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Two Look At Two Analysis



Author: poem of Robert Frost Type: poem Views: 67

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Love and forgetting might have carried them

A little further up the mountain side

With night so near, but not much further up.

They must have halted soon in any case

With thoughts of a path back, how rough it was

With rock and washout, and unsafe in darkness;

When they were halted by a tumbled wall

With barbed-wire binding. They stood facing this,

Spending what onward impulse they still had

In One last look the way they must not go,

On up the failing path, where, if a stone

Or earthslide moved at night, it moved itself;

No footstep moved it. 'This is all,' they sighed,

Good-night to woods.' But not so; there was more.

A doe from round a spruce stood looking at them

Across the wall, as near the wall as they.

She saw them in their field, they her in hers.

The difficulty of seeing what stood still,

Like some up-ended boulder split in two,

Was in her clouded eyes; they saw no fear there.

She seemed to think that two thus they were safe.

Then, as if they were something that, though strange,

She could not trouble her mind with too long,

She sighed and passed unscared along the wall.

'This, then, is all. What more is there to ask?'

But no, not yet. A snort to bid them wait.

A buck from round the spruce stood looking at them

Across the wall as near the wall as they.

This was an antlered buck of lusty nostril,

Not the same doe come back into her place.

He viewed them quizzically with jerks of head,

As if to ask, 'Why don't you make some motion?

Or give some sign of life? Because you can't.

I doubt if you're as living as you look."

Thus till he had them almost feeling dared

To stretch a proffering hand -- and a spell-breaking.

Then he too passed unscared along the wall.

Two had seen two, whichever side you spoke from.

'This must be all.' It was all. Still they stood,

A great wave from it going over them,

As if the earth in one unlooked-for favour

Had made them certain earth returned their love.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Knowing Frost, I'd say that this poem is exactly what it says. Frost was out walking with a friend in the evening, happened by a field and saw the doe, watched for a while until the buck came along, but because of the typical Vermont stone walls across fields and meadows, was unable to continue their walk up the hill. So the two people watched the deer amble across the field, nimbly hop the fence, and continue on, just as deer always do when you see them in the fields in the evening. We can assign any romantic meaning to this encounter, or take it for what it was... two watching two.

| Posted on 2016-07-12 | by a guest


.: :.

It can also represent that man and nature can perfectly get along with each other if they are not separated by a barrier which in this case is the wall with barb wire created by men.

| Posted on 2016-02-03 | by a guest


.: :.

Love and forgetting might have carried them
A little further up the mountain side
With night so near, but not much further up.
They must have halted soon in any case
With thoughts of a path back, how rough it was
With rock and washout, and unsafe in darkness;
When they were halted by a tumbled wall
With barbed-wire binding. They stood facing this,
Spending what onward impulse they still had
In One last look the way they must not go,
On up the failing path, where, if a stone
Or earthslide moved at night, it moved itself;
No footstep moved it. \'This is all,\' they sighed,
Good-night to woods.\' But not so; there was more.
A doe from round a spruce stood looking at them
Across the wall, as near the wall as they.
She saw them in their field, they her in hers.
The difficulty of seeing what stood still,
Like some up-ended boulder split in two,
Was in her clouded eyes; they saw no fear there.
She seemed to think that two thus they were safe.
Then, as if they were something that, though strange,
She could not trouble her mind with too long,
She sighed and passed unscared along the wall.
\'This, then, is all. What more is there to ask?\'
But no, not yet. A snort to bid them wait.
A buck from round the spruce stood looking at them
Across the wall as near the wall as they.
This was an antlered buck of lusty nostril,
Not the same doe come back into her place.
He viewed them quizzically with jerks of head,
As if to ask, \'Why don\'t you make some motion?
Or give some sign of life? Because you can\'t.
I doubt if you\'re as living as you look.\"
Thus till he had them almost feeling dared
To stretch a proffering hand -- and a spell-breaking.
Then he too passed unscared along the wall.
Two had seen two, whichever side you spoke from.
\'This must be all.\' It was all. Still they stood,
A great wave from it going over them,
As if the earth in one unlooked-for favour
Had made them certain earth returned their love.

| Posted on 2013-03-10 | by a guest


.: :.

