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    poetry


    dots Submission Name: Bad Museumdots
    --------------------------------------------------------





    Author: annie0888
    ASL Info:    49/f/LA
    Elite Ratio:    4.76 - 327/382/122
    Words: 274
    Class/Type: Misc/Misc
    Total Views: 1244
    Average Vote:    No vote yet.
    Bytes: 1669



    Description:
       Just for fun...sort of?


    Make the font bigger!! Double Spacing Back to recent posts.

    dotsBad Museumdots
    -------------------------------------------


    Welcome to the Smith Museum. Tours begin every fifteen minutes, three-hundred sixty-five days a year. Admission is free.

    This portrait is my mother.
    Plastic smile above the shoulders,
    But below, the fists and knees are clenched.

    This painting portrays my father.
    He's right there in that empty spot.
    He's a little hard to see, but you know he's there because of the kid crying in the foreground.

    My sister was the inspiration for this sculpture. Perfectly proportioned, with a smooth, flawless surface. But don't touch her.
    She's all crumbly underneath.

    My brother is in the water fountain, at the end of the hall right outside the restrooms. He loses a little pressure when they flush.

    I do all the framework myself, as the frames are so crucial to keeping the canvasses from becoming skewed and damaged. Sometimes it's the frame that makes the picture after all.

    We were hoping to acquire a new collection from the Jones Gallery across the street, but it turns out that the works there were just bad reproductions of our originals.

    I, of course, take great pride in keeping the lawn manicured, the floors polished and the exhibits impeccably preserved. Dust doesn't settle here. Careful lighting and the latest technological advances ensure that the colors remain vivid and the images are as sharp as the day they were painted. Sadly though, I know that I cannot maintain this facility forever. That's why I'm training my daughter to one day take over as curator.




    Submitted on 2006-07-09 22:59:03     Terms of Service / Copyright Rules
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    ||| Comments |||
      Like Shana said, I also liked the sustained metaphor pertaining to this dysfunctional family of yours.

    Beneath the gilded pristine surface lies a lot of skeletons in the closet... all air-brushed over with painted plastic smiles and see-through veneers.

    The Jones family was a nice touch-- I got the feeling of smug superiority and a tinge of jealousy when you mentioned them.

    This piece is all about appearances... what is portrayed and what reallly lurks beneath all the artistry.

    Interesting piece... and a great perspective to write from.
    Peace,

    Jase
    | Posted on 2006-07-09 00:00:00 | by alteredlife | [ Reply to This ]
      I like this a lot. Probably most family museums would be like this or something similar (mine would look like a Rube Goldberg). You do a good job with 'picturing' each member of your family. I'm just wondering what yours would look like. This seems incomplete without it. I also like your obsession with keeping the place up. Nice work.

    Peace,

    Joe
    | Posted on 2006-07-10 00:00:00 | by joeyalphabet | [ Reply to This ]
      Welcome to the Smith Museum. Tours begin every fifteen minutes, three-hundred sixty-five days a year. Admission is free.

    This portrait is my mother.
    Plastic smile above the shoulders,
    But below, the fists and knees are clenched.

    This painting portrays my father.
    He's right there in that empty spot.
    He's a little hard to see, but you know he's there because of the kid crying in the foreground.

    My sister was the inspiration for this sculpture. Perfectly proportioned, with a smooth, flawless surface. But don't touch her.
    She's all crumbly underneath.

    My brother is in the water fountain, at the end of the hall right outside the restrooms. He loses a little pressure when they flush.

    I do all the framework myself, as the frames are so crucial to keeping the canvasses from becoming skewed and damaged. Sometimes it's the frame that makes the picture after all.

    We were hoping to acquire a new collection from the Jones Gallery across the street, but it turns out that the works there were just bad reproductions of our originals.

    I, of course, take great pride in keeping the lawn manicured, the floors polished and the exhibits impeccably preserved. Dust doesn't settle here. Careful lighting and the latest technological advances ensure that the colors remain vivid and the images are as sharp as the day they were painted. Sadly though, I know that I cannot maintain this facility forever. That's why I'm training my daughter to one day take over as curator.



    Yes, the frame does determine proportion and perspective (and is proudly mentioned as more perfect than the subject matter could possibly hope to duplicate). Is this, perhaps, an echo of the lone, 'normal' child's denial that the family skeletons have never made their way to her closet? And will this same, perfect vision be imbedded in the psyche of her daughter ("I'm not insane but my family's crazy."). Just a thought.


    I'm certain every 'museum' has at least one room like this.

    Take care.
    Bill.
    | Posted on 2006-07-09 00:00:00 | by rws | [ Reply to This ]
      Hi.. I'm mk and I'm new here.
    I really really like this. It is refreshing and original. The message is so bleak though. There are definitely different ways you could go with this.. you could have made it a little more neutral instead of so depressing.. and it might have made it more interesting.

    I love just the idea of this!

    mk
    | Posted on 2006-07-10 00:00:00 | by mk666 | [ Reply to This ]
      Hey! Do we have the same family??? Quite certain I've seen my mother take that stance! LOL!
    Excellent portraits...you've done well painting these pictures in my own mind. Love the tour...any chance I could fill out a job application...or perhaps I might consign a room to add my own dysfunctional collection...I have a lot of blank canvas work...but, if you look long enough at them, you may perhaps see some "illusions that aren't really there!"
    Love your sense of humor!
    Kimmy
    | Posted on 2006-07-10 00:00:00 | by KimmyMim | [ Reply to This ]
      Sad. I dunno what to say.

    It rings very true, though. What we see isn't always what we get. People do such a great job of disguising the bad quality of the 'artwork' (family) by guilding its framework and surroundings. The 'nicest' homes, are not necessarily the best.

    I love the sustained metaphor, it's a very astute one. The fractured way of writing also adds to the sense that this is a dysfunctional, fractured family. You look into every aspect and feature of a dysfunctional household, with such subtle insight that it is, sadly enough, a pleasure to read.

    Only one critique, though, and that's in the last paragraph, it should be 'ensure' and not 'insure.' Otherwise, it's all fine.

    Shana.
    | Posted on 2006-07-09 00:00:00 | by shana | [ Reply to This ]
      Hey Annie,

    Lovely piece. I'm becoming a fan of yours. I enjoyed reading your work so far. It's very original and has a lot of tastes to it. You create such a strong impression of what goes on in your house and cover it up as a museum....a bad one which is kinda how i would look at my household. We're open all year long and we all have parts of the house and characteristics which makes the household special as well as like everyone else.

    I love the first six stanzas. Very descriptive and refreshing. especially the brother part. If i had a brother, i'd probably put him somewhere close to the bathroom if not the bathroom itself.

    The last couple of lines were necessary but not as intriguing as the first six. I guess the first part was kinda fun to read. The rest became a bit more serious. I don't know maybe it was the effect that you wanted to bring. In any way, you still did something great out of this. I liked it very much.

    I hope to see more from you soon. Do take care...

    ~Irina
    | Posted on 2006-07-11 00:00:00 | by charmedidentity | [ Reply to This ]


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