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The Cask Of Amontillado Analysis



Author: Prose of Edgar Allen Poe Type: Prose Views: 15148

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THE thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as I best could, but when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge. You, who so well know the nature of my soul, will not suppose, however, that gave utterance to a threat. At length I would be avenged; this was a point definitely, settled --but the very definitiveness with which it was resolved precluded the idea of risk. I must not only punish but punish with impunity. A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser. It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong.
It must be understood that neither by word nor deed had I given Fortunato cause to doubt my good will. I continued, as was my in to smile in his face, and he did not perceive that my to smile now was at the thought of his immolation.
He had a weak point --this Fortunato --although in other regards he was a man to be respected and even feared. He prided himself on his connoisseurship in wine. Few Italians have the true virtuoso spirit. For the most part their enthusiasm is adopted to suit the time and opportunity, to practise imposture upon the British and Austrian millionaires. In painting and gemmary, Fortunato, like his countrymen, was a quack, but in the matter of old wines he was sincere. In this respect I did not differ from him materially; --I was skilful in the Italian vintages myself, and bought largely whenever I could.
It was about dusk, one evening during the supreme madness of the carnival season, that I encountered my friend. He accosted me with excessive warmth, for he had been drinking much. The man wore motley. He had on a tight-fitting parti-striped dress, and his head was surmounted by the conical cap and bells. I was so pleased to see him that I thought I should never have done wringing his hand.
I said to him --"My dear Fortunato, you are luckily met. How remarkably well you are looking to-day. But I have received a pipe of what passes for Amontillado, and I have my doubts."
"How?" said he. "Amontillado, A pipe? Impossible! And in the middle of the carnival!"
"I have my doubts," I replied; "and I was silly enough to pay the full Amontillado price without consulting you in the matter. You were not to be found, and I was fearful of losing a bargain."
"Amontillado!"
"I have my doubts."
"Amontillado!"
"And I must satisfy them."
"Amontillado!"
"As you are engaged, I am on my way to Luchresi. If any one has a critical turn it is he. He will tell me --"
"Luchresi cannot tell Amontillado from Sherry."
"And yet some fools will have it that his taste is a match for your own.
"Come, let us go."
"Whither?"
"To your vaults."
"My friend, no; I will not impose upon your good nature. I perceive you have an engagement. Luchresi--"
"I have no engagement; --come."
"My friend, no. It is not the engagement, but the severe cold with which I perceive you are afflicted. The vaults are insufferably damp. They are encrusted with nitre."
"Let us go, nevertheless. The cold is merely nothing. Amontillado! You have been imposed upon. And as for Luchresi, he cannot distinguish Sherry from Amontillado."
Thus speaking, Fortunato possessed himself of my arm; and putting on a mask of black silk and drawing a roquelaire closely about my person, I suffered him to hurry me to my palazzo.
There were no attendants at home; they had absconded to make merry in honour of the time. I had told them that I should not return until the morning, and had given them explicit orders not to stir from the house. These orders were sufficient, I well knew, to insure their immediate disappearance, one and all, as soon as my back was turned.
I took from their sconces two flambeaux, and giving one to Fortunato, bowed him through several suites of rooms to the archway that led into the vaults. I passed down a long and winding staircase, requesting him to be cautious as he followed. We came at length to the foot of the descent, and stood together upon the damp ground of the catacombs of the Montresors.
The gait of my friend was unsteady, and the bells upon his cap jingled as he strode.
"The pipe," he said.
"It is farther on," said I; "but observe the white web-work which gleams from these cavern walls."
He turned towards me, and looked into my eves with two filmy orbs that distilled the rheum of intoxication.
"Nitre?" he asked, at length.
"Nitre," I replied. "How long have you had that cough?"
"Ugh! ugh! ugh! --ugh! ugh! ugh! --ugh! ugh! ugh! --ugh! ugh! ugh! --ugh! ugh! ugh!"
My poor friend found it impossible to reply for many minutes.
"It is nothing," he said, at last.
"Come," I said, with decision, "we will go back; your health is precious. You are rich, respected, admired, beloved; you are happy, as once I was. You are a man to be missed. For me it is no matter. We will go back; you will be ill, and I cannot be responsible. Besides, there is Luchresi --"
"Enough," he said; "the cough's a mere nothing; it will not kill me. I shall not die of a cough."
"True --true," I replied; "and, indeed, I had no intention of alarming you unnecessarily --but you should use all proper caution. A draught of this Medoc will defend us from the damps.
Here I knocked off the neck of a bottle which I drew from a long row of its fellows that lay upon the mould.
"Drink," I said, presenting him the wine.
He raised it to his lips with a leer. He paused and nodded to me familiarly, while his bells jingled.
"I drink," he said, "to the buried that repose around us."
"And I to your long life."
He again took my arm, and we proceeded.
"These vaults," he said, "are extensive."
"The Montresors," I replied, "were a great and numerous family."
"I forget your arms."
"A huge human foot d'or, in a field azure; the foot crushes a serpent rampant whose fangs are imbedded in the heel."
"And the motto?"
"Nemo me impune lacessit."
"Good!" he said.
The wine sparkled in his eyes and the bells jingled. My own fancy grew warm with the Medoc. We had passed through long walls of piled skeletons, with casks and puncheons intermingling, into the inmost recesses of the catacombs. I paused again, and this time I made bold to seize Fortunato by an arm above the elbow.
"The nitre!" I said; "see, it increases. It hangs like moss upon the vaults. We are below the river's bed. The drops of moisture trickle among the bones. Come, we will go back ere it is too late. Your cough --"