\"Two Look At Two\" seems to be a poem about two people who were once in love, and are still together, but nearing the end of their relationship, or perhaps life. The deer may represent what these two could have become, had their love flourished, as the two deer could jump the tumbled wall and barbed wire, and taken their love to a higher level.

| Posted on 2013-03-02 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this is a poem about the lack of love in their hearts. Nature keeps love, that\'s why the doe and the buck are like god and goddess of the mountain on the other side of the wall.The great wave at the end is just a sigh of memories when feelings were strong.So nature reminds them what love is and now they can understand it without the passion of feelings.\"Love and forgetting...\"
They will never go futher, they will never cross the wall.

| Posted on 2013-02-16 | by a guest


.: :.

The fence represents death. The road behind represents the life past. The mountain above represents the future. The deer couple represent the next generation. The old couple can rest at ease knowing that the future generation has acknowledged their effort and that they will be carrying on up the mountain continuing to love as they had throughout their nearly completed lives.

| Posted on 2012-11-13 | by a guest


.: :.

Personally I think Frost hints at the limitation of the power of love. Despite the poem displaying love to be, superificially, powerful there is a sense of love having limits. The opening and closing line of the poem is \"love\", suggesting love acting as an enduring and constant force, and yet is constantly referred to whilst coupled with the conditional tense, \"love and forgetting MIGHT have\" \"AS IF earth in one unlooked for favour/had made them certain and returned their love.\" The use of a conditional tense almost seems to imply that love is not an all powerful and enduring force it would appear and is subject to the same faults as the lovers.
Even after this rather magical experiance of seeing a doe the couple are described as \"still (they stood),\" the stasis of the physical characters almost seems to reflect the notion that despite this rather enlightening experiance the couple\'s love has not increased, or, indeed, progressed.
I wrote something like this in my mock exam, comparing it the absence and stoicial nature of love in \"out,out--\" and failed :(.

| Posted on 2011-05-19 | by a guest


.: :.

Themes:
• Love: The tricky journey up the hillside is a parallel to the difficulties of a loving relationship.
• The bond of man with nature: The deer seem able to overcome the obstacle in their relationship and on seeing this the man and woman have an epiphany over their own relationship. “As if the earth in one unlooked-for favour had made them certain earth returned their love.”
• The hardships of life: Maybe nature (the steep mountain) and certainly humans (the barbed-wire and tumbled wall) make life more difficult.
Imagery:
• “Love and forgetting might have carried them A little further up the mountainside.” Love is what they used to have, they need to forget what they have now ( a sterile relationship) in order to progress their relationship.
• “When they were halted by a tumbled wall With barbed-wire binding”  They come to an obstacle to their relationship. The tumbled wall may represent a breaking of a boundary which is needed for a healthy relationship, or may represent that the bulk of their love has been destroyed, with only the core of it- the barbed wire- remaining. This wire cannot be broken, but nor can the wall be crossed, hence they are “Stood still” and cannot advance nor regress the relationship.
• “Like some up-ended boulder split in two”  Again reiterating their broken relationship.
• “in her clouded eyes: they saw no fear there”  The doe is in a much more open relationship, perhaps without boundaries as in the man and woman’s. Perhaps she represents the more sexually liberated younger generation who can advance their relationships further than the old, due to their lack of inhibitions.
• “an antlered buck of lusty nostril…viewed them quizzically…as if to ask ‘Why don’t you make some motion?’”  Again the sexually liberated younger generation is wondering why the men and women do not further their relationship, hence ‘Why don’t you make some motion?’ The lusty nostril is indicative of the vivacious passion lacking in the human couple.
• “he had them almost feeling dared To stretch a proffering hand – and a spell-breaking.”  On seeing the young pair of deer the couple have an epiphany that they themselves can be the boulder to fix the broken wall. They have the power to mend and further their relationship.
• “Two had seen two … a great wave from it going over them, As if the earth in one unlooked-for favour Had made them certain earth returned their love,”  They’ve had their epiphany and they have the earth to thank for this, since through nature their course of action was made clear.
Meaning:
• The couple in this poem reach the tumbled wall and cannot overcome this obstacle to their relationship, whilst the young buck and doe can. This may be an allusion to the sexual liberation of the younger generation, which has allowed them to further their relationship, whereas the more puritanical older generation feel sexually inhibited – the obstacle to their love. Having seen the young love and openness of the deer the couple realise that they have the power to overcome their inhibitions and obstacles – they are potentially the boulder to repair the wall.
Josh B

| Posted on 2011-05-01 | by a guest


.: :.

