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Hidden Flame Analysis



Author: poem of John Dryden Type: poem Views: 5

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Feed a flame within, which so torments me

That it both pains my heart, and yet contains me:

'Tis such a pleasing smart, and I so love it,

That I had rather die than once remove it.

  

Yet he, for whom I grieve, shall never know it;

My tongue does not betray, nor my eyes show it.

Not a sigh, nor a tear, my pain discloses,

But they fall silently, like dew on roses.

  

Thus, to prevent my Love from being cruel,

My heart's the sacrifice, as 'tis the fuel;

And while I suffer this to give him quiet,

My faith rewards my love, though he deny it.

  

On his eyes will I gaze, and there delight me;

While I conceal my love no frown can fright me.

To be more happy I dare not aspire,

Nor can I fall more low, mounting no higher.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

In \"Hidden Flame,\" Dryden writes from a female perspective, keeping reason above emotion throughout the poem. The woman refuses to reveal her true feelings to the man she loves. Dryden uses an interesting sentence in the second stanza: \"Yet he, for whom I grieve, shall never know it\" (3). Choosing to write the word \"grieve,\" a word usually used to describe sorrow or sadness about a death, gives the reader further insight into the woman\'s emotional being. She is clearly upset that she can not tell the man how she feels, but is content in the knowledge that her love will go unrequited.

| Posted on 2011-08-25 | by a guest


.: :.

In \"Hidden Flame,\" Dryden writes from a female perspective, keeping reason above emotion throughout the poem. The woman refuses to reveal her true feelings to the man she loves. Dryden uses an interesting sentence in the second stanza: \"Yet he, for whom I grieve, shall never know it\" (3). Choosing to write the word \"grieve,\" a word usually used to describe sorrow or sadness about a death, gives the reader further insight into the woman\'s emotional being. She is clearly upset that she can not tell the man how she feels, but is content in the knowledge that her love will go unrequited.

| Posted on 2011-08-25 | by a guest




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