"It is nothing," he said; "let us go on. But first, another draught of the Medoc."
I broke and reached him a flagon of De Grave. He emptied it at a breath. His eyes flashed with a fierce light. He laughed and threw the bottle upwards with a gesticulation I did not understand.
I looked at him in surprise. He repeated the movement --a grotesque one.
"You do not comprehend?" he said.
"Not I," I replied.
"Then you are not of the brotherhood."
"How?"
"You are not of the masons."
"Yes, yes," I said; "yes, yes."
"You? Impossible! A mason?"
"A mason," I replied.
"A sign," he said, "a sign."
"It is this," I answered, producing from beneath the folds of my roquelaire a trowel.
"You jest," he exclaimed, recoiling a few paces. "But let us proceed to the Amontillado."
"Be it so," I said, replacing the tool beneath the cloak and again offering him my arm. He leaned upon it heavily. We continued our route in search of the Amontillado. We passed through a range of low arches, descended, passed on, and descending again, arrived at a deep crypt, in which the foulness of the air caused our flambeaux rather to glow than flame.
At the most remote end of the crypt there appeared another less spacious. Its walls had been lined with human remains, piled to the vault overhead, in the fashion of the great catacombs of Paris. Three sides of this interior crypt were still ornamented in this manner. From the fourth side the bones had been thrown down, and lay promiscuously upon the earth, forming at one point a mound of some size. Within the wall thus exposed by the displacing of the bones, we perceived a still interior crypt or recess, in depth about four feet, in width three, in height six or seven. It seemed to have been constructed for no especial use within itself, but formed merely the interval between two of the colossal supports of the roof of the catacombs, and was backed by one of their circumscribing walls of solid granite.
It was in vain that Fortunato, uplifting his dull torch, endeavoured to pry into the depth of the recess. Its termination the feeble light did not enable us to see.
"Proceed," I said; "herein is the Amontillado. As for Luchresi --"
"He is an ignoramus," interrupted my friend, as he stepped unsteadily forward, while I followed immediately at his heels. In niche, and finding an instant he had reached the extremity of the niche, and finding his progress arrested by the rock, stood stupidly bewildered. A moment more and I had fettered him to the granite. In its surface were two iron staples, distant from each other about two feet, horizontally. From one of these depended a short chain, from the other a padlock. Throwing the links about his waist, it was but the work of a few seconds to secure it. He was too much astounded to resist. Withdrawing the key I stepped back from the recess.
"Pass your hand," I said, "over the wall; you cannot help feeling the nitre. Indeed, it is very damp. Once more let me implore you to return. No? Then I must positively leave you. But I must first render you all the little attentions in my power."
"The Amontillado!" ejaculated my friend, not yet recovered from his astonishment.
"True," I replied; "the Amontillado."
As I said these words I busied myself among the pile of bones of which I have before spoken. Throwing them aside, I soon uncovered a quantity of building stone and mortar. With these materials and with the aid of my trowel, I began vigorously to wall up the entrance of the niche.
I had scarcely laid the first tier of the masonry when I discovered that the intoxication of Fortunato had in a great measure worn off. The earliest indication I had of this was a low moaning cry from the depth of the recess. It was not the cry of a drunken man. There was then a long and obstinate silence. I laid the second tier, and the third, and the fourth; and then I heard the furious vibrations of the chain. The noise lasted for several minutes, during which, that I might hearken to it with the more satisfaction, I ceased my labours and sat down upon the bones. When at last the clanking subsided, I resumed the trowel, and finished without interruption the fifth, the sixth, and the seventh tier. The wall was now nearly upon a level with my breast. I again paused, and holding the flambeaux over the mason-work, threw a few feeble rays upon the figure within.
A succession of loud and shrill screams, bursting suddenly from the throat of the chained form, seemed to thrust me violently back. For a brief moment I hesitated, I trembled. Unsheathing my rapier, I began to grope with it about the recess; but the thought of an instant reassured me. I placed my hand upon the solid fabric of the catacombs, and felt satisfied. I reapproached the wall; I replied to the yells of him who clamoured. I re-echoed, I aided, I surpassed them in volume and in strength. I did this, and the clamourer grew still.
It was now midnight, and my task was drawing to a close. I had completed the eighth, the ninth and the tenth tier. I had finished a portion of the last and the eleventh; there remained but a single stone to be fitted and plastered in. I struggled with its weight; I placed it partially in its destined position. But now there came from out the niche a low laugh that erected the hairs upon my head. It was succeeded by a sad voice, which I had difficulty in recognizing as that of the noble Fortunato. The voice said--
"Ha! ha! ha! --he! he! he! --a very good joke, indeed --an excellent jest. We will have many a rich laugh about it at the palazzo --he! he! he! --over our wine --he! he! he!"
"The Amontillado!" I said.
"He! he! he! --he! he! he! --yes, the Amontillado. But is it not getting late? Will not they be awaiting us at the palazzo, the Lady Fortunato and the rest? Let us be gone."
"Yes," I said, "let us be gone."
"For the love of God, Montresor!"
"Yes," I said, "for the love of God!"
But to these words I hearkened in vain for a reply. I grew impatient. I called aloud --
"Fortunato!"
No answer. I called again --
"Fortunato!"
No answer still. I thrust a torch through the remaining aperture and let it fall within. There came forth in return only a jingling of the bells. My heart grew sick; it was the dampness of the catacombs that made it so. I hastened to make an end of my labour. I forced the last stone into its position; I plastered it up. Against the new masonry I re-erected the old rampart of bones. For the half of a century no mortal has disturbed them. In pace requiescat!





