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Song To Celia - II Analysis



Author: poem of Ben Jonson Type: poem Views: 34


Drink to me only with thine eyes,
   And I will pledge with mine;
Or leave a kiss but in the cup,
   And I'll not look for wine.
The thirst that from the soul doth rise
   Doth ask a drink divine;
But might I of Jove's nectar sup,
   I would not change for thine.

I sent thee late a rosy wreath,
   Not so much honouring thee
As giving it a hope, that there
   It could not withered be.
But thou thereon didst only breathe,
   And sent'st it back to me;
Since when it grows, and smells, I swear,
   Not of itself, but thee.

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




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This poem is about a man being madly in love with a woman and doing whatever it takes to get her to say yes to being with him. Jonson uses metaphoric language to describe his feelings at a different perspective.

| Posted on 2013-03-27 | by a guest


.: :.

it\'s so nice that the song to Celia is so wonderful.

| Posted on 2012-10-24 | by a guest


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Hope that all of us relates this story no matter what
happen we should never loosen up our hope for the one we
trully love . But we should respect their decision if we might not be our love.
@_aka_sandy23
ang mo react kay pn8t.joke lng.!

| Posted on 2012-10-23 | by a guest


.: :.

song to celia is a lyric poem wherein a man is very obsess to a woman.. what i can say is it is very lovable and touching poem because a man is doing everything to his love one in attain the sweet yes answer
@24

| Posted on 2012-09-21 | by a guest


.: :.

song to celia is a lyric poem wherein a man is very obsess to a woman.. what i can say is it is very lovable and touching poem because a man is doing everything to his love one in attain the sweet yes answer

| Posted on 2012-09-21 | by a guest


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According to my own analysis, billions of people all over the world receive the business loans from good creditors. Thence, there\'s good possibilities to receive a sba loan in every country.

| Posted on 2012-06-04 | by a guest


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poem song is description of natural beauty and poet is completely fell in love of his beloved

| Posted on 2012-04-02 | by a guest


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I WAS ADMIRED TO THE MAN WHO IS DEEPLY IN LOVE TO A WOMAN.

| Posted on 2011-11-22 | by a guest


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From my own personal point of view other than the ones whose understanding is better than mine, A Song to Celia is a poem that conveys none but an intense affection of a man to a woman whose name is Celia The author uses wine metaphorically to suggest that he is falling madly, deeply in love with Celia. Wine is used to compare his deep love with Celia suggesting the overall tone that when a man is heavily drank, the more the taste of the wine gets sweeter and sweeter until everything else unknowingly slipped away in a moment. Like love, its getting more intense day by day making it immeasurable through times Furthermore, the man in the poem exudes optimism, perseverance and persistence that he became courageous and bold with his feelings, though at the end Celia did not dare pay him attention at all (taking her sending the roses back to the courting man as a proof of dislike and distaste). The author even used Joves nectar to compare Celias sweetness as a woman but he says, he wont dare give in taking goddess sweetness over Celias...for the latter is incomparable and no other woman can equate the feelings that he has for her In the end the courting man found himself hopelessly devoted to Celia but he promised that his love will still grow eternally like the lovely roses that propagate and do not perish. (by recaphe)

| Posted on 2011-11-21 | by a guest


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hey guys,, i think this poem is so close to sixthenth poem.the lady acts just like she does in courtly love poetry.she is creul because she hurts the speaker whi
ch really loves her.and if it is not like 16thC. then she doesn\'t love the speaker because it is about love and i think we simply forgive the one we love.
Aneta kurdi

