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Do not go gentle into that good night Analysis



Author: Poetry of Unknown Author Type: Poetry Views: 3666





Do not go gentle into that good night,

Old age should burn and rave at close of day;

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.



Though wise men at their end know dark is right,

Because their words had forked no lightning they

Do not go gentle into that good night.



Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright

Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.



Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,

And learn, too late, they grieve it on its way,

Do not go gentle into that good night.



Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight

Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.



And you, my father, there on the sad height,

Curse, less, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

He wrote this about his dying father, per my English teacher in High School 1974.

| Posted on 2010-10-10 | by a guest


.: :.

-Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
-Because their words had forked no lightning they
-Do not go gentle into that good night.
The strong will continue the struggle because they are seeking, and have not yet found, a universal truth; and in the seeking they have found purpose. Though the effort should consume them all their days, it is no less a valuable or a worthy endeavor, so long as the promise of "what could be" - still can be.

| Posted on 2010-04-03 | by a guest


.: :.

A first glance at Thomas’s most famous poem, Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night, It appears that the poem is merely about the helplessness of growing old and dying, but looking at it more closely it is about living a strong life and refusing to go down without a fight. Thomas is appealing to a large audience, calling, “wise men…good men…wild men…grave men,” encouraging them to face the world. The diction utilized by Thomas revels that his focus is on life rather than death, using words like “green,” “blaze,” and “fierce.” Thomas is so caught up in the ideal of living that he even personifies “their frail deeds,” which “danced in a green bay.” The first five stanzas each contain three verses, but the sixth and final stanza, in which the persona becomes personal and addresses his father, contains four verses, showing that Thomas is primarily interested in the last stanza of the poem. This makes is easy to see that the persona is Thomas himself, pleading to a sick father.

| Posted on 2010-04-01 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem consists of 6 stanzas. Each of the stanzas 1 to 5 has 3 verses, but the sixth one has 4 verses as the ending stanza.
Each stanza has an embracing rhyme (a b a), the end of the first verse rhymes with the end of the second verse.
E.g.: …night …day …light (first stanza)
A noticeable thing is that the last words of the first and third verse of all stanzas rhyme themselves. Also all the last words of the second verses rhyme, but they do not with the words of the first and third verses.
This structure continues over the whole poem, except the last stanza, which is rhymed in the rhythm a b a a.
The introductory stanza says that old age should do something against the other things and should not give up and do nothing. In stanza 2 to 5 the author lists a few groups of people: wise men, good men, wild men and grave men and describes their actions with a few metaphors, which I am going to mention later again. In the last stanza Dylan Thomas speaks to his father.

| Posted on 2010-03-14 | by a guest


.: :.

this do not go gentle into that good night is mad good poem i'm a fan of DYLAN THOMAS yo he rock.

| Posted on 2010-02-19 | by a guest


.: :.

this ooem is addressed to his gying father urging him to not give in to death,on the cotrary to fight and resist death.then he gives examples wise man,wild ,good gust to boost up his father,s moral.Wild,good gust to bosst his father moral up....Ali

| Posted on 2010-01-25 | by a guest


.: :.

I would also like to point out how in the poem and title, Thomas say do not go gentle into that good night. The correct word choice should be gently. Thomas creates a verb out or an adjective to emphasize the fight for life.

| Posted on 2009-05-10 | by a guest


.: :.

My beleifs are that Dylan Thomas had alot of meaning behind the light and dark seqeunces during his poem. The poem shows alot of imagery towards him dying and yet asking him to " do not go gentle into that good night " as if hes trying to tell his father not to go out without fighitng his death off prolonging it.

| Posted on 2009-04-07 | by a guest


.: :.

