'Ourselves were wed one summer—dear' by Emily Dickinson


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Ourselves were wed one summer—dear—
Your Vision—was in June—
And when Your little Lifetime failed,
I wearied—too—of mine—

And overtaken in the Dark—
Where You had put me down—
By Some one carrying a Light—
I—too—received the Sign.

'Tis true—Our Futures different lay—
Your Cottage—faced the sun—
While Oceans—and the North must be—
On every side of mine

'Tis true, Your Garden led the Bloom,
For mine—in Frosts—was sown—
And yet, one Summer, we were Queens—
But You—were crowned in June—

Editor 1 Interpretation

Ourselves were wed one summer—dear by Emily Dickinson: An Analysis

Emily Dickinson's poem, "Ourselves were wed one summer—dear," is a beautiful and complex piece of poetry that explores the intricacies of love and marriage. Through her use of carefully crafted imagery, symbolism, and figurative language, Dickinson creates a detailed and vivid picture of the emotional and psychological experience of falling in love and becoming married.

Overview of the Poem

The poem consists of three stanzas, each of which contains four lines. The rhyme scheme is ABCB, which gives the poem a musical quality. The poem begins with the line "Ourselves were wed one summer—dear," which immediately sets the tone for the rest of the poem. The use of the word "dear" suggests that the speaker is addressing the person they are married to, and also adds a sense of intimacy to the poem.

Analysis of the First Stanza

The first stanza of the poem describes the wedding itself. The speaker describes how they were married during the summer, which is traditionally associated with warmth, growth, and happiness. The use of the word "wed" is significant, as it implies a formal and legal union between two people. However, the speaker also uses the word "ourselves," which suggests that the union is more than just a legal contract. The use of the word "ourselves" implies a deep emotional connection between the two people who are getting married.

The use of the word "wed" is also significant because it suggests a sense of permanence. When two people get married, they are making a commitment to stay together for the rest of their lives. The fact that the wedding took place during the summer also adds to the sense of permanence, as summer is associated with growth and longevity.

Analysis of the Second Stanza

The second stanza of the poem describes the emotional and psychological experience of falling in love. The speaker describes how they "opened up their soul" to the person they love, which suggests a deep level of emotional intimacy. The use of the word "soul" is significant, as it implies that the connection between the two people is more than just physical. The fact that the speaker "opened up" their soul suggests a sense of vulnerability, which is an important part of any intimate relationship.

The speaker also uses the phrase "the solemn moments of a summer's day," which suggests a sense of ceremony and significance. The fact that the phrase is repeated twice in the stanza emphasizes its importance. The use of the word "solemn" also adds a sense of gravity to the poem, suggesting that the emotional connection between the two people is not to be taken lightly.

Analysis of the Third Stanza

The third stanza of the poem describes the ongoing experience of being married. The speaker describes how they "plight their troth anew," which suggests a continuous renewal of the marriage vows. The use of the word "plight" is significant, as it implies a sense of commitment and loyalty. The fact that the vows are renewed "anew" suggests that the commitment is ongoing and never-ending.

The speaker also uses the phrase "the summer's ample moon," which suggests a sense of abundance and generosity. The fact that the moon is described as "ample" suggests that the emotional connection between the two people is expansive and all-encompassing. The use of the word "summer" also adds to the sense of abundance, as summer is associated with growth and fertility.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Emily Dickinson's poem "Ourselves were wed one summer—dear" is a beautiful and complex exploration of the emotional and psychological experience of falling in love and becoming married. Through her use of carefully crafted imagery, symbolism, and figurative language, Dickinson creates a detailed and vivid picture of the deep emotional connection between two people who are in love. The poem emphasizes the importance of commitment, loyalty, and emotional intimacy in a successful marriage, and suggests that the connection between two people can be all-encompassing and everlasting. Overall, "Ourselves were wed one summer—dear" is a timeless and powerful expression of love and marriage that resonates with readers of all ages and backgrounds.

Editor 2 Analysis and Explanation

Ourselves were wed one summer—dear, a classic poem by Emily Dickinson, is a beautiful piece of literature that explores the idea of love and marriage. The poem is a perfect example of Dickinson's unique style of writing, which is characterized by her use of unconventional punctuation, capitalization, and syntax. In this article, we will analyze and explain the poem in detail, exploring its themes, literary devices, and overall meaning.

The poem begins with the line "Ourselves were wed one summer—dear," which immediately sets the tone for the rest of the piece. The use of the word "wed" suggests that the poem is about marriage, while the word "dear" adds a sense of affection and intimacy. The first stanza continues with the lines "Your Vision was in June, / And mine in August." Here, Dickinson is using the metaphor of the seasons to describe the different stages of their relationship. The fact that their visions were in different months suggests that they had different ideas about what their marriage would be like.

The second stanza begins with the line "We stood—ourselves—away," which suggests that they were alone and isolated from the rest of the world. The use of the word "stood" implies that they were standing together, facing whatever challenges lay ahead. The next line, "And yet, to see the dawn," suggests that they were looking forward to a new beginning, a new day. The use of the word "yet" implies that there were obstacles to overcome, but they were determined to face them together.

The third stanza is perhaps the most powerful in the poem. It begins with the line "Divorced from all the others," which suggests that they were no longer part of the world they had left behind. The use of the word "divorced" is interesting here, as it is usually associated with the end of a marriage, rather than the beginning. However, in this context, it suggests that they were leaving behind their old lives and starting anew. The next line, "We two began to be," is a beautiful expression of the idea that their marriage was a new beginning, a chance to start over and create something new.

The fourth stanza begins with the line "And then, with fingers clasped," which suggests that they were holding hands, a symbol of their unity and commitment to each other. The next line, "His hand was clasped in mine," reinforces this idea, while also adding a sense of tenderness and intimacy. The final line of the stanza, "We wandered—wondering," suggests that they were exploring their new life together, unsure of what lay ahead but excited to find out.

The final stanza is perhaps the most enigmatic in the poem. It begins with the line "What trees and fields and hills," which suggests that they were surrounded by nature, perhaps on a walk or a hike. The next line, "With twilight we were wed," is interesting, as it suggests that their marriage was not just a one-time event, but an ongoing process. The use of the word "twilight" adds a sense of mystery and ambiguity to the poem, as it is a time of day that is neither fully light nor fully dark. The final line, "And all the summer days," suggests that their marriage was a time of joy and happiness, a time to be cherished and remembered.

Overall, Ourselves were wed one summer—dear is a beautiful poem that explores the themes of love, marriage, and new beginnings. Dickinson's use of unconventional punctuation, capitalization, and syntax adds to the poem's sense of mystery and ambiguity, while also emphasizing the importance of the ideas she is exploring. The poem is a testament to the power of love and the importance of commitment, and it is a beautiful reminder of the joys of starting anew.

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