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Im in 7th grade, 3rd qtr, honors class. my teach wants me to figure out wat the qote "I would be avenged; this was a point definitely, settled --but the very definitiveness with which it was resolved precluded the idea of risk. I must not only punish but punish with impunity. A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser. It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong." means in 5 sentences any ideas.

| Posted on 2015-02-03 | by a guest


.: :.

Im in 7th grade, 3rd qtr, honors class. my teach wants me to figure out wat the qote "I would be avenged; this was a point definitely, settled --but the very definitiveness with which it was resolved precluded the idea of risk. I must not only punish but punish with impunity. A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser. It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong." means in 5 sentences any ideas.

| Posted on 2015-02-03 | by a guest


.: :.

This Is A Really Good Story But I Do Say Alot Of Thought Went In To It.

| Posted on 2011-11-07 | by a guest


.: :.

This Is A Really Good Story But I Do Say Alot Of Thought Went In To It.

| Posted on 2011-11-07 | by a guest


.: :.

In regards to my last post, these are the questions we get to answer-
CASK OF AMONTILLADO QUESTIONS


1. Descrbe the setting of the story.

2. Why does Montresor want revenge?

3. List 5 adjectives to describe x _

4. What does Fortunato’s name mean?

5. Why is Fortunato’s name IRONIC?

6. List 5 adjectives to describe x _

7. Contrast the setting in the beginning of the story with the setting where Montressor takes Fortunato. How do these settings contribute to the horror of the story?

8. Who is the narrator of this story? Is he reliable? Why or why not?

9. What do the following symbolize:
The carnival setting _
The descent into the catacombs _
The jester costume _

10. What is the meaning of the phrase “A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser”?

11. How did Montresor know that the house would be empty?

12. Describe the catacombs.

13. Why does Montresor make sure Fortunato has drunk a lot of wine?

14. Who is Luchesi? For what purpose does he serve?

15. Why does Montresor show concern for Fortunato’s health?
16. Why do you think Montresor succeeded in leading Fortunato to the niche without raising his suspicions?

