famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

Ode On Indolence Analysis



Author: Poetry of John Keats Type: Poetry Views: 941

Sponsored Links





One morn before me were three figures seen,

I With bowed necks, and joined hands, side-faced;

And one behind the other stepp'd serene,

In placid sandals, and in white robes graced;

They pass'd, like figures on a marble urn,

When shifted round to see the other side;

They came again; as when the urn once more

Is shifted round, the first seen shades return;

And they were strange to me, as may betide

With vases, to one deep in Phidian lore.



How is it, Shadows! that I knew ye not?

How came ye muffled in so hush a masque?

Was it a silent deep-disguised plot

To steal away, and leave without a task

My idle days? Ripe was the drowsy hour;

The blissful cloud of summer-indolence

Benumb'd my eyes; my pulse grew less and less;

Pain had no sting, and pleasure's wreath no flower:

O, why did ye not melt, and leave my sense

Unhaunted quite of all but---nothingness?



A third time came they by;---alas! wherefore?

My sleep had been embroider'd with dim dreams;

My soul had been a lawn besprinkled o'er

With flowers, and stirring shades, and baffled beams:

The morn was clouded, but no shower fell,

Tho' in her lids hung the sweet tears of May;

The open casement press'd a new-leav'd vine,

Let in the budding warmth and throstle's lay;

O Shadows! 'twas a time to bid farewell!

Upon your skirts had fallen no tears of mine.



A third time pass'd they by, and, passing, turn'd

Each one the face a moment whiles to me;

Then faded, and to follow them I burn'd

And ached for wings, because I knew the three;

The first was a fair maid, and Love her name;

The second was Ambition, pale of cheek,

And ever watchful with fatigued eye;

The last, whom I love more, the more of blame

Is heap'd upon her, maiden most unmeek,---

I knew to be my demon Poesy.



They faded, and, forsooth! I wanted wings:

O folly! What is Love! and where is it?

And for that poor Ambition---it springs

From a man's little heart's short fever-fit;

For Poesy!---no,---she has not a joy,---

At least for me,---so sweet as drowsy noons,

And evenings steep'd in honied indolence;

O, for an age so shelter'd from annoy,

That I may never know how change the moons,

Or hear the voice of busy common-sense!



So, ye three Ghosts, adieu! Ye cannot raise

My head cool-bedded in the flowery grass;

For I would not be dieted with praise,

A pet-lamb in a sentimental farce!

Fade sofdy from my eyes, and be once more

In masque-like figures on the dreamy urn;

Farewell! I yet have visions for the night,

And for the day faint visions there is store;

Vanish, ye Phantoms! from my idle spright,

Into the clouds, and never more return!










Sponsor



Learn to Play Songs by Ear: Ear Training

122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

My weenie told me the other day that Ode to Indolence is exactly what it loves the most. Its 8 inches of meat is the longest thing she had ever seen and was excited to blow it.

| Posted on 2012-12-01 | by a guest


.: :.

My weenie told me the other day that Ode to Indolence is exactly what it loves the most. Its 8 inches of meat is the longest thing she had ever seen and was excited to blow it.

| Posted on 2012-12-01 | by a guest


.: :.

All the posts make good points, and I only have a few issues of disagreement or to add. Keats does not give answers in his poetry but raises questions. The speaker is never exactly the poet himself, although in this poem they are close.
We all are torn between myriad desires, between being productive or indolent. Keats is offering the same kind of divisive thoughts we all have - we are moved by passion or necessity, but we battle the inertia of sweet indolence, especially on a drowsy spring day.
In Keats' case, facing death figures large. So does the exhausting passion of youthful unrequited love, and the ambitious drive of a poet who seems to be on the cusp of recognition - early scathing reviews are countered by a hint of some respectful recognition.
Could he really give up his three passions for indolence? Of course not. His speculations are Pyrrhic, "empty virgins" as another Romantic once said. His passion is all consuming, ambition rides him hard (especially knowing how little time he has to make his mark), and the thought of giving up Poesy is an absurd pipe dream. He is teasing himself, and us. He knows, deep inside, that he can never make his Phantoms disappear, nor can any of us. His last few lines are loaded with the unfulfilled feelings, the impotence, the repressed anger and the sweet sufferings of his short life. we might as well be shouting at the stars to stand still in the heavens as for the temptations of indolence or the heat our passions to stop tormenting us as long as we continue to breath.
Please don't copy this - just think about it.
M. Dee

| Posted on 2010-04-24 | by a guest


.: :.

