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Sonnet : On the Sonnet Analysis



Author: Poetry of John Keats Type: Poetry Views: 1010

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If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd,

And, like Andromeda, the Sonnet sweet

Fetter'd, in spite of pained loveliness,

Let us find, if we must be constrain'd,

Sandals more interwoven and complete

To fit the naked foot of Poesy:

Let us inspect the Lyre, and weigh the stress

Of every chord, and see what may be gain'd

By ear industrious, and attention meet;

Misers of sound and syllable, no less

Than Midas of his coinage, let us be

Jealous of dead leaves in the bay wreath crown;

So, if we may not let the Muse be free,

She will be bound with garlands of her own.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

I believe that firstly, this poem has multiple and perhaps conflicting interpretations that justly reflects on Keats attitude toward the subject. One large debate is that Keats is ambivalent towards sonnets, which is indeed quite understandable. It seems as if he enjoys sonnets and the success seen in them, but despises the reliance on the sonnet as a medium for effective poetry. Keats most likely is trying to state that poetry must be composed in accordance to itself- the words and the chords, rather than composing a poem in accordance to words and chords of past literature and sonnets

| Posted on 2011-10-02 | by a guest


.: :.

John Keats believes that the sonnet is overly restrictive, fettered in site of how loveley it could be otherwise. Moreover, he implores us to understand that we\'ve paid too much concern on how dull rhymes contribute to the overall flow; he alludes this to\"fit the naked foot of Poesy\". I admire his way of comparing this to how midas pays to much concern for his coinage.Only by unbinding the restrictions in the sonnet, can we use reach the pinnacle of english and use it to our maximum potential. Consequently, \'She will be bound with garlands of her own. \'

| Posted on 2011-03-23 | by a guest


.: :.

How do you know what Keats believes? You can't talk to him. You aren't allowed to say that "He believes" because you don't actually know. Say what you believe.

| Posted on 2010-05-30 | by a guest


.: :.

How do you know what Keats believes? You can't talk to him. You aren't allowed to say that "He believes" because you don't actually know. Say what you believe.

| Posted on 2010-05-30 | by a guest


.: :.

One of the best analogies that Keats makes is the reference to Midas. Comparing those who pay too much attention to the rhyme and meter of a poem is similar to how Midas was overly concerned with his gold coinage. I also believe that the reference to dead leaves is another comment about freedom because they are easily blown wherevery the wind takes them. Finally, he implores the readers to understand that if this codified form of poetry is to continure, it will be chained down and "bound with garlands of its own."

| Posted on 2009-07-21 | by a guest


.: analysis by a student :.

The speaker opens with an allusion to the Greek myth of Andromeda, which was about a beautiful woman who was supposedly chained to a rock and left to be devoured by a sea monster. If poetry continues to follow the unsatisfactory form of the Petrarchan or Shakespearean sonnets, it too will share a similar fate. He then compares a naked foot to the composition of poetry. He suggests that we should make a more fitting shoe, or form of writing to protect or cover the bare poetry. Also, with a more fitting form, it will be more likely to walk a farther distance into success. (?) The speaker goes on to compare the poetry form (?) to a lyre as an instrument capable of producing beauty. The chords are like the words used to produce the poem, and the notes would be the syllables. He recommends that we examine our writing more closely, taking every word into account, and then see the results. We should put much care into perfecting our piece, even trying new things to make it better. Referring to fellow poets as penny-pinchers of words, like King Midas in the Greek myth was of his gold, the speaker warns them of the dying leaves in the bay-wreath crown, a symbol of the dying poetic achievement. Finally, he refers to the Muse--the goddess of art--as poetic inspiration; once it is bound by these dying leaves or garlands in the crown, a poet cannot make use of his fullest creative potential.

| Posted on 2008-06-06 | by a guest


.: analysis by a student :.