17. Where had the stone and morter, used by Montresor to wall up the entrance to the niche, been hidden?
18. Why do you think Fortunato became silent at the end?

19. How did this effect Montresor?
20. Do you believe insults or bullying could cause this degree of revenge today? Give an example to support your assertion.

21. Explain how Montressor’s family motto is related to the story.

22. How does not knowing what Fortunato did to Montressor add to the story’s suspense?

| Posted on 2011-10-23 | by a guest


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Uh, high school? I have to read this for 7th grade honors. And we have to answer these questions- x

| Posted on 2011-10-23 | by a guest


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I just want to make a note to everyone who says this story is difficult to read.
It IS difficult to read, especially if English isn\'t your primary language. Poe wrote this story for the educated adults of his day. Adults who would understand the Latin used in it and get the sly jokes on the names of the wines.
The fact that this story is taught in high school speaks to how effectively Poe wrote. His writing can be challenging, but it is always clearly plotted and expertly edited. Remember that he was a poet first and a writer second. His short stories are written with the efficiency of poetry.

| Posted on 2011-10-01 | by a guest


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this story is very interesting.it talks about the love to his family.sometimes there is a lot of words i cannot understand....but at the end i can...

| Posted on 2011-07-31 | by a guest


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I Have read it twice and I found it really difficult to comprehend. The first reading was global but the second one was more detailed. I had to look a lot of words that I didn`t understand but it was very useful to understand iu at last!!!

| Posted on 2011-05-21 | by a guest


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confusing to read hate the way he writes Montressor has problems

| Posted on 2011-04-06 | by a guest


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English is not my first language, i tried to read this short story for test. I found it difficult to understand because the structure of the sentences and vocabularies used are different-not plain english.

| Posted on 2011-02-23 | by a guest


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THE FIRST TIME I READ THIS STORY I ADMIT I REALLY DON\'T UNDERSTAND BUT WHEN I RE-READ IT AND KNEW THE MEANING OF THE OLD ENGLISH TERMS I WAS INTRIGUED TO THE STORY AND I REALLY READ IT CLOSELY.I FOUND IT INTERESTING AND QUITE CONFUSING.
FOR THOSE WHO REALLY DON\'T UNDERSTAND THE STORY TRY TO LOOK FOR THE WORDS IN TO A DICTIONARY SO THAT YOU WOULD COULD GET IF WHAT HAPPENED TO THE WHOLE STORY.
IT IS FUN TRY TO RE-READ IT.
_LEE MARVZ_ SORACIM

| Posted on 2011-02-09 | by a guest


.: :.

THE FIRST TIME I READ THIS STORY I ADMIT I REALLY DON\'T UNDERSTAND BUT WHEN I RE-READ IT AND KNEW THE MEANING OF THE OLD ENGLISH TERMS I WAS INTRIGUED TO THE STORY AND I REALLY READ IT CLOSELY.I FOUND IT INTERESTING AND QUITE CONFUSING.
FOR THOSE WHO REALLY DON\'T UNDERSTAND THE STORY TRY TO LOOK FOR THE WORDS IN TO A DICTIONARY SO THAT YOU WOULD COULD GET IF WHAT HAPPENED TO THE WHOLE STORY.
IT IS FUN TRY TO RE-READ IT.
_LEE MARVZ_ SORACIM

| Posted on 2011-02-09 | by a guest


.: :.

Montresor is a psycho, remember that. Whatever wrong Fortunado has done to him is so minuscule that fortunado himself does not even remember. Montresor lures fortunado with the promise of a cask of wine, Amontillado. Montresor leads him into a room in his catacombs (where they keep wine and dead bodies underground) and chains him in a niche in the wall. Montresor walls him in brick by brick and is never caught for his murder nor is Fortunado found for another 50 years. Get it? I had to study this for 2 weeks so I understand all of it.

| Posted on 2010-11-07 | by a guest


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what does amontillado mean in the part where they are like \"Amontillado\"
\"I have my doubts\" \"Amontillado\"\"and i must satisfy them\" amontillado\"

| Posted on 2010-10-13 | by a guest


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I don\'t get this story can someone explain the summary and the themes to me.

| Posted on 2010-10-03 | by a guest


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As far as i percieve, Fortunato was walled in and died and montreseur was never caught

| Posted on 2010-05-18 | by a guest


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I'm in 8th grade and the only part I go t at first was that Montresor led Fortunato into the catacombs because of some kind of wine...After reading these comments I understand so much better! Thx guys :)

| Posted on 2010-04-12 | by a guest


.: :.

