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To Nature Analysis



Author: Poetry of Samuel Taylor Coleridge Type: Poetry Views: 1261

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It may indeed be phantasy, when I

Essay to draw from all created things

Deep, heartfelt, inward joy that closely clings ;

And trace in leaves and flowers that round me lie

Lessons of love and earnest piety.

So let it be ; and if the wide world rings

In mock of this belief, it brings

Nor fear, nor grief, nor vain perplexity.

So will I build my altar in the fields,

And the blue sky my fretted dome shall be,

And the sweet fragrance that the wild flower yields

Shall be the incense I will yield to Thee,

Thee only God ! and thou shalt not despise

Even me, the priest of this poor sacrifice.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

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To Nature, a beautiful and meanful poem written by an English poet,literary critic and philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) says the difference or the similarity between nature and human.
The word created things denotes in the second line of the poem means all creature and plats in the universe.
The poet is having deep, heartfelt and inward joy. This expression shows the intense and personal experience of the poet.
In the poem, the poet says it may indeed be phantasy. But I think, The experience of the poet was not only a phantasy because the poet experiences the presence of god in the nature.
The third and fourth line says the poet is tracing for love and earnest piety in the nature around him. If we can find beauty in everything we will gifted with joy.
The expression let it be suggests the belief of poet.
The eighth line denotes that some people may ridicule the poet's ideas, but he is not worried of afraid. The poet is thinking that the nature is his place for worship. The field is altar, the sky is the dome, the wild flowers make the incenses. The poet is saying the sacrifice is poor because he is not the real priest.
Here the poet is the priest of the nature. A poet will find the beauty in everything. This is the common between the poet and the priest.

By
Krishna Nanda

| Posted on 2013-12-07 | by a guest


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This poem is about how the poet treats the nature as an offering for God and tries to find God in nature.
Lami. Mc

| Posted on 2012-11-19 | by a guest


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This is about how coleridge wanted to live in america with his friend balsak. they envisioned life on the river and being one with nature

| Posted on 2012-11-08 | by a guest


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The poem is late, from a manuscript dated circa 1820 (according to the Everyman edition). \"Phantasy\" is a humbler alternative to the Imagination that is vaunted in the \"famous distinction\", an admission that he has less control of his vision than he thought. The piety is formal; he still hopes to draw \"joy\" from Nature but the tone is wistful, recognising that this won\'t really be enough.
Technically it is a sonnet of generally Shakespearean form (three quatrains + couplet, abbacddcefefgg) - competent work (beyond the dreams of most!) but lacking an arresting phrase or image.

| Posted on 2012-10-06 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem is late, from a manuscript dated circa 1820 (according to the Everyman edition). \"Phantasy\" is a humbler alternative to the Imagination that is vaunted in the \"famous distinction\", an admission that he has less control of his vision than he thought. The piety is formal; he still hopes to draw joy from Nature but the tone is wistful, recognising that this might not really be enough.
Technically it is a sonnet of generally Shakespearean form (three quatrains + couplet, abbacddcefefgg) - competent work (beyond the dreams of most!) but lacking an arresting phrase or image.

| Posted on 2012-10-06 | by a guest


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this was written during the Romantic era, so basically taylor\'s pushing aside all rationale that was prevalent during the republican era and surrendering to his feelingsne

| Posted on 2011-09-29 | by a guest


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excuse me, i need analysis of the hole poem per line!someone can help me plese i need it now!

| Posted on 2011-05-31 | by a guest


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Actually, if you all look closely, this page has an interesting reference to a certain site and a certain set of internet rules... just look at the internet address... it\'s there

| Posted on 2011-05-03 | by a guest


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sam is one of the best poets ever to walk the face of the earth, yet his poems are retarded

| Posted on 2011-04-19 | by a guest


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This poem reflects Coleridge's Pantheism - that is, that he believed God and the Universe to be one thing. This is especially evident in lines 9-10 "So I will build my alter in the fields..." He recognises that it may indeed be "phantasy" or impractical to draw all of one's knowledge from nature "...lessons of love and earnest piety" (5), but he says "let it be" that way - he doesn't care if people ridicule him for this belief. Ultimately this poem reflects the Romantic's concern with nature, that it is a wellspring of knowledge and all lessons can be learnt from it. Coleridge exalts nature in this poem by expressing his Pantheistic view of it being God.

| Posted on 2009-06-07 | by a guest


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i think that i disagree. this might be the poet's fantasy world...his dreams written out.

| Posted on 2009-01-08 | by a guest


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Nature is God, all created things are to be love and respect because is the house of God, if you want to be in peace with nature, you have to be one with nature and you, and only you can restored it and destroyed it, it is you the human and God.

respect everything around you and you wiil find the most valuable thing is this world and that is respect, no one is better than the other, is not equeal either, is Respect.

so in my opinion samuel is the man, he was in a higher level than anybody else in this world.

| Posted on 2006-02-21 | by Approved Guest




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