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Lord Ullin's Daughter Analysis



Author: Poetry of Thomas Campbell Type: Poetry Views: 1149





A chieftain, to the Highlands bound,

Cries, ``Boatman, do not tarry!

And I'll give thee a silver pound

To row us o'er the ferry!''--



``Now, who be ye, would cross Lochgyle,

This dark and stormy weather?''

``O, I'm the chief of Ulva's isle,

And this, Lord Ullin's daughter.--



``And fast before her father's men

Three days we've fled together,

For should he find us in the glen,

My blood would stain the heather.



``His horsemen hard behind us ride;

Should they our steps discover,

Then who will cheer my bonny bride

When they have slain her lover?''--



Out spoke the hardy Highland wight,--

``I'll go, my chief--I'm ready:--

It is not for your silver bright;

But for your winsome lady:



``And by my word! the bonny bird

In danger shall not tarry;

So, though the waves are raging white,

I'll row you o'er the ferry.''--



By this the storm grew loud apace,

The water-wraith was shrieking;

And in the scowl of heaven each face

Grew dark as they were speaking.



But still as wilder blew the wind,

And as the night grew drearer,

Adown the glen rode armŤd men,

Their trampling sounded nearer.--



``O haste thee, haste!'' the lady cries,

``Though tempests round us gather;

I'll meet the raging of the skies,

But not an angry father.''--



The boat has left a stormy land,

A stormy sea before her,--

When, O! too strong for human hand,

The tempest gather'd o'er her.



And still they row'd amidst the roar

Of waters fast prevailing:

Lord Ullin reach'd that fatal shore,--

His wrath was changed to wailing.



For, sore dismay'd through storm and shade,

His child he did discover:--

One lovely hand she stretch'd for aid,

And one was round her lover.



``Come back! come back!'' he cried in grief

``Across this stormy water:

And I'll forgive your Highland chief,

My daughter!--O my daughter!''



'Twas vain: the loud waves lash'd the shore,

Return or aid preventing:

The waters wild went o'er his child,

And he was left lamenting.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

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i love dis poem to the core. and i hav cried reading only dis poem

| Posted on 2013-03-06 | by a guest


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Lord ullin\'s daughter is a poem of interest.It begins with a sad note by initiating the elopement of two young lovers.finally they reached to a place of safety as they approached to boatman and requested him to cross the river .Surprisingly the boatman also agree to do just because of the young and fair lady .In the end both the lovers face the dare consequences of a relationship which was not approved by the parents.

| Posted on 2012-12-28 | by a guest


.: :.

I like this poem. I am learning this at school. A very meaningfull poem. love it !! :)

| Posted on 2012-10-14 | by a guest


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hi.i really liked this poem a lot.the lady was ready to sacrifice herself with her love,although she was rich she loved a poor chief...

| Posted on 2012-10-07 | by a guest


.: :.

hi.i really liked this poem a lot.the lady was ready to sacrifice herself with her love,although she was rich she loved a poor chief...

| Posted on 2012-10-07 | by a guest


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it is a very nice story of love, tragedy, relation. lord ullin might have fist forgiven his daughter she might have been alive and happy with her lover and family.

| Posted on 2012-10-04 | by a guest


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hi im sameer of 9th grade Chennai pon vidyashram
i have given the complete analysis of this poem below
In the middle of the night, the chief of Ulvaís isle, accompanied with his bonny bird lady, Lord Ullinís daughter is in a hurry to cross the ferry. He asks the boatman to cross him and his lover despite the water, the stormy sea, the wind and the wild night.
The chief says that Lord Ullin does not agree with their love, the love of the chief and Lord Ullinís daughter. So he takes her away. Lord Ullin chases the chief with the help from many equestrians and armed too. Listening the story, the boatman agrees to cross them over. ďNot for moneyĒ, the boatman says. It is because the beauty and the charm of the of Lord Ullinís daughter that the boatman would cross them over.
now Lord Ullin and his men are near, they have already on their way. Lord Ullinís daughter now urges the boatman to be hurry eventhough they are going through the storm. She does not want to be chased and captured by his angry father.
Reaching the shore, Lord Ullinís anger turns to regret as he watches her daughter and her lover go to the raging storm. Lord Ullin will forgive her daughter and the chief if they comeback. Lord Ullinís daughter prefers the stormy sea rather than facing her angry father. Then there he was, Lord Ullin, cannot do anything. Sadly, he can only see her daughter on the deadly storm.
contact me at

| Posted on 2012-08-30 | by a guest


.: :.

hi im sameer of 9th grade Chennai pon vidyashram
i have given the complete analysis of this poem below
In the middle of the night, the chief of Ulvaís isle, accompanied with his bonny bird lady, Lord Ullinís daughter is in a hurry to cross the ferry. He asks the boatman to cross him and his lover despite the water, the stormy sea, the wind and the wild night.
The chief says that Lord Ullin does not agree with their love, the love of the chief and Lord Ullinís daughter. So he takes her away. Lord Ullin chases the chief with the help from many equestrians and armed too. Listening the story, the boatman agrees to cross them over. ďNot for moneyĒ, the boatman says. It is because the beauty and the charm of the of Lord Ullinís daughter that the boatman would cross them over.
now Lord Ullin and his men are near, they have already on their way. Lord Ullinís daughter now urges the boatman to be hurry eventhough they are going through the storm. She does not want to be chased and captured by his angry father.
Reaching the shore, Lord Ullinís anger turns to regret as he watches her daughter and her lover go to the raging storm. Lord Ullin will forgive her daughter and the chief if they comeback. Lord Ullinís daughter prefers the stormy sea rather than facing her angry father. Then there he was, Lord Ullin, cannot do anything. Sadly, he can only see her daughter on the deadly storm.