| Posted on 2011-05-19 | by a guest


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To Celia is a love poem with a simple four line rhyme scheme (abcbabcb), written in first person. The over all tone of the poem is dreamy, optimistic, persistent, and gullibly innocent. The rhythm is smooth, and pensive, and seems to fall into an iambic pentameter. The poem gives the reader an intimate sense of this man’s love, and obsession for the woman of his desire, Celia. I interpreted this poem as having a theme of lost love. I imagined that Celia is his ex-lover, he still is in love with her, and wants her to come back to him.
In the first stanza, the strong feelings he has for her are expressed metaphorically by comparing his love to drinking wine, and Jove’s Nectar, an elixir for immortality. He is intoxicated by her, and can’t live without her. In the first line “Drink to me, only with thine eyes And I will pledge with mine”, he is asking Celia to look at him with her eyes, and tell him she still loves him, he will in turn promise himself to her. “Or leave a kiss but in the cup And I\'ll not look for wine” meaning If that is too much to ask, at least show him in some way that she still cares for him, and that will as least satisfy him. “The thirst that from the soul doth rise Doth ask a drink divine”, the desire and love he has for her is burning deep inside of him, and he needs her. “But might I of Jove\'s nectar sup I would not change for thine”, meaning he cannot live without her. If he were given the gift of immortality, he would not take it just to be with her.
A wreath is a symbol of eternity, in the second stanza, he expresses eternal love for her by metaphorically comparing it to the rosy wreath. I believe the wreath also may represent an apology. In the first line of the second stanza, “I sent thee late a rosy wreath Not so much honoring thee”, I believe he is talking about the mistakes he made. He used the word late, implying that he was too late showing her his eternal love for her, and is now not able to have her, honoring being another word for having. “As giving it a hope that there It could not withered be”, he is telling her he loves her hoping their love is not lost. “But thou thereon didst only breath And sent\'st it back to me”, she doesn’t want to listen to him anymore, takes a deep breath or sigh, and does not accept his apology. “Since, when it grows and smells, I swear, Not of itself but thee”, No matter what happens, I will always love you, and a piece of you will always be with me.
Some techniques used in this poem are Alliteration, the use of metaphors, personification, irony, hyperbole, and possibly allegory. Alliteration can be identified in this poem by the words that are stressed such as (highlighted in green above) in the first stanza, stresses are placed on Drink, cup, kiss, and divine. Metaphors were used to describe his love for Celia, such as drinking the wine, the elixir of eternal life, and the rosy wreath. Personification is used in personifying Celia’s eyes, as if they could speak, and the thirst takes on a human quality of rising, and asking for a drink. I thought irony was present when Celia sent the wreath back, or denied his apology. The man disregarded this action, and continued with his protest of love for her. I think hyperbole was used a lot in this poem. For example the entire poem seems to be a hyperbole. It is extremely exaggerated, and in particular, the lines “But might I of Jove\'s nectar sup I would not change for thine”, and “Since, when it grows and smells, I swear, Not of itself but thee.” The images are unrealistic, and cannot be taken literally. I thought allegory can be identified in this poem, because if you read through the poem once, you may just interpret a man courting a woman, and the woman literally returning his gift to him, not acknowledging him. However I felt that these two people were at once very close. They loved each other, and the man did something that caused them to break up. He still is madly in love with her, and would do anything to get her back. He apologizes to her, but it is not enough. The literal meaning is obvious, but the symbolic meaning of the poets word choices lead to my interpretation. I believe three main important concepts that influence the entire poems message would be word choice, tone, and symbols.
Word choice is important in this poem, because the words used give the reader a detailed understanding of what the poet is trying to say. The words also create the imagery of the poem, and set up the meaning of the symbols used throughout. For example the whole first stanza is surrounded by words that are related to drinking wine, such as drink, cup, wine, thirst, and nectar. The words make it easy for the reader to determine that he is comparing the love he has for Celia to drinking wine, and the nectar of Jove’s. Her love is intoxicating, and worth more than anything to him. In the second stanza, the word choice I noticed was more important. The words late, rosy wreath, honouring, withered, breath, grows, smell, and swear, to me all had in depth meaning. For example late lead me to believe he had made a mistake. Rosy wreath suggested eternal love, and an apology. Honouring took on the meaning of having. Withered reminded me of dyeing, and lost love. Breath implied her presence, and disapproval. Grows, tells the reader that his love for her has only gotten stronger. Smell implies a sense of lingering, as if her essence is still all around him. Swear implies a promise to oneself, and he promises to always love her.
The tone of the poem I described as dreamy, optimistic, persistent, and gullibly innocent. I think this tone is important in getting the poets mood across to the reader. The rhythm of the poem contributes to the tone because it is smooth and pensive. The poem is read in a smooth whimsical way, and slightly imploring. I thought it was dreamy because of the flowery language used, and the whimsical way it read through. Optimistic because he is hopeful that Celia still loves him, persistent, because he goes into length describing his love, and gullibly innocent, because even though it is clear Celia wants nothing to do with him anymore, he still holds onto the love he has for her.
The symbols I thought were interesting, and really led me to discovering an underlying meaning to this poem. Examples of the symbol used in this poem are the eyes, Jove’s Nectar, the rosy wreath, and Celia’s breath. When the poet opens with mentioning thine eyes, it symbolizes that they are close, and he knows what she is feeling without her speaking. The eyes create intimacy in the poem. Jove’s Nectar symbolizes immortality, and his love. His love will never die for her. The rosy wreath symbolizes eternity, on how he will love her forever, and also I believe the wreath serves as a symbol for the apology he is giving her. Celia’s breath symbolizes her release from him. She does not take him in, but exhales. This symbolizes her rejecting him. I think these symbols were very influential in the way I interpreted this poem.
In conclusion, I really enjoyed this poem, and digging into its underlying meaning. At first I found the language very hard to follow, and read it so many times I now have it memorized. I researched other people’s thoughts online, and realized that I had taken a different perspective on the poem compared to other reviews. I always find it interesting to see how differently people think, and how the meanings of these poems take life in the individual depending on their own experiences.
By Cathy Zapata

