap that happened to be in the way. He didn’t see a dead animal, he saw an obstruction. This is the first message of how the author feels.
After further investigation he realises that the deer is pregnant, and the fawn is still alive. If the deer is pushed over the side of the road the fawn will die. Yet again Stafford’s word choice makes the image clear.
“waiting, alive, still, never to be born”
“Waiting” makes the fawn seem more alive than it actually is. Its heart may be beating but it’s not living its life. It’s like the fawn is peacefully waiting for the decision for whether it will live or die. The driver did think hard for a while but he also uses the words “never to be born.” His mind was made up from the word go, there was no decision in it and in the end he did push the deer and the fawn over the edge of the road. He thought about it so that if ever in the future he felt sorrow or guilt for the fawn he could say to himself at least I thought about it. Stafford wasn’t thinking about what to do, he was making an excuse for himself. He destroyed what was natural and killed the fawn.
Stafford’s poem does an excellent job of highlighting the problem that man is drifting further and further away from its roots. Early man would have lived of nature and its surroundings but now the problem is man has a total disregard for it. It is just wrong that what has the right to be there, a fawn (nature) is destroyed so that man-made mechanical beasts can rampage on. This idea is made especially clear in the last verse.
The car is suddenly given characteristics of an animal. The car “aimed” its’ lights ahead as if it had the choice to. The steady engine “purred” as if the car was quite content. In a way the car is evil. The car is probably how the deer was killed in the first place but in the authors eyes the car is not a killing machine but instead warm and inviting.
Modern technology is tearing nature apart - what man relies on – if it continues perhaps the end for man could be through its own fault and creations. That is what William Stafford brings to our attention.


| Posted on 2007-06-28 | by a guest


.: Form :.

Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Does it add to the meaning?

| Posted on 2006-05-22 | by Approved Guest


.: :.

Traveling Through the Dark"...by William Stafford
Critical analysis Presented by Swapnil Baral


About me...
"Traveling through the dark" is kept on syllabus in 12th grade or senior level of the higher Secondary in Nepal. I happen to read the poem as I am student senior in higher secondary about to leave intermediate level soon...Following is my critical analysis ...please focus on it

Critical Analysis.
Poet happens to encounter a dead doe on the mid road at the dense forest by the river side in the night time. He was supposed to shift the dead animal into the canyon and while he tends to do the same he notices a baby inside the warm belly which was tending to kiss the Earth. But the condition for it was complicated since natural birth was damn impossible and the facilities over there were numberless. Poet swerve his thinking now and he happen to get pity for the kid and his emotions overflowed. At night time in mid forest he was unsafe so his locomotion by replacement of the dead but living system was important and his efficiency was to throw it and move ahead. But poet could not do it with ease. He had heavenly love towards the baby.
The conflict within the poet was between efficiency and emotion. Finally he pushed the doe into the river. Oh God! What he did? Was it the good ending? Wasn't it his mistake?
No it wasn't. Are you surprised? Don't panic! I will explain you why he pushed it into the river; Damn why?

Let us explain the complex part now. He did not throw it into the forest. Instead, he threw into the river. This is because river has certain meaning via which poet shows his desires.
According to Carl Gustav Jung River is the archetype. River in literature by contribution of psychoanalysis has following meanings. It is a transitional period of life, symbol of death and rebirth and so on. Stafford meant to twist or cover his certain concepts by this symbol "the river". The act of throwing her into the river represents the transitional period of life and death. He might as well introduced the desire of rebirth (rebirth since baby is dead as its death is sure) of the baby by pushing it into the river. Furthermore, river is symbol of mother since life in the Earth began from water. Poet kept doe into river, into mother's lap' that is the water. Therefore, river is an archetype symbolizing mother. In this manner Collective Unconscious of Jung explodes. So pushing onto river has vital value.
Literally, we may say that poet favors the efficiency but in fact he favors the emotions and he can never ever forget the feelings he felt about he baby deer. So he does full justice to sides, the emotion and the efficiency.
The title is symbolical as well. Traveling through the dark is a journey in ark made by the poet. It is a real journey made by mankind in dark or in ignorance with mistakes killing innocent animals. The core idea of the poem supports the popular saying of the Nietzsche "God is already dead."

