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Bridal Ballad Analysis



Author: Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe Type: Poetry Views: 1319

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The ring is on my hand,

And the wreath is on my brow;

Satin and jewels grand

Are all at my command,

And I am happy now.



And my lord he loves me well;

But, when first he breathed his vow,

I felt my bosom swell-

For the words rang as a knell,

And the voice seemed his who fell

In the battle down the dell,

And who is happy now.



But he spoke to re-assure me,

And he kissed my pallid brow,

While a reverie came o'er me,

And to the church-yard bore me,

And I sighed to him before me,

Thinking him dead D'Elormie,

"Oh, I am happy now!"



And thus the words were spoken,

And this the plighted vow,

And, though my faith be broken,

And, though my heart be broken,

Here is a ring, as token

That I am happy now!



Would God I could awaken!

For I dream I know not how!

And my soul is sorely shaken

Lest an evil step be taken,-

Lest the dead who is forsaken

May not be happy now.








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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

By the way, this is NOT the original form of the poem nor the revised (printed) version of the poem. This alone changes the complexion of things somewhat. The originally published poem along with his notes is below, taken from his manuscripts, for the information of these posts should be:
BRIDAL x dot htm
THE ring is on my hand,
And the wreath is on my brow;
Satins and jewels grand
Are all at my command,
And I am happy now.
And my lord he loves me well;
But, when first he breathed his vow,
I felt my bosom swell —
For the words rang as a knell,
And the voice seemed his who fell
In the battle down the dell,
And who is happy now.
But he spoke to re-assure me,
And he kissed my pallid brow,
While a reverie came o\'re me,
And to the church-yard bore me,
And I sighed to him before me,
(Thinking him dead D\'Elormie,)
\"Oh, I am happy now!\"
And thus the words were spoken;
And this the plighted vow;
And, though my faith be broken,
And, though my heart be broken,
Here is a ring, as token
That I am happy now! — [page 8:]
Behold the golden token
That proves me happy now!
Would God I could awaken!
For I dream I know not how,
And my soul is sorely shaken
Lest an evil step be taken, —
Lest the dead who is forsaken
May not be happy now.
Poe often used punctuBRIDAL BALLAD.
~
THE ring is on my hand,
And the wreath is on my brow;
Satins and jewels grand
Are all at my command,
And I am happy now.
And my lord he loves me well;
But, when first he breathed his vow,
I felt my bosom swell —
For the words rang as a knell,
And the voice seemed his who fell
In the battle down the dell,
And who is happy now.
But he spoke to re-assure me,
And he kissed my pallid brow,
While a reverie came o\'re me,
And to the church-yard bore me,
And I sighed to him before me,
(Thinking him dead D\'Elormie,)
\"Oh, I am happy now!\"
And thus the words were spoken;
And this the plighted vow;
And, though my faith be broken,
And, though my heart be broken,
Here is a ring, as token
That I am happy now! — [page 8:]
Behold the golden token
That proves me happy now!
Would God I could awaken!
For I dream I know not how,
And my soul is sorely shaken
Lest an evil step be taken, —
Lest the dead who is forsaken
May not be happy now.
Poe often used punctuation to give pauses and emphasis to his work, not trusting the reader to understand what he may or may not have implied without them.

| Posted on 2013-06-03 | by a guest


.: :.

In addition, 4/10/08, what in the world do you mean, since this statement makes NO SENSE whatsoever \"!”(ll.26-27). She wishes with every fibre in her being that she could match the holy power and reverse the dead that she has done.\"? What \"dead that she has done\" are you talking about? She had \"deaded\" no one...duh.

| Posted on 2013-06-03 | by a guest


.: :.

What REALLY bothers me tremendously is the presumption of the 4/10/08 poster to judge another era by this one. First, marriage was RARELY for love and for almost 6 thousand years few could afford the \'romantic\' ideal of love. Rather love might come afterward should the parties involved believe in the commitments marriage requires. This woman had someone named D\'Elormie in her life as her future husband. Chances are greater than lesser it was unrequited, i.e. never born to fruition in actual marriage, but probably an engagement to be married. She was betrothed to him in all likelihood, which was the same bond as marriage without the marriage bed, which came usually after the ceremony itself. During the actually marriage and ceremony that takes place in this poem by that opium using, 12 year old first cousin marrying freak, Poe, she falls into a DAYDREAM (REVERIE)of what it would have been like to marry the dead D\'Elormie of whom she was infatuated. Love comes thru trial and triumph, and BEGINS with infatuation. She obviously didn\'t have time for true love with D\'Elormie as he died in battle. Now she drifts thru her actual marriage to a man that does in fact \"love\" her in the estimation of meaning as Poe was able to give it, dreaming of a love that might have been hers but was lost when D\'Elormie died in battle, presumably as a hero. Else, she would have been glad she didn\'t marry him. She worries of the troth she plighted the departed and the unrequited love that the two bore each other and then begs of herself to awaken lest she fall into the trap of thinking the dead could curse her actual marriage. The last stanza also shows the maniacal belief that the dead could be \"made unhappy\" by the gall of those living and their subsequent life and actions. Which is total rubbish, but as I mentioned, this IS Poe, after all.

| Posted on 2013-06-03 | by a guest


.: :.