Bad health and misfortune plagued John Keats from his birth in 1795. Soon after his parents died early on, his health became a facet of his life that assured him an early death. He continued to write poetry throughout his short-lived life to illustrate his inner most anguish that came as a result of unrequited love and his looming death. In this three figures on a marble urn confront him while he studies the outer surface. These three figures which he later indentifies as Love, Ambition, and Poesy attempt to lure him away from his languid life full of indolence for one dictated by the three. The speaker, abandoning his praise for peaceful indolence, becomes greatly interested by these figures, feeling a sudden urge to sprout wings and follow the three before he then revokes these very desires and demands “Vanish, ye phantoms, from my idle spright, Into the clouds, and never more return!” In the ode, Keats utilizes the speaker’s dilemma to convey his agonizing frustration that spurs from the inevitability of death and his knowledge that his life would soon be ending.
Keats’ vivid word choice throughout the poem follows the narrators conflicting desires as he struggles to continue with his life of indolence or pursue a more involved life full of Love, Ambition, and Poesy. These conflicting desires ultimately come to represent Keats’ own aspiration to avoid everything that makes his life worth living because they make the inevitable dying process far more difficult.
“How is it, shadows, that I knew ye not?
How came ye muffled in so hush a masque?
Was it a silent deep-disguised plot
To steal away, and leave without a task
My idle days? Ripe was the drowsy hour;
The blissful cloud of summer-indolence
Benumb'd my eyes; my pulse grew less and less;
Pain had no sting, and pleasure's wreath no flower.
O, why did ye not melt, and leave my sense
Unhaunted quite of all but - nothingness?” (Second Stanza)
In the second stanza the narrator states “the blissful cloud of summer-indolence benumb’d my eyes; my pulse grew less and less; Pain had no sting, and pleasure’s wreath no flower.” In this line, Keats depicts his own experience in his final years. In this “blissful cloud of indolence” he conveys that the pain and frustration that comes with life can be avoided simply by evading the aspects of life that cause just that; a life of indolence does not allow for a life of ache because nothing is present to cause pain.
In the fourth stanza, the speaker states:
“They faded, and, forsooth! I wanted wings:
O folly! What is Love? and where is it?
And for that poor Ambition - it springs
From a man's little heart's short fever-fit;
For Poesy! - no, - she has not a joy, -
At least for me, - so sweet as drowsy noons,
And evenings steep'd in honied indolence;
O, for an age so shelter'd from annoy,
That I may never know how change the moons,
Or hear the voice of busy common-sense!”
The speaker denounces his earlier desire to follow the Love, Ambition, and Poesy because he reasons that love is momentary and short-lived, ambition ultimately leaves a man disappointed, and poesy cannot compare to “drowsy noons… steep’d in honied indolence.” In the end, the speaker condemns the three figures and decides to spend his days wrapped in indolence.
The speaker’s strong reproach of love and ambition arouse from their requirement that he actually live his life with passion, which provide a threat of eventual pain and ultimate failure. He refers to poesy as taking the form of demon because of its immortality and its entailment for him to keenly examine his own emotions, which inevitably runs the risk of arousing love and ambition once more.
Like the speaker, Keats comes to realize that by avoiding the things in life that make it worth living, the experience of death in itself become easy. His love for a woman that he could never marry, his ambition to be successful, and his admiration for poetry plagued Keats because he knew his illness would soon leave him no more and all of these characteristics gave him a reason to crave an extended life. By dismissing or forgetting them, the agonizing revelations stimulated on his death bed would no longer present themselves. In the end, the speaker’s decision to maintain his life of indolence directly correlates to Keats’ desire to dismiss the things in his life that make it worth living due to the knowledge of his ominous death.
-Trent Reece 2009

| Posted on 2009-11-23 | by a guest


.: :.

I don't agree with your last paragraph. Keats wasn't tired of fame and people wasn't clamoring for more because at that time, Keats and his poetry wasn't very popular due to the fact that he was very criticized by the government and by the people. Despite this fact, it is a good analysis

| Posted on 2009-08-25 | by a guest


.: :) :.

