famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

We Grow Accustomed To The Dark Analysis



Author: poetry of Emily Dickinson Type: poetry Views: 5926

We grow accustomed to the Dark—
When light is put away—
As when the Neighbor holds the Lamp
To witness her Goodbye—

A Moment—We uncertain step
For newness of the night—
Then—fit our Vision to the Dark—
And meet the Road—erect—

And so of larger—Darkness—
Those Evenings of the Brain—
When not a Moon disclose a sign—
Or Star—come out—within—

The Bravest—grope a little—
And sometimes hit a Tree
Directly in the Forehead—
But as they learn to see—

Either the Darkness alters—
Or something in the sight
Adjusts itself to Midnight—
And Life steps almost straight.





Sponsor


122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

CAN SOMEONE PLEASE DO AN ANALYSIS DESCRIBING THE THEME < I NEED IT FOR MY ENGLISH CLASS PRONTO

| Posted on 2014-04-05 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe that this poem is talking about a person’s struggles in life. It depicts the story of going on a journey, and how it can be frightening. You will encounter obstacles on your way, but you have to get over the things that may hold you back if you wish to reach your destination. At first you’d be hesitant and unsure of what you must do, but as you continue your journey you become more experienced and surer of yourself. The poem continues on to say that there will be times when you feel like there is no hope and you’re all alone, but those are just days you have to get through. Those who aren’t discouraged even after encountering these difficulties will eventually learn what to do and be able to make the right decisions. And then finally things seem to be going right. This is either resulted in a change in the journey you were taking or a change in yourself.

| Posted on 2012-11-17 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this poem represents a loss of a loved one

| Posted on 2012-11-07 | by a guest


.: :.

This is about a person going through a Hero\'s Journey and overcoming \"darkness\". The person gets used to and overcomes the darkness.

| Posted on 2011-02-07 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe that this poem is just talking about the struggle of life. It has a mysterious edge to it.
The central message is that through darkness everything is stripped away from us, and what's left is the truth.
Also through darkness we understand and appreciate the light and truth much more.
"We grow accustomed to the dark"
It has a depressing sound to it, as if all we can do is learn to cope with the darkness of the world but when you read it over a few more times you realize that it's about learning how to cope but also how to become a stronger person and that sometimes the darkness can be beautiful and attractive.
It's easier to ignore the truth and live in fear but once we get over our doubts, though it's difficult we can change the darkness to light. We can live in truth, in goodness and in harmony but it's scary, suffer through much and sometimes there are consquences but living the right way in truth without fear is worth the journey of getting there.

| Posted on 2010-06-17 | by a guest


.: :.

Clearly Emily is speaking about her last trip to Six Flags Great Adventure in which she overcame her fear of nighttime rollercoster rides.

| Posted on 2009-11-02 | by a guest


.: :.

People are dying ok! They die and grow accustomed to the dark. Duh.

| Posted on 2009-04-29 | by a guest


.: :.

she's talking about insanity. i don't have time to fully explain right now. look at the last stanza. it means either her insanity gets better *the darkness alters* or her insanity becomes sanity to her.it becomes the norm for her. and she goes on. almost normally. *life steps almost straight*

| Posted on 2008-07-13 | by a guest


.: response :.

I believe that Emily is trying to relate trying to find one's place in a corrupt society/world and the struggles that go with that to obtaining your night vision when walking in the dark. I believe that Emily was a deeper person than writing what she literally means. I know that this seems like a stretch but go with me....

the word "accustomed" means frequently practiced, a habit; so trying to relate that to depression is more of a stretch. I don't know anyone who would frequently practice being depressed, do you? What I heard from this poem was that "we" or society live in darkness and "we" fit our vision or way of thinking to the corruption. In the last stanza she says the " Either the Darkness alters--Or something in the sight adjusts itself to Midnight--and life steps almost straight."; I believe that she is saying that we start to see throught the eyes of the corruption or we become comfortable with ourselves and become successful which results in the our life stepping "almost straight." Emily is subtly criticizing her modern day society.


| Posted on 2007-02-28 | by a guest


.: Flin-Flon :.

Yonkers! Seventeen sailors trapped in a square disc--But wait! Ninja sandwich plus Devil Delicious in the quality of York! ...Yet one must often hone one's distress signals to one's own distress, and the sands of Time do shift often and violently. Blame it on Human nature. Blame it on nuclear tea parties. Blame it on Divinity. Around the bush We often beat, yet blame all but Ourselves. I am made to be sick, to be ecstatic all at once, for the World is nothing anymore...unless someone makes it Something. Signatures are for those who wish to be all but discovered.

| Posted on 2006-06-04 | by Approved Guest


.: :.

Analysis

-- : Notes : --
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What's wrong with clichés? First person? Do I have style?