Swapnil Baral
swapnilbaral@gmail.com


| Posted on 2005-04-13 | by Approved Guest


.: :.

A superficial view of life’s problems is often the easiest way to exist. ‘Swerving’, or deviating from that view often pushes against the current of common thought. This experience can be troubling because it forces a person to think independently. In William Stafford’s poem Traveling through the dark the author is untroubled when he finds a dead deer on the side of a canyon road. He accepts it as a common experience, stating “it is usually best to roll them into the canyon.” He then immediately warns us that “to swerve (or to think more deeply about something) might make more dead”
Though initially this may seem like a semi-twisted poem by a man with nothing better to do than to write about his experiences about road kill. If you take a deeper look into the poem, as the poet satirically advises us not to do, you will see that the poet has many meanings in the poem, some intended and some un-intended. At the beginning of the poem when he first finds the deer it is really no big deal and there is no thinking necessary, all that needs t be done is the normal, conformist thing. Then we see that there are different circumstances than normal, the doe that has been killed has a baby still living inside of it. This forces us to try and actually think about things, or as the poet puts it, we have to ‘swerve’.
Then after the deer is dumped into the river, with the baby still in it we are forced to begin to think about why the speaker would just kill an innocent baby. Could it have been saved? If he had been able to get the baby out of the womb would it have made any difference? Could the child have made it in the wild with no mother to guide it? While I do believe that the speaker does the right thing in getting rid of the deer so that no one else will be troubled by it, I think that he gets rid of it for the wrong reason. Although the poem actually states “I thought hard for us all” we really don’t get the feeling that he has thought about the consequences for everyone, even though he tries to convince himself that he has. All he really wants to do is get back to the safety and warmth of his car and go back to not thinking about things while just doing the routine thing.
The poet seems to be mocking this behavior. It seems he is saying that most of the time you can follow the usual way that things are done because there are people who have been there before you and they have done the thinking and found the best easiest way so now you don’t have to. This actually seems to be the way that Stafford (the poet) functioned in life. While he was known for his generally accepting attitude and conformist views he still thought for himself when things became important. For example he was a conscientious objector during World War Two.
His way of looking at life may be the easiest way of all ways to look at life; you do what everyone else does unless it is a matter of importance. The problem with this is how do you know when something is a matter of importance? Does it become important if you can benefit from it? Does it become important when other peoples lives or feelings are at stake? According to this poem it becomes important when it is convenient to you. The speaker wants to get back into his car so he stops thinking about the baby and just does what he always does.
Isn’t this the easiest way to go about life? We just do things to our benefit and only help people when it is convenient for us. In all truth it is the easiest way. As long as you can convince other people that you actually care about what happens to them, even though you don’t. Then they will help you when you are in distress. Although this may be the easiest way to go about life, especially if your goal in life is to just get through life, it is not necessarily the best way. The simple truth is that it becomes very difficult to lead a full life while just conforming to common thought or thinking on your own too much. If you just conform to common thought you would lose your individuality sooner or later. If you just think for yourself, refusing always to conform to common thought you’re going to get a lot of people angry with you who think you are an idiot. For example, you cannot say that you think Charles Dickens or William Shakespeare were bad writers because they don’t hold your attention well. On things like that it is best to just conform even if you can’t understand why they are great authors so that people won’t think of you as uneducated.
The simple truth is that everyone, regardless of whether they will admit it or not, needs people in their lives to have a full and enjoyable life. This poem may not be telling us that directly, but it does tell us that we need to think for ourselves while conforming in some areas also, and we can draw our own conclusions about why this would be a good thing to do.

| Posted on 2005-04-09 | by Approved Guest




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