.: Life, Not Death :.
Do Not Go Gentle . . . , a villanelle by Dylan Thomas, addresses the occasion of his father's death. He seems to fear, loath, and swear against a willing passage into the "dying of the light"-- or, life-- and urges his father to "rage, rage" against it; that is, he urges him to fight death, to not succomb to it easily, but to pursue life. The repetition of the first and third lines of the first stanza, as typical to the villanelle form, serves a dual purpose. The first is to draw the reader into the poem, it's importance to humanity, and it's centralized theme of living (not truly death, as some may suppose). The second is to serve as a continual urging; the emphasis of these lines, this consistancy, is as the repetetive urge at a football game, "You can do it! Come on! Come on!" The poem begins with a universal address, and slowly, through its repetetive progression, becomes more introspective, more relative, to that situation involving Dylan and his father.

| Posted on 2009-04-07 | by a guest


.: :.

i am doing a comparison of this poem and morrie schwartz a professor that had ALS ted koppel interviewed him on nightline and morrie thinks that you should live your life to the fullest and that dont be afraid of death which is what this poem symbolizes

| Posted on 2009-03-30 | by a guest


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This poem is about a dying gloriously but also avoiding death.

| Posted on 2009-02-18 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is about the loving and generousness of a sson

| Posted on 2009-02-16 | by a guest


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This poem was written by Dylan Thomas. He is an awesome writer. I think that this poem was about how he is mad that some people are so mellow about death.

| Posted on 2008-12-11 | by a guest


.: :.

Wise, good, wild and grave men (of all personalities and every persuasion) do not surrender to Death easily
While Death is "good" and irresistible, the final spark of life in every man, must blaze both defiantly and furiously against the force that extinguishes it.
The poem is an exhortation to die gloriously, resisting the inexorable advance of the inevitable

| Posted on 2008-10-23 | by a guest


.: Do Not Go Gentle :.

The retrospective of this poetic sequence is commonly refferred to as a darker poem focused more on death rather than life. It actually suggests that he should live his life to the fullest. It presents the fact that his father has died and that he should be different than his father and make his own life exciting.

| Posted on 2008-01-15 | by a guest


.: Do not go gentle... :.

My beleifs are that Dylan Thomas had alot of meaning behind the light and dark seqeunces during his poem. The poem shows alot of imagery towards him dying and yet asking him to " do not go gentle into that good night " as if hes trying to tell his father not to go out without fighitng his death off prolonging it.

| Posted on 2007-12-12 | by a guest


.: Do not go gentle... :.

My beleifs are that Dylan Thomas had alot of meaning behind the light and dark seqeunces during his poem. The poem shows alot of imagery towards him dying and yet asking him to " do not go gentle into that good night " as if hes trying to tell his father not to go out without fighitng his death off, prolonging it.

| Posted on 2007-12-11 | by a guest


.: :.

in the poem "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night
", Dylan Thomas is telling his father to "rage , rage against the dying of the light". here, light means life, and night means death. the euphemistic way of likening the night to death is a tool whereby dylan thomas is trying to say that like the night, we are tempted to just close our eyes, therefore it is "gentle
". howevever, "good men", "wild men" and
"grave men" are strong, they do not succumb. because however tempting the night is, our life is still strong and we still have lots of things to do.

| Posted on 2007-11-02 | by a guest


.: "Do Not Go Gentle . . ." :.

To a large degree, one finds the poetic voice -- now confronted with the imminent death of its father -- actually petitioning itself not to "go gentle into that good night." In other words, even as it petitions the father to "rage against the dying of the light," it is praying that it will, as well, be able to confront death somewhat heroically. Essentially, the poetic voice is finally trying to convince itself that its possible to not "go gentle" into death. If the poetic voice can get the father to do it, then, perhaps, it is, indeed possible.

| Posted on 2005-01-14 | by Approved Guest


.: Life, Not Death :.

Do Not Go Gentle . . . , a villanelle by Dylan Thomas, addresses the occasion of his father's death. He seems to fear, loath, and swear against a willing passage into the "dying of the light"-- or, life-- and urges his father to "rage, rage" against it; that is, he urges him to fight death, to not succomb to it easily, but to pursue life. The repetition of the first and third lines of the first stanza, as typical to the villanelle form, serves a dual purpose. The first is to draw the reader into the poem, it's importance to humanity, and it's centralized theme of living (not truly death, as some may suppose). The second is to serve as a continual urging; the emphasis of these lines, this consistancy, is as the repetetive urge at a football game, "You can do it! Come on! Come on!" The poem begins with a universal address, and slowly, through its repetetive progression, becomes more introspective, more relative, to that situation involving Dylan and his father.

| Posted on 2004-09-26 | by Approved Guest




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