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Youth And Age Analysis



Author: Poetry of Samuel Taylor Coleridge Type: Poetry Views: 981





Verse, a Breeze 'mid blossoms straying,

Where HOPE clung feeding, like a bee--

Both were mine ! Life went a-maying

With NATURE, HOPE, and POESY,

[Image][Image]When I was young !



When I was young ?--Ah, woful WHEN !

Ah ! for the Change 'twixt Now and Then !

This breathing House not built with hands,

This body that does me grievous wrong,

O'er śry Cliffs and glittering Sands,

How lightly then it flashed along :--

Like those trim skiffs, unknown of yore,

On winding lakes and rivers wide,

That ask no aid of Sail or Oar,

That fear no spite of Wind or Tide !

Nought cared this Body for wind or weather

When YOUTH and I lived in't together.



FLOWERS are lovely ; LOVE is flower-like ;

FRIENDSHIP is a sheltering tree ;

O ! the Joys, that came down shower-like,

Of FRIENDSHIP, LOVE, and LIBERTY,

[Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] Ere I was old !



Ere I was old ? Ah woful ERE,

Which tells me, YOUTH'S no longer here !

O YOUTH ! for years so many and sweet,

'Tis known, that Thou and I were one,

I'll think it but a fond conceit--

It cannot be that Thou art gone !

Thy Vesper-bell hath not yet toll'd :--

And thou wert aye a Masker bold !

What strange Disguise hast now put on,

To make believe, that thou art gone ?

I see these Locks in silvery slips,

This drooping Gait, this altered Size :

But SPRINGTIDE blossoms on thy Lips,

And Tears take sunshine from thine eyes !

Life is but Thought : so think I will

That YOUTH and I are House-mates still.



Dew-drops are the gems of morning,

But the tears of mournful eve !

Where no hope is, life's a warning

That only serves to make us grieve,

[Image][Image]When we are old :



That only serves to make us grieve

With oft and tedious taking-leave,

Like some poor nigh-related guest,

That may not rudely be dismist ;

Yet hath outstay'd his welcome while,

And tells the jest without the smile.








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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

@ above both.
this is all crap.any 1 can get it on any site.here v want an analysis of this poem ... not this stupid explanation which we can find any where...

| Posted on 2010-04-11 | by a guest


.: coleridge :.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge's place in the canon of English poetry rests on a comparatively small body of achievement: a few poems from the late 1790s and early 1800s and his participation in the revolutionary publication of Lyrical Ballads in 1797. Unlike Wordsworth, his work cannot be understood through the lens of the 1802 preface to the second edition of that book; though it does resemble Wordsworth's in its idealization of nature and its emphasis on human joy, Coleridge's poems often favor musical effects over the plainness of common speech. The intentional archaisms of "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" and the hypnotic drone of "Kubla Khan" do not imitate common speech, creating instead a more strikingly stylized effect.
Further, Coleridge's poems complicate the phenomena Wordsworth takes for granted: the simple unity between the child and nature and the adult's reconnection with nature through memories of childhood; in poems such as "Frost at Midnight," Coleridge indicates the fragility of the child's innocence by relating his own urban childhood. In poems such as "Dejection: An Ode" and "Nightingale," he stresses the division between his own mind and the beauty of the natural world. Finally, Coleridge often privileges weird tales and bizarre imagery over the commonplace, rustic simplicities Wordsworth advocates; the "thousand thousand slimy things" that crawl upon the rotting sea in the "Rime" would be out of place in a Wordsworth poem.
If Wordsworth represents the central pillar of early Romanticism, Coleridge is nevertheless an important structural support. His emphasis on the imagination, its independence from the outside world and its creation of fantastic pictures such as those found in the "Rime," exerted a profound