BUY BUY BUY Edgar Allen Por new boook it is great and for only $7.00 buy it at your local book store.

| Posted on 2011-04-05 | by a guest


.: :.

write basically this poem is RUBBISH its about some looney person who like to marry people and she is SYCo and i cant believ that comment right at the bottom was so long dont u have anything elese to do jese .

| Posted on 2011-04-05 | by a guest


.: :.

wow this site is very help full thank you the maker of this site

| Posted on 2010-03-10 | by a guest


.: :.

This was very helpful, and really helped me in understanding the Bridal Ballad.

| Posted on 2010-02-11 | by a guest


.: :.

that was really helpful i totally didnt get this poem at all but now i do thanks!

| Posted on 2010-02-08 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe that the analysis from 2008-04-10 and the recent post from 2009-12-07 should be combined. I do think that the post from 2008 has the first part correct but the part that says "the dead who is forsaken/ May not be happy now" is just as 2009 has stated in the fact that the bride is marrying again and does not wish to foresaken her first love who fell "in the battle down the dell."

| Posted on 2010-01-27 | by a guest


.: :.

As far as I'm aware, the narrator is a bride who has married another after the death of her first love. D'Elormie is the love who fell "in the battle down the dell." The narrator is marrying again, but this time to another, and thus is forsaking her first love. She constantly seeks to reassure herself "I am happy now", but inside she is torn, as she know that she is forsaking her fidelity to D'Elormie for another. The last stanza is her wishing to be free, so that her love in the land of the dead is not betrayed.

| Posted on 2009-12-07 | by a guest


.: :.

Wow the comment of 2008-04-10 is really reasonable in a sensible way! Quite helpful for me to understand this poem,I actually thought it was all about pure happiness of a young bride.Thanks!

| Posted on 2009-05-30 | by a guest


.: :.

i think that last comment was very long but kind of helpful.i guess

| Posted on 2009-03-29 | by a guest


.: :.

in my perspective the first stanza seems to emphasise the way she is marrying for wealth and is happy and that her needs are fulfilled and she is "happy now"
"for the words rang as a knell" gives a sense of foreboding and contrasts to the marriage. The last 3 lines in stanza 2 could be about lost love in which she feels guilty and seems to force herself to be happy throughout the poem.

| Posted on 2009-03-18 | by a guest


.: The Price of Security :.

The Price of Security
Marriage is a commitment between two people that is valued favourably. Poe’s “Bridal Ballad” addresses the issues that can arise when marriage is preformed for social reasons, and not for love of another human being. The ‘ everlasting’ tie of holy matrimony should be created with a person that one cares deeply for; economic reasons and social status should not be considered in such a permanent decision, as happiness should be the foremost consideration. The young bride in the ballad investigates the emotions evoked by the entanglement of a forced or arranged marriage.
The “ring…on [her[ hand”(l.1) is a token of the binding ceremony that is taking place. The single gold band is a symbol of possession, the young girl is about to give herself to another human. The “wreath [upon her] brow”(l.2) could be an allusion to Christ on the way to his to be crucified; her soul is about to be crucified within this marriage. The tainted motive behind the union is clearly presented as “ Satin and jewels grand/ Are all at [her] command”(ll.3-4). The unification is obviously done for social and economic reasons, not for the pure ideal of love and companionship. The happiness this creates is fictitious. The young groom does not seem to share his mates uneasiness, “ he loves me well;”(l.6). The groom seems unaware that the nuptials are only for social and economic gain. When he is saying his vows his bride feels fear well up inside her breast. The words he says sound mournful to her ears as a “knell/…voice [seems to fall]”(ll.9-10). Such a happy occasion has become dreary and funeral-like. At this point she questions her happiness. Her apparent hesitation is noticed and an attempt is made to quell the anxiety, “he [speaks] to re-assure [her]/… and [he kisses her] pallid brow”(ll.13-14). The open show of affection does nothing to halt her palpitating heart, and her scampering thoughts. Here at the alter this young bride falls into a fantasy: “Thinking him dead D’Elormie”(l.18). D’Elormie was a architect in Europe, perhaps this is the man whom the young bride truly loves. The suggestion that her bride-groom was dead induced a surge of joy, “Oh, [she is] happy now!”(l.19). Suddenly her illusion is shattered with the final words of her “plighted vow”(l.21). Abruptly trapped within her new marriage this young girl finds her “ faith [to be] broken/ And.. [her] heart [to be] broken”(ll.22-23). The ring becomes a painful reminder that all her dreams are lost, and reality has taken hold of her future. She forces herself to remind her emotions that she “[is] happy now!”(l.25). With a heavy heart and a dejected faith she pleads to God: “ Would God [she] could awaken!/ For [she] dream [she] know not how!”(ll.26-27). She wishes with every fibre in her being that she could match the holy power and reverse the dead that she has done. Her “soul is sorely shaken”(l28) as her dreams are forced into the back of her mind. The love of her life must be forgotten and locked away as he has no hold upon her any longer, at least no appropriate hold. The feelings of desire must be blocked, “Lest an evil step be taken”(l.29). With the final acknowledgement on her part that what could have been never will be her soul lets go: “ the dead who is forsaken/ May not be happy now”(ll.30-31). Stuck with her choice of social status over love, she must learn to force the appearance.
Poe deals with a heavy issue of marriage for love, or for wealth. As

| Posted on 2008-04-10 | by a guest




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