The speaker opens with an allusion to the Greek myth of Andromeda, which was about a beautiful woman who was supposedly chained to a rock and left to be devoured by a sea monster. If poetry continues to follow the unsatisfactory form of the Petrarchan or Shakespearean sonnets, it too will share a similar fate. He then compares a naked foot to the composition of poetry. He suggests that we should make a more fitting shoe, or form of writing to protect or cover the bare poetry. Also, with a more fitting form, it will be more likely to walk a farther distance into success. (?) The speaker goes on to compare the poetry form (?) to a lyre as an instrument capable of producing beauty. The chords are like the words used to produce the poem, and the notes would be the syllables. He recommends that we examine our writing more closely, taking every word into account, and then see the results. We should put much care into perfecting our piece, even trying new things to make it better. Referring to fellow poets as penny-pinchers of words, like King Midas in the Greek myth was of his gold, the speaker warns them of the dying leaves in the bay-wreath crown, a symbol of the dying poetic achievement. Finally, he refers to the Muse--the goddess of art--as poetic inspiration; once it is bound by these dying leaves or garlands in the crown, a poet cannot make use of his fullest creative potential.

| Posted on 2008-06-06 | by a guest


.: :.

I think Keats is saying that the rules for the sonnet are too restrictive, and not that the restrictions are necessary but that really good poems are can be worked around the rules to make some beautiful literature. Case in point, this poem.

| Posted on 2008-04-27 | by a guest


.: :.

Keats believes the sonnet is overly restrictive and states that it chains our English and constrains us from writing creatively. Additionally, he compares the sonnet to an excessively interwoven sandal that steals the freedom felt by the wearer of traditional, more open sandals.
Hey, someone out there is posting comments as me. It it you guys (Nathan and Kevin)?
This really is Taylor. Ask me something so you know its me.
Love

| Posted on 2008-04-07 | by a guest


.: Admin :.

You kids need to stop posting garbage. This site is for real analysis only. Any further malpheasance, and you will be reported to the Administration.

| Posted on 2008-04-07 | by a guest


.: :.

Keats believes the sonnet is overly restrictive and states that it chains our English and constrains us from writing creatively. Additionally, he compares the sonnet to an excessively interwoven sandal that steals the freedom felt by the wearer of traditional, more open sandals.
r u still there
Love ;# Taylor

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Keats believes the sonnet is overly restrictive and states that it chains our English and constrains us from writing creatively. Additionally, he compares the sonnet to an excessively interwoven sandal that steals the freedom felt by the wearer of traditional, more open sandals.
Jesus Saves

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

.: :.
Keats believes the sonnet is overly restrictive and states that it chains our English and constrains us from writing creatively. Additionally, he compares the sonnet to an excessively interwoven sandal that steals the freedom felt by the wearer of traditional, more open sandals.
Jusus saves

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

.: :.
Keats believes the sonnet is overly restrictive and states that it chains our English and constrains us from writing creatively. Additionally, he compares the sonnet to an excessively interwoven sandal that steals the freedom felt by the wearer of traditional, more open sandals.
Hey Nathan. Are u guys reading Keats too. We just started. I could tell it was you.
Love :3 Taylor

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Keats believes the sonnet is overly restrictive and states that it chains our English and constrains us from writing creatively. Additionally, he compares the sonnet to an excessively interwoven sandal that steals the freedom felt by the wearer of traditional, more open sandals.
Where is St. Davids
1420 ATHENS DRIVE. RALEIGH, NC 27606

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Keats believes the sonnet is overly restrictive and states that it chains our English and constrains us from writing creatively. Additionally, he compares the sonnet to an excessively interwoven sandal that steals the freedom felt by the wearer of traditional, more open sandals.
no, we go to another school. where is athens drive?

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Keats believes the sonnet is overly restrictive and states that it chains our English and constrains us from writing creatively. Additionally, he compares the sonnet to an excessively interwoven sandal that steals the freedom felt by the wearer of traditional, more open sandals.
I created myself

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Keats believes the sonnet is overly restrictive and states that it chains our English and constrains us from writing creatively. Additionally, he compares the sonnet to an excessively interwoven sandal that steals the freedom felt by the wearer of traditional, more open sandals.
I don't have a father, i grew out of the ground.

