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The Pains Of Sleep Analysis



Author: poem of Samuel Taylor Coleridge Type: poem Views: 49

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Ere on my bed my limbs I lay,

It hath not been my use to pray

With moving lips or bended knees;

But silently, by slow degrees,

My spirit I to Love compose,

In humble trust mine eyelids close,

With reverential resignation,

No wish conceived, no thought expressed,

Only a sense of supplication;

A sense o'er all my soul impressed

That I am weak, yet not unblessed,

Since in me, round me, every where

Eternal strength and wisdom are.



But yester-night I prayed aloud

In anguish and in agony,

Up-starting from the fiendish crowd

Of shapes and thoughts that tortured me:

A lurid light, a trampling throng,

Sense of intolerable wrong,

And whom I scorned, those only strong!

Thirst of revenge, the powerless will

Still baffled, and yet burning still!

Desire with loathing strangely mixed

On wild or hateful objects fixed.

Fantastic passions! maddening brawl!

And shame and terror over all!

Deeds to be hid which were not hid,

Which all confused I could not know

Whether I suffered, or I did:

For all seemed guilt, remorse or woe,

My own or others still the same

Life-stifling fear, soul-stifling shame.



So two nights passed: the night's dismay

Saddened and stunned the coming day.

Sleep, the wide blessing, seemed to me

Distemper's worst calamity.

The third night, when my own loud scream

Had waked me from the fiendish dream,

O'ercome with sufferings strange and wild,

I wept as I had been a child;

And having thus by tears subdued

My anguish to a milder mood,

Such punishments, I said, were due

To natures deepliest stained with sin,—

For aye entempesting anew

The unfathomable hell within

The horror of their deeds to view,

To know and loathe, yet wish and do!

Such griefs with such men well agree,

But wherefore, wherefore fall on me?

To be beloved is all I need,

And whom I love, I love indeed.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

This poem not only explores his withdrawal symptoms and pain. It's harsh reality is further rooted in his unrequited love for Sara Hutchison whom he loved. He was at the time married to another woman.

| Posted on 2016-04-10 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem not only explores his withdrawal symptoms and pain. It's harsh reality is further rooted in his unrequited love for Sara Hutchison whom he loved. He was at the time married to another woman.

| Posted on 2016-04-10 | by a guest


.: :.

Love conquers all again. If he had someone to love, it would make him feel safer, better and life wouldn't be so bad anymore. His sleep pains would subside.

| Posted on 2013-09-09 | by a guest


.: :.

the horrifying dreams he talks bout what are they ?

| Posted on 2013-04-26 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem can be considered as a very personal confession. It is included in what G.M. Harper first called “conversation poems”. The speaker is Coleridge himself and this type of poems are addressed to his beloved friends (Wordsworth, Dorothy Wordsworth…). The poem defines a Coleridge in a particular state of mind at a particular time. The Pains of Sleep was conceived in a trip along Scotland with his friends Wordsworth and Dorothy Wordsworth, in a time that Coleridge was trying to abandon his opium addiction. The poem shows the agony that he experienced in his particular struggle to overcome his addiction.
The poem is divided in three paragraphs, which represent three different nights, with its own atmosphere, so the reader almost visualised it. He used the tetrameter iambic to slow down the poem to increase the sense of pain and agony that he is suffering.

| Posted on 2012-06-06 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is about suffering and Coleridge is trying to express the reality of life.

| Posted on 2012-03-22 | by a guest


.: :.

of course this poem is about his withdrawl, but what is the deeper meaning? this poem isn\'t just about the effects of drugs, it is about life.

| Posted on 2010-10-27 | by a guest


.: :.

His withdrawal to opium persuades the audience to feel negative of drugs considering the speakers addiction to opium

| Posted on 2009-04-21 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe he is speaking of the withdrawal pains of opium. He speaks of the temptations and the pull the drug has, and while he hates the drug, he desires it. As fare as the last four lines go I am lost.

| Posted on 2009-02-12 | by a guest




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