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Holy Sonnet X Analysis



Author: Poetry of John Donne Type: Poetry Views: 4777





Death, be not proud, though some have called thee

Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;

For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow,

Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,

Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,

And soonest our best men with thee do go,

Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery.

Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,

And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell;

And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well

And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?

One short sleep past, we wake eternally,

And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.










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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Why are we using the incorrect punctuation of this holy sonnet for this?
It\'s technically correct, but not authentic.
The end should read, \"Death shall be no more, death, thou shalt die.\" No exclamation point, no semi colon, and no captial D. This, which is faithful to the original, portrays death as nothing more than a pause; a \"comma.\" It\'s not a grand, dramatic event to be shouted about with capital letters and exclamation points.

| Posted on 2011-01-23 | by a guest


.: :.

John Donne was a famous preacher of his time and he wrote this poem just after his wife died. He begins by discussing the fear of death than the power of death. but death should not be proud because in the end, after one short sleep, we wake eternally and death will have no more power over us. death, thou shalt die!

| Posted on 2010-07-07 | by a guest


.: :.

John Donne is simply stating the death does not seek only the rich, poor or only the healthiest. He is saying that anyone and everyone is going to be taken by death

| Posted on 2010-04-19 | by a guest


.: :.

Donne is so afraid of death that he turns to the irrational to explain his existence and give it meaning.Overall I would assign this garble and mangling of the english language a three shiny objects out of fifty.

| Posted on 2009-12-04 | by a guest


.: Devils Advocate :.

I agree that Donne is adressing Death in a personafied form, yet the pauses throughout the poem shed light to the possibility that Donne himself feared Death's power. It appears Donne knew of his fear of dying but also knew he had little to fear. As if Donne wrote this as encouragement for himself before death. Donee addresses his own fear by acknowledging that all die ,yet he holds to his belief in eternity to quiet his fears. Donne does show that mankind has nothing to fear, because Death brings pleasure and eternitay after one quick sleep.

| Posted on 2008-01-31 | by a guest


.: Devils Advocate :.

I agree that Donne is adressing Death in a personafied form, yet the pauses throughout the poem shed light to the possibility that Donne himself feared Death's power. It appears Donne knew of his fear of dying but also knew he had little to fear. As if Donne wrote this as encouragement for himself before death. Donee addresses his own fear by acknowledging that all die ,yet he holds to his belief in eternity to quiet his fears. Donne does show that mankind has nothing to fear, because Death brings pleasure and eternitay after one quick sleep.

| Posted on 2008-01-31 | by a guest


.: i agree with the 1st one :.

In the first sentence, which is also the intro to the song 'Follow the Reaper' by "Children of Bodom", he is speaking directly to death. He is saying for death not to be proud of what death has done to men and to this world, and he says that even though people have called death Mighty and dreadful, death isn't either of those things. I agree with amun that he was trying to conquer people's fears about death. He has a view of eternal life that others do not see. The last sentence is like him speaking to death and telling death to die, which means that others can also conquer their fears about death.

| Posted on 2007-08-07 | by a guest


.: theme :.



Donne obviously believed in eternal life and saw death as the door. He also mentions mortal ways to die, kings, disease, all
catalysts we can ride into the next world.

A poet's glimpse into other realities is priceless. What Donne saw in death is no more dangerous than sleep or opium, no more forboding than our dreams.

And death serves as the ultimate fear for most humans. Donne is simply trying to conquer human fears about death. After all, how could we live graciously otherwise?

| Posted on 2005-12-02 | by amun


.: I Disagree :.

Donne's observation of death is neither dillusional nor irreverant. He has personified death and speaks directly to it so that the audience can witness his own approach to death, and in doing so life also. Death is just a passing of time, an instant connecting one moment to the next. Death is born and dies instantly, and it's Donne's bridge to eternal life. As for the suggestion of suicide to alter his mindset, he adressed that already when speaking of death's being slave to desperate men. Anyway, Donne simply wants the reader to understand that his death will become a part of his life rather than for his life to be taken by death. That's just how I understand it.

| Posted on 2005-08-30 | by Approved Guest


.: posterity of death :.

donne pressents death as a unique entity enitirely bequeathed and infatuated with itself. Where forth is the humbleness of such an absorbed and dillusional author? Shame on the integrity of Donne, the literary monogamous. Just observe the irreverence to which Donne ultimately scathes with on the unimportant topic of death. He should consider the options of suicide and alter his mindset entirely in order to find an accurate account of reality in its sincerest forms. Overall I would assign this garble and mangling of the english language a three shiny objects out of fifty.

| Posted on 2005-01-03 | by Approved Guest




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