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To my Dear and Loving Husband Analysis



Author: Poetry of Anne Bradstreet Type: Poetry Views: 2962





If ever two were one, then surely we.

If ever man were loved by wife, then thee;

If ever wife was happy in a man,

Compare with me, ye woman, if you can.

I prize thy love more than whole mines of gold,

Or all the riches that the east doth hold.

My love is such that rivers cannot quench,

Nor aught but love from thee, give recompense.

Thy love is such I can no way repay,

The heavens reward thee manifold, I pray.

Then while we live, in love let's so perservere

That when we live no more, we may live ever.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

One must not judge Anne Bradstreet\'s relationship and say she did not love her husband and say she uses sarcasm. For one thing, you are not the poet. And also, please do not confuse poet with the speaker or persona.
I believe she truly did love him, but she was also Puritan, do there is a certain element of repression. With the lack of speaking about the emotions which are connected with love.
Anyway, here is my analysis. The speaker is sort of tallying up the depth of the love for her husband, but the speaker of the poem approaches her love for him from a Puritan, religious standpoint.
Also, read Bradstreet\'s other poems. There are more poems addressed to her husband and I believe the relationship they had was real, but was somewhat constricted due to their rigorous Puritan beliefs.

| Posted on 2012-10-11 | by a guest


.: :.

Think of the \"if\" Bradsteet says as if this, that that is true. It\'s the same statement that you find in math and I think that you might realize something different about this poem. If the first circumstance is true... then... Try it. : )

| Posted on 2012-04-13 | by a guest


.: :.

She was a Puritan and she did not actually love her husband, she was using figurative language and sarcasm throughout the poem.

| Posted on 2011-10-18 | by a guest


.: :.

Loved the poem and enjoyed the comments. I\'ve got nothing to add, however, I really doubt the notion of her not making this to demonstrate her deep love for his husband, as some have suggested.

| Posted on 2011-05-20 | by a guest


.: :.

I think, too, that this poem is about her love for her husband and I don´t believe that she wanted to challenge him or thought herself equal to her man.
She felt that they belong together \"two were one\", despite the fact that in those times man and woman had different tasks in every day life; she had to raise the children, cook, and so on - while he earned their living. They complemented each other and thus became one.

| Posted on 2011-04-21 | by a guest


.: :.

To me, She does love him, but as a puritan woman she must be very reserved. Her style seems to be very formal, even constricted. I believe that emphasizes the fact she loves him more than she could ever express.

| Posted on 2011-03-24 | by a guest


.: :.

In my opinion, I think that this poem means that she cannot love him or she chooses not too. Simply because of the word \"if\". When you love someone and you want to let they know you do, you do not say \"if\". You only say it when you cannot be together because of some reason. Her reason why, I do not know. All I know or what I think I know is that he loves her, but she does not feel the same.

| Posted on 2011-03-09 | by a guest


.: :.

It is clearly about her love for her husband... The fact that she she says \"two is one\" does not neccessarily mean she sees herself as equal, but as God sees marriage. Marriage (at least as described in the Bible) says two become one flesh. This is what Bradstreet is speaking. The Bible also says nothing can break this bond and being of Puritan views Bradstreet realizes this and also recognizes her husbands love for her as well.

| Posted on 2011-02-08 | by a guest


.: :.

i think you guys are allwrong.. this poem is about corruption and beyonces- single ladies video cuz it was wirrteen j the purtian afe and like so was beyonces video so yeha.. bye his may only be an analysis of the writing. No requests for explanation or general short comments allowed. Due to Spam Posts are moderated before posted.

| Posted on 2010-10-09 | by a guest


.: :.

I am studying this in a Literature class and have learned this means something quite different. Look at some of her other poems and you will soon realize she in fact does not love her husband as the poem seems like she does. She is using anaphora in the first 3 lines with the word \"if\". This emphasizes the fact that it is not possible. Therefore, she is portraying her feelings that love is not real in this poem. She lived in the Puritan Era, so the idea of her and her husband being one is nothing close to reality. They are not equal in any way and he has a great amount of power over her. Comparing her love to money, which means the relationship between her and her husband is shallow and greedy. In addition, she emphasizes the thought of repaying. Love does not repay one another, it appreciates and gives because it wants to. In addition, in the Puritan Era a man would NEVER repay a women. I cannot figure out the entire poem, but I know for a fact she is not writing a love poem. I know this for she does not love her husband as she portrays in her other poems.

| Posted on 2010-08-30 | by a guest


.: :.

I am studying this in a Literature class and have learned this means something quite different. Look at some of her other poems and you will soon realize she in fact does not love her husband as the poem seems like she does. She is using anaphora in the first 3 lines with the word \"if\". This emphasizes the fact that it is not possible. Therefore, she is portraying her feelings that love is not real in this poem. She lived in the Puritan Era, so the idea of her and her husband being one is nothing close to reality. They are not equal in any way and he has a great amount of power over her. Comparing her love to money, which means the relationship between her and her husband is shallow and greedy. In addition, she emphasizes the thought of repaying. Love does not repay one another, it appreciates and gives because it wants to. In addition, in the Puritan Era a man would NEVER repay a women. I cannot figure out the entire poem, but I know for a fact she is not writing a love poem. I know this for she does not love her husband as she portrays in her other poems.

| Posted on 2010-08-30 | by a guest


.: :.

It is always enlightening to observe the context of the poem as well as the text. If we consider the Puritan society in which Bradstreet lived, it can shed a new light upon the meaning of the poem.
\"If ever two were one, then surely we.\"
The very first line reveals that Bradstreet is taking a presumptuous step in considering herself an equal to her husband. We can see the relevence of this when we consider that she was friends with Anne Hutchinson. Who was intellectual, educated and led women’s prayer meetings. She was labeled a heretic and banished from the colony. Hutchinson eventually died in an Indian attack. Puritan women were expected to be reserved, domestic, and subservient to their husbands. They were not expected or allowed to exhibit their wit, charm, intelligence, or passion. John Winthrop, the Massachusetts governor, once remarked that women who exercised wit or intelligence were apt to go insane.
Someone else noted the loneliness in the poem. This is made even more relevant when we consider that she was married to a governor who was constantly traveling. In addition, she bore and raised eight children as well as cooked,cleaned and kept her house. In tis instance, the context truly complements the sense of need for affection.
Just a couple thoughts on context.
~Josh

| Posted on 2010-08-30 | by a guest


.: :.

She talks about the love that she feels for her husband that means everything to her and that she will love him while she lives and after death too because her love is forever and ever as she choosed to feel it.

| Posted on 2009-10-08 | by a guest


.: :.

i think that she is daring any wwoman to love her husband more than god i think that she has to much love for her man that no one can stop her from loving him as much as her.

| Posted on 2009-09-21 | by a guest


.: To My Dear and Loving H :.

I think that this poem clearly demonstrates the love she had for her husband, more so of her desire to love him. I think that she was a real lonely person, and she wrote this poem to show him how much she wanted him to be there with her to spend as much time with her as he could. She clearly demonstrates that she felt she probably didn't get enough love from him, as it explains towards the end of the poem that she says to live as much in life as you can, and the importance of it.

| Posted on 2008-03-12 | by a guest




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