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The White Man's Burden Analysis



Author: Poetry of Rudyard Kipling Type: Poetry Views: 18765





Take up the White man's burden --

Send forth the best ye breed --

Go bind your sons to exile

To serve your captives' need;

To wait in heavy harness

On fluttered folk and wild --

Your new-caught, sullen peoples,

Half devil and half child.



Take up the White Man's burden --

In patience to abide,

To veil the threat of terror

And check the show of pride;

By open speech and simple,

An hundred times mad plain.

To seek another's profit,

And work another's gain.



Take up the White Man's burden --

The savage wars of peace --

Fill full the mouth of Famine

And bid the sickness cease;

And when your goal is nearest

The end for others sought,

Watch Sloth and heathen Folly

Bring all your hope to nought.



Take up the White Man's burden --

No tawdry rule of kings,

But toil of serf and sweeper --

The tale of common things.

The ports ye shall not enter,

The roads ye shall not tread,

Go make them with your living,

And mark them with your dead!



Take up the White man's burden --

And reap his old reward:

The blame of those ye better,

The hate of those ye guard --

The cry of hosts ye humour

(Ah, slowly!) toward the light: --

"Why brought ye us from bondage,

"Our loved Egyptian night?"



Take up the White Man's burden --

Ye dare not stoop to less --

Nor call too loud on freedom

To cloak your weariness;

By all ye cry or whisper,

By all ye leave or do,

The silent, sullen peoples

Shall weigh your Gods and you.



Take up the White Man's burden --

Have done with childish days --

The lightly proffered laurel,

The easy, ungrudged praise.

Comes now, to search your manhood

Through all the thankless years,

Cold-edged with dear-bought wisdom,

The judgment of your peers!





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

This poem is a satire. \'The arrogance of presuming that any people should take charge of the destiny of other people is at the heart of colonialism.\' Kipling intentionally made every line reek of arrogance and ultimate ironies for a purpose.
Kipling, an expatriate, became an editor of the British newspaper in Lahore when British domination of India was over a century old. His writings endured because of the way his inner consciousness rebelled against what he was a part of; it was his self-criticism that became noteworthy. His writings suggest that being any part of a colonial system demeans and drags a person down to depraved levels of behavior, just like a drug addiction.

| Posted on 2013-03-02 | by a guest


.: :.

This is not the work of an imperialist, but rather a warning of what Imperialism will bring, \"Take up the White man\'s burden --And reap his old reward:
The blame of those ye better,The hate of those ye guard\"
he was warning the Imperial powers that reaping the reward came with a price, and the price is to be blamed and hated, and so it has come to pass, Rudyard Kipling saw the future very clearly

| Posted on 2013-02-24 | by a guest


.: :.

Imperialsim is a thankless task, but there will be a reward for helpingthose uncivilized. He wants to show that if civilized, those previously uncivilized could work for the White Man and be beneficial. He\'s sohwing their captives, one by one becoming civilzed and the thrill that they are having a lasting effect on the society because it is the duty if the superior race to help the other races, not wuite caught up with us yet. He gave the image of enlightening those we capture by saying to bring them to the light. Wherever our government takes over it is ourresponibility to maintain order there. By doing this we will have enlightened them. To give Americans incentive to enlighten and bring civilization to an inferior race, and use their land for profit, he hints at the idea our peers will think bertter of us, and we may have a reward in heaven.

| Posted on 2013-02-22 | by a guest


.: :.

this is acutally NOT a satire. Rudyard kipling was pro-imperialist. He thought it was good that the White man would go to these colonies.

| Posted on 2012-12-16 | by a guest


.: :.

Even though most of everyone has already said this, The White Man\'s Burden is a poem about imperialism. The term \"The White Man\'s Burden\" refers to the \"burden\" or \"hardships\" that were placed onto the Americans because they had a duty to spread their huge advancement and better way of living with the rest of the world. From Rudyard Kipling\'s point of view, the \"white men\" have a very strong ideological mindset and think they are better than anyone else.

| Posted on 2012-05-03 | by a guest


.: :.

4th stanza:
\"No tawdy rule of the kings\"
(The white men cannot just go into the territory and go \"hey, I\'m your king, obey me!\", no, it does not work that way)
\"But toil of serf and sweeper\"
(To become king, you might as well giet down and dirty, hence the word \'toil\' indicating manual labor, \'serf ans sweeper\' as social status)
\"The tale of common things,
The ports ye shall not enter,
The roads ye shall not tread\"
(Most people of the Phillipines did not welcome the British and closed up their potrs and roads from them)
\"Go mark them with your living
Go mark them with your dead\"
(the British responded by starting a war as a way of forcing themselves into the phillipine territory)

| Posted on 2012-02-03 | by a guest


.: :.

.from this poem we can get an idea of the American (industrialized worlds) perspective of the unindustialized world and their role in it. There feeling of needing to spread there “better” way of life. The poem stresses a very Eurocentric view of the world in which non European nations are seen as demonic and childlick and need the help of developed nations to improve their culture and station in life by making them more westernized. There is a strong message that the rich nations have an oblication to help the poor wheather they want it or not.
Kipling sujeststhat there is no reward for carring the white mans burden but that is not so
It is important to look at this peom with a critical mind because what is said and what was done are very different. While some may truly have felt their dutiy to better the lives of those in the less developed nations many used the idea of spearding civilasaion as justification for talking over lands and exploiting the people and resourses for the betterment of the industrialized nation, not for the benefit of the “uncivilized”
It is important to note how this feeling of superiority and needing to spread civilization was not felt by all in America or throughout the industrialized world.

| Posted on 2011-11-19 | by a guest


.: :.

this peon jusitfies that white people are superior and they have a moral responsinilty to culture the orients. this also justifies that orients are inferior to oxidents.this thoery supports whites and show one side of the picture which is not true as is gives negative potrayal to orients.

| Posted on 2011-05-04 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is meant to be satirical. It says \"you\" to show that he is not one, but it seems as if everyone else thinks in this way, as if they are orders and that England is commanding everyone to think in this way. The repetition of the line \"take up the white man\'s burden\" shows that it is drilled into their heads over and over and they cannot escape from it.

| Posted on 2011-04-07 | by a guest


.: :.

Actually, this poem is a satire. He wrote it to show people what imperialism is really all about and to urge the United States to not join forces.

| Posted on 2011-03-18 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is about imperialism. Rudyard Kipling feels that it is the duty of \"the white man\" to civilize and industrialize less advanced people.

| Posted on 2011-03-11 | by a guest


.: :.

.: :.
Take up the White Man's burden--
Send forth the best ye breed--
Go, bind your sons to exile
To serve your captives' need;
To wait, in heavy harness,
On fluttered folk and wild--
Your new-caught sullen peoples,
Half devil and half child.

| Posted on 2010-12-02 | by a guest


.: :.

Take up the White man\'s burden --
Send forth the best ye breed --
Go bind your sons to exile
To serve your captives\' need;
To wait in heavy harness
On fluttered folk and wild --
Your new-caught, sullen peoples,
Half devil and half child.

| Posted on 2010-10-21 | by a guest


.: :.

Take up the White Man\'s burden--
Send forth the best ye breed--
Go, bind your sons to exile
To serve your captives\' need;
To wait, in heavy harness,
On fluttered folk and wild--
Your new-caught sullen peoples,
Half devil and half child. 

| Posted on 2010-08-27 | by a guest




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