Sweet Indolence
copyright 2005 punjabiz.org NO STEALING


“Ode to Indolence” is neither the longest nor the shortest of John Keats’ odes. He writes 10 lines in a stanza with 6 lines per stanza, using iambic pentameter. He writes with an ab ab cde cde rhyming pattern in each stanza.

In the first stanza of “Ode to Indolence” Keats introduces three strange figures. The creatures form a circle, but look like the relief of an urn. It is almost as if they are flat; they move as if part of a turning urn. It is hard to tell at this point if the characters are completely flat or slightly two-dimensional. If vases are strange to a student of sculpture (p855, ln 9-10), then the figures must not be three-dimensional. These forms are dressed in white and have “placid” (855, ln 4) sandals. Keats could mean that they are serene, not speaking to him in the quietness of the room. However, he could mean that the figures are complacent – they just go around in their circle, not really doing anything, and not caring if he notices them.

In the second stanza, Keats speculates about why the three figures are there. He mentions being drowsy without pinpointing the time of day. He could just be waking, going to sleep, or preparing to nap. Keats wants to keep his days idle. He enjoys his “summer-indolence” (855, ln 16); summer is the season where idleness is a sweet treasure. As Keats slips into the oblivion of sleep, he does not care about pain nor pleasure. He wants the strangers gone so he does not have to think. His sleep allows him to flee everything, but their presence interrupts his escape. They make him uneasy and he wonders whom they are and why they are there.

In the next stanza, the figures continue to move in a circle. However, this time they actually turn and face Keats; he now knows who visits. Love, Ambition, and Poesy are the interlopers. Suddenly they disappear – leaving him curious. Love, Ambition, and his Muse come in to arouse him and then depart, leaving him bereft. He calls Poesy an “unmeek maiden” (855, ln 29) and “demon” (855, ln 30). His inspiration tortures and torments him.

Keats moves on into the fourth stanza. As the figures fade suddenly, so does indolence. Keats decides he wants to give chase to the figures. Love is elusive; Keats wants to fly after love for he cannot find it. Ambition is fleeting; it is short-lived and he wants to capture some of it. But he does not want to chase his Muse. Poesy interrupts noontime naps and evening relaxation. She pokes, she prods, and she pushes him into putting words and thoughts on paper. She cajoles, she pleads, and she begs to be heard. When he desires to sleep, she wants to jump on the bed. When he needs to eat, she clears the table to get his attention. When he wants to be left alone, she is there chattering in his ear, reminding him it is time to put pen to paper. So no, he does not want to chase Poesy. He would, in fact, like it if she skulked away.
Stanza five starts with the three figures moving by Keats once more, just as he finally fades into sleep. He starts to dream of being in a field with flowers and the promise of rain. He is happy to be rid of the shadows; he does not cry to see them go.

In the final stanza, Keats tells the shadows to leave, that he is happy where he is. He does not want to write, to be fawned over by adoring fans. He is tired of adulation. Keats wants the figures to return to their urn and let him be. He decides that he does not want anything to do with the shadows after all. Love will just make him hurt. Ambition will only give him things to do. And Poesy will hound him day and night, giving him no rest.

Keats is tired of writing and tired of fame. He just wants a little peace and quiet. If he was not feeling like writing, people were probably clamoring for more. He does not want his Muse to rule his life, so he decided a little idleness might be nice for a while. Even God rested on the seventh day. We should do no less. ©2005 Mr_Singh
(Yeah, I know I'm posting this on the 'net, but it's still stealing if you take it.)

| Posted on 2005-12-03 | by Approved Guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

Ode On Indolence Analysis John Keats critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Ode On Indolence Analysis John Keats Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Ode On Indolence Analysis John Keats itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education homework forum help



Poetry 203
Poetry 56
Poetry 16
Poetry 144
Poetry 36
Poetry 48
Poetry 41
Poetry 117
Poetry 160
Poetry 195
Poetry 160
Poetry 8
Poetry 44
Poetry 214
Poetry 7
Poetry 139
Poetry 151
Poetry 153
Poetry 212
Poetry 63