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The Mower Against Gardens Analysis



Author: Poetry of Andrew Marvell Type: Poetry Views: 639

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Luxurious Man, to bring his Vice in use,

Did after him the World seduce:

And from the Fields the Flow'rs and Plants allure,

Where Nature was most plain and pure.

He first enclos'd within the Gardens square

A dead and standing pool of Air:

And a more luscious Earth for them did knead,

Which stupifi'd them while it fed.

The Pink grew then as double as his Mind;

The nutriment did change the kind.

With strange perfumes he did the Roses taint.

And Flow'rs themselves were taught to paint.

The Tulip, white, did for complexion seek;

And learn'd to interline its cheek:

Its Onion root they then so high did hold,

That one was for a Meadow sold.

Another World was search'd, though Oceans new,

To find the Marvel Of Peru.

And yet these Rarities might be allow'd,

To Man, that Sov'raign thing and proud;

Had he not dealt between the Bark and Tree,

Forbidden mixtures there to see.

No Plant now knew the Stock from which it came;

He grafts upon the Wild the Tame:

That the uncertain and adult'rate fruit

Might put the Palate in dispute.

His green Seraglio has its Eunuchs too;

Lest any Tyrant him out-doe.

And in the Cherry he does Nature vex,

To procreate without a Sex.

'Tis all enforc'd; the Fountain and the Grot;

While the sweet Fields do lye forgot:

Where willing Nature does to all dispence

A wild and fragrant Innocence:

And Fauns and Faryes do the Meadows till,

More by their presence then their skill.

Their Statues polish'd by some ancient hand,

May to adorn the Gardens stand:

But howso'ere the Figures do excel,

The Gods themselves with us do dwell.










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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Marvell\'s poem here suggests his critical analysis of humans distancing from nature. With their intelligence came the ability to medal and separated from nature as a dominant species could exploit all other life forms.
The second criticism is of religion and it\'s use as an avoidance of responsibility. In fact we are our own gods and are conscious beings hence \"The gods themselves with us do dwell\"

| Posted on 2012-11-20 | by a guest


.: :.

Andrew Marvell was a Metaphysical poet (1621-1678), therefore his poem, \"The Mower\" relates to another world, the God-like world, and in this case, the Garden of Eden. The opening line, \"Luxurious man\", refers to man\'s desire for luxury and his lust for these new, interbred flowers, and as we know, lust is one of the seven deadly sins. Keeping in tone with religion, the luxurious garden that Marvell describes can be suggested as the opposite of the Garden of Eden, which is pure and natural. One could mention that pain is being inflicted on the plants by the line, \"And learned to interline his cheek\" as the plants are personified so that the reader gets a sense of their pain. My final point is that Marvell implies man is medling with God\'s creation by interbreeding flowers.

| Posted on 2012-05-12 | by a guest


.: :.

This is the first poem in the series of \'Mower\' poems by Marvell. In the poem, Marvell makes the flowers seem extremely artificial and almost makes it seem as if it is painful for the flowers, through the use of personification - \'And learn\'d to interline its cheek\' - the negativity hinted in this shows how unnatural it is for the flower, and words like \'complexion\' make the flowers, like humans, seem as if they are caking on make-up which is obviously not what God intended. Like \'The Garden\', this poem condemns gardens and what they represent; which may come as a surprise when one is reminded of the Garden of Eden in religious terms. But, this garden does have connotations, as it was the place where God and Mankind were initially set apart. Gardens are also seen as too perfect, too limited and fake. There is no place in a garden for an \'ugly\' plant. The biblical image we think of, with trees and flowers is not a garden, but indeed nature itself in its pure, God-given form.
J.A

| Posted on 2011-03-04 | by a guest


.: :.

This is the first poem in the series of \'Mower\' poems by Marvell. In the poem, Marvell makes the flowers seem extremely artificial and almost makes it seem as if it is painful for the flowers, through the use of personification - \'And learn\'d to interline its cheek\' - the negativity hinted in this shows how unnatural it is for the flower, and words like \'complexion\' make the flowers, like humans, seem as if they are caking on make-up which is obviously not what God intended. Like \'The Garden\', this poem condemns gardens and what they represent; which may come as a surprise when one is reminded of the Garden of Eden in religious terms. But, this garden does have connotations, as it was the place where God and Mankind were initially set apart. Gardens are also seen as too perfect, too limited and fake. There is no place in a garden for an \'ugly\' plant. The biblical image we think of, with trees and flowers is not a garden, but indeed nature itself in its pure, God-given form.
J.A

| Posted on 2011-03-04 | by a guest


.: :.

The seventeenth century was an era of beautiful poetry, Andrew Marvell was one of the poets who wrote about metaphysical conceit and "The Mower Against Gardens" is a great example of this.
The poem talks about human interference of nature. In the time the poem was written tulip buds were widely desired, inter-breeding was used to create personalised tulips of a certain size or colour, tampering with God's creation, you could say.

| Posted on 2010-05-27 | by a guest




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