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Actually, Keats here is saying that meter and scheme used to compose a sonnet, though restrictive, is necessary for beautiful poetry. He compares it to an interwoven sandal that fits the wearer better simply because it is more restricting. At the end, the reference to the Muse being bound with garlands has a positive connotation, not a negative one. Keats implies that because the Muse is bound, what comes from her is more complete and polished.
do you guys go to athens drive too! I have an english project

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Actually, Keats here is saying that meter and scheme used to compose a sonnet, though restrictive, is necessary for beautiful poetry. He compares it to an interwoven sandal that fits the wearer better simply because it is more restricting. At the end, the reference to the Muse being bound with garlands has a positive connotation, not a negative one. Keats implies that because the Muse is bound, what comes from her is more complete and polished.
Luke i am your father

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe that this guest has accuratetly examined this poem by Keats. It is apparent that he is going through a battle within himself and needs to overcome his inner struggle. It is also clear that Keats throughout his life was a fan of the oboe and despised asians. These facts are clearly reflected in this piece.
Who are you?

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Actually, Keats here is saying that meter and scheme used to compose a sonnet, though restrictive, is necessary for beautiful poetry. He compares it to an interwoven sandal that fits the wearer better simply because it is more restricting. At the end, the reference to the Muse being bound with garlands has a positive connotation, not a negative one. Keats implies that because the Muse is bound, what comes from her is more complete and polished. hi

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

IT WAS A BOMB. work with me here. I am a lawyer reporting, we are not sure, but we think it was a bomb.

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Here's the thing, burn is a word that should be allowed to be posted. I, a member of the aryan race, am allowed to use the word while members of the asian community are banned from it. Amen

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Kevin Park is an obscene little man who abuses this search engine. To take him into custody his address is 13320 Little Rock, TX 34425.

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: Response :.

It is pretty clear that as well as condemming the sonnet for its blasphemous hatred toward the english language it is also supporting Hilary Clinton, social security, and the war on terrorism!

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Throughout the time i am writing this, i am being attacked by african tribesmen who are trying to cut off my face and eat my dignity. It feels like my heart has been dropped in a bucket of boiling tears and my soul is being beaten with a frozen sledgehammer.

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

This piece is absolutely stunning. Keats is a genius and this is obvious throughout the work. I would like to give a shout out to Owen at this time as well for reading this. Everyone loves you. Back to the poem, Keats is awesome and I really hope that tom gets to read this poem and understand its true connotations

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: Response :.

This user is incorrect. Keats is actually passing military secrets encoded in his sonnets. If you decrypt it using Codebreaker II, oyu can find a 3 word message. Use the cypher 23,45,2 5,56,76,67 4,56,54,3 ,2,3,4,5
It's just like in national treasure

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe that this guest has accuratetly examined this poem by Keats. It is apparent that he is going through a battle within himself and needs to overcome his inner struggle. It is also clear that Keats throughout his life was a fan of the oboe and despised asians. These facts are clearly reflected in this piece.

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: Analysis :.

In this poem, Keats is fighting hiself on the inside. He is not sure of whether his life is skrewed up or not. Inside he is trying to release his soul into the oblivion of Keleigh the god of the Force. Whether he succeeds or not depends on the reader.

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: Analysis :.

In this poem, Keats is fighting hiself on the inside. He is not sure of whether his life is skrewed up or not. Inside he is trying to release his soul into the oblivion of Keleigh the god of the Force. Whether he succeeds or not depends on the reader.

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is a really great poem. keats is analyzing the sonnet in a way that few poets can. Hey Kevin. he claims that the restrictions there are necessary to the poem and help the overall flow of the piece

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Actually, Keats here is saying that meter and scheme used to compose a sonnet, though restrictive, is necessary for beautiful poetry. He compares it to an interwoven sandal that fits the wearer better simply because it is more restricting. At the end, the reference to the Muse being bound with garlands has a positive connotation, not a negative one. Keats implies that because the Muse is bound, what comes from her is more complete and polished.

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: Analysis :.

Keats believes the sonnet is overly restrictive and states that it chains our English and constrains us from writing creatively. Additionally, he compares the sonnet to an excessively interwoven sandal that steals the freedom felt by the wearer of traditional, more open sandals.

| Posted on 2007-04-16 | by a guest




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