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the names of the wines noted throughout the story and their possible symbolism. for example, "medoc" for fortunato so he can fend off the cold and "de grave" while he is walking to his own grave. deeper interpretations would be much appreciated. also, what does the repetition of the bells jingling on fortunato's head symbolize?

| Posted on 2010-04-11 | by a guest


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Montresor does not repent of his actions. "In pace requiescat!" which he said at the end of the story, means "rest in peace!"

| Posted on 2010-04-06 | by a guest


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All in all this story was great. It is the basic foundation of human nature, to get even. All Mostresor wanted his revenge for whatever reason. However what I think was highly ironic is that Montresor says that Fortunado is a highly respected man and loved by all but after 50 years no one found his body. No one really attempt to look for him because if he did most likely they wouldve found it. Well that's my opinion, yet I don't understand the whole part about being a mason.*** And by the by I am not gonna brag about being a highschooler and understanding this story perfectly. that's just not me***

| Posted on 2010-03-10 | by a guest


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I first read this as an 18-yr old freshman at Queens College in 1976. I just re-read it now at 51 yrs old in 2010. What is the 'insult?' Probably not even important; perhaps a literary trick. This is just a story, from a master. All literature, like all songwriting, like all painting, i guess like all art, comes from somewhere, or somewhere within. It may or may not be autobiographical or metaphorical or rooted in anything real in the artist's life. But it may. That is the fun of it. This is why we think about it and discuss it. I like the 9th grader's comments (2009-09-28, by a guest). You can imagine the motive to be what you want it to be. Whatever the meaning, we all sit on the edge of our chair reading it. Because the author played with plot, story structure and dialog. Hail Poe! A true American treasure. If you are an aspiring writer read more of this guy. And T.S. Eliot. And Counting Crows...
George

| Posted on 2010-02-26 | by a guest


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"Nemo me impune lacessit", Latin meaning no one assails me with impunity. In this one line Poe characterizes The Cask of Amontillado. It is a story of the perfect revenge and why it is unattainable. The main character, Montresor, executes a plan, which he hopes will "punish [Fortunato, the wrongdoer,] with impunity". The short story discloses that the act of revenge is not successful if "retribution overtakes its redresser" and if "the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong". This story revolves around those requirements.

| Posted on 2009-11-05 | by a guest


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like the story in real life u shudnt make fun of someone or there are concequences.

| Posted on 2009-10-27 | by a guest


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This story was interesting to me, there is a lot of insight gained upon the author and his own issues deep within. Although the first time I read it I admit I was confused, the dialect is different when you haven't read much literature. I say, if you don't fully understand, research themes and literary devices and you really get a good idea of what is actually going on. It is really sad that some people would say negative things about people that are just trying to learn, that is pathetic. Think about it.

| Posted on 2009-10-22 | by a guest


.: :.

I think the insult against Montressor becomes obvious during the descent into the catacombs. Think about this: why does Montressor make constant allusion to the "nitre"? Nitre is potassium nitrate, or saltpetre. Saltpetre used to be put into prison food to make inmates less "agressive." Montressor's revenge is taken by, first of all, by adding to the effect of the wine, making Fortunato impotent and then sealing him inside the wall. Now do you know what the insult was?

| Posted on 2009-10-19 | by a guest


.: :.