We've all seen the teen angst poems. They directly state how the person feels usually in first person asking rhetorical questions and some repetition. Most the time they're just journal entrees. Add some spacing and repetition and call it poetry. We've all looked to the greats, in any field, and asked what defined them as being so unique. Here is an example that was on the advanced placement (AP) english exam recently calling for a analysis of how rhetoric(imagery, diction, structure, etc) was used to effectively portray the piece. The theme is common, but you feel the personality and style of the author in the way it is portrayed. It's not abstract words put together that just sound good or purely imagery based strength. The poem requires time to effectively understand and connect with.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-- : Text : --
------------------------------------
"We grow accustomed to the dark"
By Emily Dickinson
-------------------------------------

We grow accustomed to the Dark—
When light is put away—
As when the Neighbor holds the Lamp
To witness her Goodbye—

A Moment—We uncertain step
For newness of the night—
Then—fit our Vision to the Dark—
And meet the Road—erect—

And so of larger—Darkness—
Those Evenings of the Brain—
When not a Moon disclose a sign—
Or Star—come out—within—

The Bravest—grope a little—
And sometimes hit a Tree
Directly in the Forehead—
But as they learn to see—

Either the Darkness alters—
Or something in the sight
Adjusts itself to Midnight—
And Life steps almost straight.
-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------


Take a moment to read through. Before you go on. Try to come up with your own analysis of the
poem and it's meaning.


.................................................




..............................



...................




..............




......



..




.





--: Structure : --
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
People rarely pay attention to the formatting yet it's the very important. Did you catch it? Look at the dashes. What do the dashes mean? Stop, pause, wait, end, say nothing... It immediately breaks the movement. We relate darkness with nothingness. In the context of this poem it most likely means inner conflict.
The mind subconsciously repeats this after ever pause, after every dash.

Look at the words it is used after. Dark, away, goodby, midnight. Look even further. Look at the words it doesn't use it on.
Lamp- it illuminates the darkness hence, no dash.
Step- without light, direction doesn't exist. To step is defined as to move forward. If everything is dark, and there is nothing, there is no meaning for the word, thus, it breaks the darkness.
Tree- trees are symbolic for wisdom. This poem is about emotional struggles. If there were wisdom, the troubles wouldn't be. Darkness is symbolic for emotional conflict, so if she had the wisdom to feel at peace, there would be no struggle.
Sight- sight is defined by light.
Straight - straight is defined by direction. There is no direction in darkness. No dash. That's the only last line of the stanza that doesn't have a dash. It's the conclusion, it doesn't end in darkness.

You may argue why the dash is there after brain, see, and forehead.
Brain- It's a conflict of the mind that causes the darkness.
Forehead- "and sometimes hit a tree," the darkness is right in front.
See- She doesn't mean visually. To finally 'see' is the enlightenment sought after.

"Or Star—come out—within—"
Within is mentally. No solution to the conflict. The line is about the inner search for 'light'. The amount of dashes in that line help emphases how the feeling of hopelessness keeps plaguing in the search for that light and the desperation of the situation.

"The Bravest—grope a little"
The bravest still have darkness ahead. They can't fight against it or 'kill' it, but must acknowledge it exists.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--: Content : --
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'll break this apart step by step. This is my reasoning through the lines. Others can make their own connections. If I made a mistake or you'd like to add something somewhere let me know.


We grow accustomed to the Dark—

Ask, "what does she mean by dark?" I guess as a little kid I didn't like it but now I'm fine with it, but does she mean it literally?

When light is put away—

Well, yeah, it gets dark when you turn the light off. Wait... she didn't say off, she said 'away'. What is illuminating that gets put away?

As when the Neighbor holds the Lamp

Neighbors can be referenced biblically as common man or, "others". It could mean friend. They hold the 'lamp'?

To witness her Goodbye—

Parting is sad. So 'she' holds the light. She wouldn't say goodbye if there wasn't a connection. Since it comes so quickly and has such psychological effects, it could mean a death.

A Moment—We uncertain step
For newness of the night—

She is gone. It could mean the author feels undefined. There is nobody else. She doesn't exist. What do actions really mean if we're alone. The other person or people gave meaning. Picture yourself as the only person on earth, everyone disappears. How would your ambitions, worries, and self perception change. Everything would be undefined.

Then—fit our Vision to the Dark—
And meet the Road—erect—

As we adjust our eyes when it is dark, she had to adjust her perception of her life when there was no one. Roads are the means of transportation. If they're vertical they impede our movement forward and leave us in a wreck.

And so of larger—Darkness—

Compared to the memories of the friend, turning to the big picture, emptiness.

Those Evenings of the Brain—

Time has passed and no improvement in the, if I can call it that, depression.

