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Metaphors Analysis



Author: poem of Sylvia Plath Type: poem Views: 54


I'm a riddle in nine syllables,
An elephant, a ponderous house,
A melon strolling on two tendrils.
O red fruit, ivory, fine timbers!
This loaf's big with its yeasty rising.
Money's new-minted in this fat purse.
I'm a means, a stage, a cow in calf.
I've eaten a bag of green apples,
Boarded the train there's no getting off.


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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




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Metaphors :.
Sylvia Plath\'s poem \"Metaphors\" is a true example of her minx-like trickery of words. The poem\'s, consisting of nine lines each containing nine syllables, is actually a riddle, which is revealed in the first line. Through images and descriptions she alludes to her state during it\'s composition- pregnancy. The poem\'s simple and apt title, \"Metaphors,\" is uniquely appropriate because that\'s exactly what each line is.
The reader is intended to hear a collection of clues, starting in the second line. Plath describes herself firstly with visual metaphors. Elephants and ponderous houses both conjure images of things that are large and bulky, as she feels in her pregnant body. And when reading the third line you can easily picture a pregnant lady\'s round belly and thin legs as a melon strolling on two tendrils.
The fourth line begins the phase of the poem that describes her in metaphors of fertility. Red fruit is a biblical allusion to \"fruit of thy womb\" and clearly relates to having a child. Ivory and fine timbers are both housing metaphors, meaning she is her child\'s home for the time being. The fifth line, the line about a rising loaf of dough, is an even more understandable metaphor, especially with the modern slang for being pregnant, having \"a bun in the oven.\"
The first six lines seem to be a celebration and playful description of pregnancy, but the poem definitely seems to take a turn at line seven. Plath describes herself as \"a means, a stage, a cow in calf,\" none of which seem to fit the bill for flattering or joyful in relation to pregnancy. All three seem to show indifference by Plath herself, as though it is a process she has very little control over or to do with. A means, as in she is just a way for a baby to be born, but does not feel very maternal. A stage, as though she is just a platform for a performance. And a cow in calf, where many cows are separated from their offspring and have little to do with the raising. The poem concludes darker still in lines eight and nine, \"I\'ve eaten a bag of green apples, Boarded the train there\'s no getting off.\" The bag of green apples could possibly be another biblical allusion, when Eve ate the apple with Adam and brought suffering on all women during childbirth. Plath also could have been referring to crabapples, which are small and green and make you very sick if you eat very many of them. The train Plath has boarded is the train of motherhood, which she clearly does not feel prepared for.
\"Metaphors\" is a very deeply personal poem from Plath\'s collection, one that foreshadowed her strained relationship with husband and two children before her eventual suicide in 1963.

| Posted on 2012-12-19 | by a guest


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The poem “Metaphors” is a lyric poem and Plath uses the metaphors in the poem to create a riddle as stated in line one. In the first line Plath sates that every line will have nine syllables made up of nine lines, this symbolizes nine months of pregnancy that she will carry her child to term. The second line compares her size of being pregnant to that of an elephant. It is significant that the speaker feels as if she is a “ponderous house” because she is the large living space for a fetus (2). Plath provides visual imagery in the third line by using a metaphor to convey that her legs feel small and feeble compared to her “melon” belly (3). The format of the poem is on three subjects broken into three lines each, which is symbolic for the poem is developed like pregnancy. There are three trimesters therefor there are three topics and three lines for each from out of the nine lines. The first three lines are about the speaker’s appearance.
The next three lines are about the baby and its growth inside of its mother. The fourth line, “O red fruit, ivory, fine timbers!” is a metaphor stating that the baby’s mother is its comfortable, known, and food-providing home (4).

| Posted on 2012-04-08 | by a guest


.: Metaphors :.

Sylvia Plath's poem "Metaphors" is a true example of her minx-like trickery of words. The poem's, consisting of nine lines each containing nine syllables, is actually a riddle, which is revealed in the first line. Through images and descriptions she alludes to her state during it's composition- pregnancy. The poem's simple and apt title, "Metaphors," is uniquely appropriate because that's exactly what each line is.
The reader is intended to hear a collection of clues, starting in the second line. Plath describes herself firstly with visual metaphors. Elephants and ponderous houses both conjure images of things that are large and bulky, as she feels in her pregnant body. And when reading the third line you can easily picture a pregnant lady's round belly and thin legs as a melon strolling on two tendrils.
The fourth line begins the phase of the poem that describes her in metaphors of fertility. Red fruit is a biblical allusion to "fruit of thy womb" and clearly relates to having a child. Ivory and fine timbers are both housing metaphors, meaning she is her child's home for the time being. The fifth line, the line about a rising loaf of dough, is an even more understandable metaphor, especially with the modern slang for being pregnant, having "a bun in the oven."
The first six lines seem to be a celebration and playful description of pregnancy, but the poem definitely seems to take a turn at line seven. Plath describes herself as "a means, a stage, a cow in calf," none of which seem to fit the bill for flattering or joyful in relation to pregnancy. All three seem to show indifference by Plath herself, as though it is a process she has very little control over or to do with. A means, as in she is just a way for a baby to be born, but does not feel very maternal. A stage, as though she is just a platform for a performance. And a cow in calf, where many cows are separated from their offspring and have little to do with the raising. The poem concludes darker still in lines eight and nine, "I've eaten a bag of green apples, Boarded the train there's no getting off." The bag of green apples could possibly be another biblical allusion, when Eve ate the apple with Adam and brought suffering on all women during childbirth. Plath also could have been referring to crabapples, which are small and green and make you very sick if you eat very many of them. The train Plath has boarded is the train of motherhood, which she clearly does not feel prepared for.
"Metaphors" is a very deeply personal poem from Plath's collection, one that foreshadowed her strained relationship with husband and two children before her eventual suicide in 1963.

| Posted on 2008-04-24 | by a guest


.: :.

I'm a riddle in nine syllables,
An elephant, a ponderous house,
A melon strolling on two tendrils.
O red fruit, ivory, fine timbers!
This loaf's big with its yeasty rising.
Money's new-minted in this fat purse.
I'm a means, a stage, a cow in calf.
I've eaten a bag of green apples,
Boarded the train there's no getting off.

| Posted on 2007-03-22 | by a guest




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