influence on later writers such as Shelley; his depiction of feelings of alienation and numbness helped to define more sharply the Romantics' idealized contrast between the emptiness of the city--where such feelings are experienced--and the joys of nature. The heightened understanding of these feelings also helped to shape the stereotype of the suffering Romantic genius, often further characterized by drug addiction: this figure of the idealist, brilliant yet tragically unable to attain his own ideals, is a major pose for Coleridge in his poetry.
His portrayal of the mind as it moves, whether in silence ("Frost at Midnight") or in frenzy ("Kubla Khan") also helped to define the intimate emotionalism of Romanticism; while much of poetry is constituted of emotion recollected in tranquility, the origin of Coleridge's poems often seems to be emotion recollected in emotion. But (unlike Wordsworth, it could be argued) Coleridge maintains not only an emotional intensity but also a legitimate intellectual presence throughout his oeuvre and applies constant philosophical pressure to his ideas. In his later years, Coleridge worked a great deal on metaphysics and politics, and a philosophical consciousness infuses much of his verse--particularly poems such as "The Nightingale" and "Dejection: An Ode," in which the relationship between mind and nature is defined via the specific rejection of fallacious versions of it. The mind, to Coleridge, cannot take its feeling from nature and cannot falsely imbue nature with its own feeling; rather, the mind must be so suffused with its own joy that it opens up to the real, independent, "immortal" joy of nature.




| Posted on 2007-11-07 | by a guest


.: coleridge :.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge's place in the canon of English poetry rests on a comparatively small body of achievement: a few poems from the late 1790s and early 1800s and his participation in the revolutionary publication of Lyrical Ballads in 1797. Unlike Wordsworth, his work cannot be understood through the lens of the 1802 preface to the second edition of that book; though it does resemble Wordsworth's in its idealization of nature and its emphasis on human joy, Coleridge's poems often favor musical effects over the plainness of common speech. The intentional archaisms of "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" and the hypnotic drone of "Kubla Khan" do not imitate common speech, creating instead a more strikingly stylized effect.
Further, Coleridge's poems complicate the phenomena Wordsworth takes for granted: the simple unity between the child and nature and the adult's reconnection with nature through memories of childhood; in poems such as "Frost at Midnight," Coleridge indicates the fragility of the child's innocence by relating his own urban childhood. In poems such as "Dejection: An Ode" and "Nightingale," he stresses the division between his own mind and the beauty of the natural world. Finally, Coleridge often privileges weird tales and bizarre imagery over the commonplace, rustic simplicities Wordsworth advocates; the "thousand thousand slimy things" that crawl upon the rotting sea in the "Rime" would be out of place in a Wordsworth poem.
If Wordsworth represents the central pillar of early Romanticism, Coleridge is nevertheless an important structural support. His emphasis on the imagination, its independence from the outside world and its creation of fantastic pictures such as those found in the "Rime," exerted a profound










influence on later writers such as Shelley; his depiction of feelings of alienation and numbness helped to define more sharply the Romantics' idealized contrast between the emptiness of the city--where such feelings are experienced--and the joys of nature. The heightened understanding of these feelings also helped to shape the stereotype of the suffering Romantic genius, often further characterized by drug addiction: this figure of the idealist, brilliant yet tragically unable to attain his own ideals, is a major pose for Coleridge in his poetry.
His portrayal of the mind as it moves, whether in silence ("Frost at Midnight") or in frenzy ("Kubla Khan") also helped to define the intimate emotionalism of Romanticism; while much of poetry is constituted of emotion recollected in tranquility, the origin of Coleridge's poems often seems to be emotion recollected in emotion. But (unlike Wordsworth, it could be argued) Coleridge maintains not only an emotional intensity but also a legitimate intellectual presence throughout his oeuvre and applies constant philosophical pressure to his ideas. In his later years, Coleridge worked a great deal on metaphysics and politics, and a philosophical consciousness infuses much of his verse--particularly poems such as "The Nightingale" and "Dejection: An Ode," in which the relationship between mind and nature is defined via the specific rejection of fallacious versions of it. The mind, to Coleridge, cannot take its feeling from nature and cannot falsely imbue nature with its own feeling; rather, the mind must be so suffused with its own joy that it opens up to the real, independent, "immortal" joy of nature.




| Posted on 2007-11-07 | by deema




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