When not a Moon disclose a sign—

No light. Perhaps it means interaction with others or love. Whatever you relate it to, it's gone. Not even the moon gives a hint of light. Things seem hopeless.

Or Star—come out—within—

Moving on with life. The dashes help emphasize the desperation and frustration of the situation(see structure section).

The Bravest—grope a little—

Grope is to feel around. The problem is inward. Running forwards, trying to get away, denying that the problem exists. They can't fight it. Adding a dash in front of bravest indicates sarcasm.

And sometimes hit a Tree
Directly in the Forehead—
But as they learn to see—

The problem comes back. They finally run into some wisdom(trees symbolically) as they see running hits them with the same problem and gets them nowhere. Hitting the tree means finally acknowledging the problem exists. "as they learn to see"

Either the Darkness alters—
Or something in the sight
Adjusts itself to Midnight—
And Life steps almost straight.

It's the conclusion and fairly tricky to decipher. It could be translated in various ways. I'll let you play with this one. What do you think?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--: Conclusion : --
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The writing is at a higher depth of thought. It indirectly states emotions so the reader can better personally make their own connections. The structure is masterfully arranged and compliments the works. Common metaphors for many poems are 'darkness' and 'the light'. Line starters were simple: we, when, as, to, etc. It was in first person. The theme is not unique. Was it cliché? No, it was brilliantly pieced together in a unique way. The author's style was felt from the beginning.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



-=- This critique can be uploaded to any site -=- -=- as long as the information below must be kept intact-=- © Elite Skills ___---=-----------------------------------___ Critique by Jimmy Ruska Find more @ http://www.eliteskills.com/ ^-------------------------------------=---^

| Posted on 2006-03-23 | by Conquest


.: analysis :.

Emily Dickinson, born in 1830 and died in 1886, was an American lyrical poet, and an obsessively private writer. She did not respond well to any spotlight, and realized this after releasing only a couple of poems and taking no liking to the attention. Most of her works were discovered after her death, and it was then when she became famous. The poem We Grow Accustomed to the Dark is one of her poems that was found untitled, therefore taking the name of the first line from the first stanza. This poem describing darkness has a deeper, metaphorical meaning, which Dickinson creates in a more unique, effective manner.
This poem, like most of Dickinson’s poetry, is a lyric and is written in quatrains. Also, throughout the poem, the abundance of dashes is what is more than likely first noticed to all who reads this poem. It connects ideas and the movements described, as if there is no division of any task because the darkness cannot divide the movement. The flow of things is also very much affected in the darkness, and Dickinson does not use any rhyme scheme for that would defeat the purpose of the poem; disorder. This is a clever and detailed way to create a strong sense of being in the darkness.
Also, there is a lot of sensuous imagery that anyone could relate to and remember from ones own experience from walking in the dark, applying mostly to the sense of touch. “The Bravest—grope a little—/And sometimes hit a Tree” lines 1 and 2, stanza 4. By using “grope” and “hit a tree”, one can really relate that to feeling. The sense of sight is used as well as touch, however in the sense of describing what is difficult to see, rather than describing colour or something of the sort. “As when the Neighbour holds the Lamp/To witness her Goodbye—” lines 3 and 4, stanza one.
In addition, the importance of the poem is that it is a connotation; something that cannot be taken simply for face value. Every word in this poem has more of a meaning, reflecting life itself. In life, people deal with problems, and are faced with making decisions and discovery. One can probe and pick apart events in life and be left in dismay, however, eventually, one can adjust and take heed of what it is they’re doing. Emily Dickinson herself was more than likely in a troubled state of mind, being that she scarcely went outdoors to remain in the shadows of the world and of her mind. Therefore, this poem is not only dealing with physical darkness, but speaks of emotional darkness.
In conclusion, if not all can relate to the emotional darkness, then the physical darkness can be an experience of many. Dickinson did not only create the sense of loneliness one feels when surrounded by the darkness of the night, but also created the darkness of the mind; both which can be adjusted to, however inconvenient at the same time. She accomplished this by using touch sensory, dashes and the lack of rhyme scheme. This successfully created a metaphorical poem and a strong meaning. Thus, Dickinson created a poem that can be interpreted both figuratively and literally.


By Liane Leger

| Posted on 2005-05-01 | by Approved Guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

We Grow Accustomed To The Dark Analysis Emily Dickinson critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. We Grow Accustomed To The Dark Analysis Emily Dickinson Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique We Grow Accustomed To The Dark Analysis Emily Dickinson itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education homework forum help



Poetry 139
Poetry 56
Poetry 216
Poetry 66
Poetry 212
Poetry 35
Poetry 155
Poetry 6
Poetry 202
Poetry 183
Poetry 147
Poetry 208
Poetry 21
Poetry 216
Poetry 47
Poetry 113
Poetry 132
Poetry 184
Poetry 41
Poetry 155