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What Should I Say Analysis



Author: Poetry of Sir Thomas Wyatt Type: Poetry Views: 350

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What should I say,

Since faith is dead,

And truth away

From you is fled?

Should I be led

With doubleness?

Nay, nay, mistress!



I promised you,

And you promised me,

To be as true

As I would be.

But since I see

Your double heart,

Farewell my part!



Though for to take

It is not my mind,

But to forsake

[One so unkind]

And as I find,

So will I trust:

Farewell, unjust!



Can ye say nay?

But you said

That I alway

Should be obeyed?

And thus betrayed

Or that I wiste--

Farewell, unkissed.








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What should I Say By Sir Thomas Wyatt What should I say, Since faith is dead, And truth away From you is fled? Should I be led With doubleness? Nay, nay, mistress! I promised you, And you promised me, To be as true As I would be. But since I see Your double heart, Farewell my part! Though for to take It is not my mind, But to forsake [One so unkind] And as I find, So will I trust: Farewell, unjust! Can ye say nay? But you said That I alway Should be obeyed? And thus betrayed Or that I wiste— Farewell, unkissed. "What Should I Say," by Sir Thomas Wyatt, is a farewell between a man and his mistress. Wyatt's piece opens with questions and doubts ( i.e. faith & honesty.)The second stanza is dedicated to a promise proposed between the man and his mistress; "I promised you, And you promised me, To be as true As I would be." For some reason this woman betrayed their covenant and the "double heart" that she now has is pushing him away. Stanza three is the man speaking on how he never meant to just take from this woman and leave her high and dry. However, he is willing to forsake her for her own unjust actions. Wyatt concludes this piece with a question form the man to his former mistress. Can she deny his accusations? His obedience lead to her betrayal, and he bids her farewell. In the manor of this piece it doesn't seem that the title "mistress" is by book definition. By reading and trying to comprehend Wyatt's work, it seems it is rather a cut to his lover on his part because he knows she is a backstabber where the audience does not. I can sympatize with the male character in a way of betrayal. The line that ties this piece together is the last line, "Farewell, unkissed." He left her as helpless as he feels. Most departures between lovers end in a kiss, but this line is symbolic to the present. The present can be said to mean the end of a bad relationship.

| Posted on 2016-11-22 | by a guest




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