| Posted on 2012-08-30 | by a guest


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I\'m in 12th grade. Can I get a critical appreciation of this poem- analysis on use of literary devices?

| Posted on 2012-08-23 | by a guest


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i am in grade 9 and i dint understand the poem.by the analysis of the following guests it has given me an idea of what the poem is about.
thank u so much

| Posted on 2012-07-07 | by a guest


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Tis is a beautiful,touching sentimental love poem by Thomas Campbell.Its about two lovers,the young chief of ulva and lord ullin\'s daughter,who enlope.They are persued by Lord Ullin, who doesnt approve of his daughters choice of a poor chief, and his men for three days straight.Finall they end up at a loch and want to cross it in order to put some distance betweem them and Lord Ullin,who was closing on them.Unfotunately lady luck was not on their side.The weather was terrible and a horrible storm was ranging.They confronted the boat man and convinced him to row them accross the loch.Though he was innitially reluctent he then agreed to try row them accross to safety after considering their plight.That was not their day however and the weather and storm only became worse.The water was equally dangerous and easily overturned the boat leaving them to drown.When lord Ullin finally reached the spot,he was greeted by a sight of his beloved daughter drowning with one hand raised up for help and another around her lover.Lord Ullin\'s wrath turned into worry and he begged them to turn around romising them that he would forgive them and accept the lover.His pleading was in vain for they could not turn around and he was left lamenting on the shore.

| Posted on 2011-09-15 | by a guest


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The ballad is the story of an attempted elopement which results in the deaths of the couple. The fleeing lovers, the young \"chief of Ulva\'s isle\" and his \"bonny bride,\" Lord Ullin\'s daughter, have been hotly pursued by Lord Ullin and his horsemen for three days. Both know that the young man\'s life will be forfeit if they are captured. They approach a boatman to whom the young man offers money if he will row them over the ferry; that is, if he will take them across Lochgyle. The boatman, a \"hardy Highland wight,\" agrees to row them across in spite of the raging storm, not for money, but for the sake of the \"winsome lady.\" As the pursuers approach, the boat puts out into the stormy loch. When Lord Ullin reaches the shore, he is forced to watch his daughter and her lover drown as he calls out to them, vainly promising forgiveness to the young man if only they will return.
Read more: x

| Posted on 2011-09-15 | by a guest


.: :.

I read this poem in school 16 years back and again, today. All the while, it stayed in my mind - especially, the lines
\" One lovely hand she stretch\'d for aid,
And one was round her lover. \"

| Posted on 2011-08-19 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem depicts how a Scottish chieftain and his beloved elope to run away from her father, Lord Ullin .But as if God was also not on their side, met with a tragic death. They were engulfed by the fury of the stormy sea. Lord Ullin’s and his men chased his daughter and the chieftain on that fateful night. They soon reached the shore and tried to escape on a boat. The boat man was unwilling to row as the weather was dark and stormy. But the lovers persistence made him row. But soon they were caught in the violent storm of the sea and met their death in the lap of the waves. When Lord Ullin reached the shore with his men, his wrath changed to grief. He found his lovely daughter drowning with one hand stretched out for help and the other around her lover. Lord Ullin repented his deeds and wanted to forgive his daughter .But it was too late now his cries went in vain. The stormy sea had already claimed his daughter and her lover.

| Posted on 2010-10-24 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is basically a love story with a sad ending. Lord Ullin\'s daughter and her lover, the Chieftain of Ulva\'s Isle want to get married. Lord Ullin though, opposes this marriage. So they flee. Lord Ullin and his horsemen pursue them for three days straight till they find them in the hands of death. The couple has asked a boatman to row them over the sea but the ferry gets caught in the sea storm resulting in the deaths of all three of them. Lord Ullin weeps on the shore and is left lamenting as the sea takes over his daughter. Lord Ullin rashly promises to let them get married but in vain. Their lives come to an end in each others arms. =(

| Posted on 2010-10-24 | by a guest


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In 1795 Campbell visited Mull, one of the largest islands of the Inner Hebrides (Argyllshire, Scotland), and there sketched the ballad \"Lord Ullin\'s Daughter,\" which he reworked in 1804 and finally published in 1809. (3) The ballad is the story of an attempted elopement which results in the deaths of the couple. The fleeing lovers, the young \"chief of Ulva\'s isle\" and his \"bonny bride,\" Lord Ullin\'s daughter, have been hotly pursued by Lord Ullin and his horsemen for three days. Both know that the young man\'s life will be forfeit if they are captured. They approach a boatman to whom the young man offers money if he will row them over the ferry; that is, if he will take them across Lochgyle. The boatman, a \"hardy Highland wight,\" agrees to row them across in spite of the raging storm, not for money, but for the sake of the \"winsome lady.\" As the pursuers approach, the boat puts out into the stormy loch. When Lord Ullin reaches the shore, he is forced to watch his daughter and her lover drown as he calls out to them, vainly promising forgiveness to the young man if only they will return.

| Posted on 2010-09-17 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is a very very nice poem of Sir Thomas Chambell

| Posted on 2010-09-07 | by a guest




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