This story is interesting, and I can't say that I don't find it gruesome and creepy. The way that Montressur actually enjoys the murder (until the end) and how he want's to draw out Fortunatoes pain (which he would have if Fortunato hadn't died from his cough)is interesting to me because not much writing is that detailed, and not many authors relish death and murder like Poe.
Why is it so hard to read? The story idea itself isn't hard- its the story of a murder. And there are only two characters. What's hard about it. On another note, I was reading a comment, and I loved the idea that a preist was blessing Montresseur- its unique and different. If that is the case, then Edgar Allen Poe is a truly brilliant man. (Ableit with a creepy mind)

| Posted on 2009-10-04 | by a guest


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I'm in 9th grade. This story has its twists and turns but it isn't that hard to figure out. If you are still confused think about this... Has it ever occured to you that something in Edgar allan poe's life may have spurned him to write this story? Like over critical people who then decided to insult his intelligence after critisizing him thousands of times? In my opinion Poe is dealing with some thing most high school stundents can relate to, Not being accepted because your different or think differently. fortunado is just a symbol for all the people who can't even fathom his thought processes and this story is what he wants to do. build a wall around all the people who won't leave him alone and never have to see them again.

| Posted on 2009-09-28 | by a guest


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what would have happened if Furtanado said yes lets go back when Montressor said do you want to go back

| Posted on 2009-09-23 | by a guest


.: :.

"Fortunato most likely never insulted Montresor. Montressor was jealous and overly sensitive. Fortunato considered him a friend and had no idea Montressor held a grudge against him. He was immediately glad to see his friend and readily went with him. Even if you had a big ego you wouldn't be so ready to help someone you had insulted a thousand times."
Hmmm...this may be a possible response, but the story is rather ambiguous anyway. Perhaps I will give my own rendition of the analysis.
Fortunato possibly DID insult Montresor. There are four possible reasons why Fortunato volunteered to check if it were really Amontillado.
1) He was drunk. This is evident from the fact that he constantly drank wine during the course of heading down the catacombs. He could possibly have been lightly intoxicated before entering, as explained in the next point.
2) The festival was going on and he was in high spirits. This explains why perhaps he had drunk before entering the crypt. He was simply was feeling joyeous.
3) He wanted to prove that he was better than Luchesi. If Luchesi had really shown that it was Amontillado, then all the credit for identifying the wine would go to him, whereas if he were to disproof (or prove again) the fact that the wine was Amontillado, then the credit would go to him instead.
4) He was, of course, tricked by Montresor. He put in much exaggeration and falsity into his 'speech' to egg Fortunado into entering the crypt or he would never be able to exact revenge.
Just my take on the short story. As I said the true meaning is ambiguous; Poe never wrote an analysis of it himself. ;P

| Posted on 2009-09-22 | by a guest


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I'm a 9th grader and i get a lot of it. :) and for people who dont understand it, maybe if you read it again you just might. DONT INSAL IF PEOPLE DIDNT UNDERSTAND! YOU NERDS WHO UNDERSTOOD IT!

| Posted on 2009-09-14 | by a guest


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if you dont understand this and your in high school its pretty sad..

| Posted on 2009-09-06 | by a guest


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how would the story have changed if montressor had met fortundo during the day instead of at dusk

| Posted on 2009-08-30 | by a guest


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Fortunato most likely never insulted Montressor. Montressor was jealous and overly sensitive. Fortunato considered him a friend and had no idea Montressor held a grudge against him. He was immediately glad to see his friend and readily went with him. Even if you had a big ego you wouldn't be so ready to help someone you had insulted a thousand times.

| Posted on 2009-07-28 | by a guest


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Please, give me the right answer,What is the ten stip?How Fortunato died? Thank you

| Posted on 2009-07-27 | by a guest


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i am a little bit confused especially on the structures of sentences. anyway, i hadn't had reread and analyze the story.

| Posted on 2009-07-23 | by a guest


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this story to someone who doesnt read often and isint a big fan of it is very confusing.this story explains the concept of revenge not always seen by the blind eye. does anyone else see it?
When is revenge justified? Or is revenge ever justified?

| Posted on 2009-07-06 | by a guest


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do you think montresor is in his right mind or an unbalanced person? plz help .. i have an essay!

| Posted on 2009-05-13 | by a guest


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Maybe, he didn't write the story for anybody. Maybe poe wrote it because it would make a good story. Not all stories need to have a reason why they were written

| Posted on 2009-01-22 | by a guest


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.: to the person that wrote "i dont think" :.
really? do you really think that it was just because of the temperature of the catacombs? he said that his heart grew sick -- that was probably his conscience, and he knows that. he is making the excuse that it is on account of the temperature of the catacombs, because one of the three rules of vengeance, according to montressor, is that the punisher must feel that the person has gotten what they deserve. if he feels guilty, then the entire act was meaningless to him. thus, he makes the excuse that he feels a chill in his heart because of the temperature.

| Posted on 2009-01-03 | by a guest




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