An elderly couple is walking up a mountain, which is life. The path they have taken was long and hard. They are thinking of \"a path back.\" Then they are stopped by a wall. This wall is an obstacle they cannot surpass. The wall prevents them from going onto the rougher path up higher. They see both a doe and a buck go along the \"failing path.\" This symbolizes the younger, more determined generation. Then they sigh and think deep thoughts about earth. Then they are sure that \"earth returned their love.\"

| Posted on 2011-03-20 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe that a spelling error has remained uncorrecting in the line \'She seemed to think that too thus they were safe\". The word \'two\' makes no sense at all in that sentence. My analysis of the whole poem is that it is an inhibition of a sexual nature which has caused the human couple to be not \'as living as\' they look, and the \'proffering hand\' might contain a sense of ambiguity; insofar as they also needed to reach out towards each other, physically. I think the \'snort to bid them wait\' of the \'lusty nostril\' of the buck, may be interpreted to support this reading of the poem. A romance that failed (or almost failed?) as a result of the general puritanical times in which Robert Frost lived.

| Posted on 2011-01-08 | by a guest


.: :.

In both title ad the opening of the poem there is a sense of symmetery that suggest both power and love and the harmonious relationship between man and nature.
The enjambment and the simple accessible language is easily related to Frost's colloquial tone. Initailly the natural world seems to provide a sense of danger and fear but the poem also take us beyond the boundaries and limitations as the couple forget about the daily grind of life and lose themselves on the mountainside. Yet, the rest of the poem constantly surprises the couple with it's possibilities. The alliteration "...with bobbed wire binding. They stood facing this..." emphasises the appearence of an obstacle and paints the couple in a pale and vunerable light.

| Posted on 2009-12-08 | by a guest


.: :.

its almost as if the couple have been walking all day and not seen anything then they are about to give up on life and turn back, which they both wanted to do, "with thoughts of the path back" then suddenly they are given new energy when they see the doe appear from no where, but they cant get close to it because of the wall. The wall therefor represents a segregation between the tired worn out old man kind and the bountiful nature.

| Posted on 2009-12-01 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that the wall stands for a strong obstacle that may need help overcoming and although it's not meant to be conquered, there is something to say for trying. The deer stands for the guidance provided by nature and the presence of a higher being.

| Posted on 2009-06-17 | by a guest


.: :.

I think the deer represents lord jesus christ in his quest to save humanity from the evils of the antichrist which is the mountain.

| Posted on 2008-12-03 | by a guest


.: :.

the deer show that a carneval has once taken place here but now nature has overridden it. the humans have come to enjoy the carneval but the deer are telling them that life is not all fun and games and their love should guide them down the mountain. the old fence is reminance of the carneval that has broken down over the years into a harmless fence, unable to hurt the deer and no longer able to corrupt the souls of humans.

| Posted on 2008-03-20 | by a guest


.: frost :.

the deerare more human-like the hikers. The mountain represents the challenes of life and the stagnant hikers have come to a halt. The deer on the other hand have been able to carry on, they are a gift from nature to show the hikers the way.

| Posted on 2008-03-20 | by a guest


.: :.

i think that this poem is just another one of frost's continual nature poems. he uses nature to try to describe relationships that need to be worked out and fixed. "with thoughts of a path back" frost is somewhat refering to his poem "the road not taken" in which he decides to take the path that almost no one has traveled and find out the opportunity that is ahead of him. this "path back" was the wrong path to take becasue it was rough and did not go that well.

| Posted on 2007-04-30 | by a guest




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