| Posted on 2010-09-07 | by a guest


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Hi! we cannot say that one\'s analysis is wrong,,because you cannot define its meaning in one package. The meaning of any literary piece, be it a poem or anything, depends on the reader\'s perception and present mood or emotion.. I\'ll say based on my own understanding, that this is about a man so captivated by a woman\'s beauty.That his passion for her will last for a long time, i just don\'t know for sure until when. When the woman sent the flower back, who (aside from the writer himself that had been long buried and lying down the earth for 3 centuries)can tell what it means? There are numerous reasons and nobody can guess, like when will Jesus would go down here and wipe out all bad dudes..See? there are no definite answer to \"what does it means?\" It depends on the reader\'s perception and there are no wrong answers. -To the one who posted saying- \"Obviously,you are all wrong!\"-- please, stop actin\' like a real smart-assed!!!

| Posted on 2010-08-21 | by a guest


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song to celia is about a man courting a lady where in he give roses but celia reject it so the man plant the rose and celia appreaciate the rose

| Posted on 2010-03-17 | by a guest


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(If you have not read the post below this one, then please do in order to understand this clarification). Sorry, but I forgot to clarify two things. First, I meant to add that there is a progression from his focus on the woman's body parts, from romantic to sexual. This focus on her body can be seen by the Jove's nector and how he would GIVE UP IMMORTALITY, obviously expressing something sneaky is going on. Also with cavalier poetry can be the reference to quickly enjoying the short life that humans live, which can be seen by the speaker giving up on living eternally by the nector which brings a light of realism that humans don't live forever, so enjoy it while you can.
The second part that needs clarifying is the wreath of roses. Remember, the poets audience is women, and a rose is extremely desireful in a relationship. However, men's desire is something with a hole in it similar to the hole in the wreath. This suggests how he is trying to give her sex (offering the roses). However, she rejects them, giving this womanly hole only her scent (the refusal is basically keeping her virginity, the poet's main message).

| Posted on 2010-01-21 | by a guest


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Obviously, you are all wrong (except the Jove guy). If you notice the structure of the poem, you can see that he goes from just the eyes, to the mouth, and then eventually (with the reference to Jove's nector) her body which he describes as more beautiful then a goddess. Also to note are the constant stresses of action imagery, as he does not go into detailed descriptions of the parts of her body expressing a very general statement. These "general descriptions" and specific actions (which anyone can perform such as looking dreamily into one's eyes or choosing the girl over the nector) along with a lack of even stating Celia in the poem show's how the Speaker (not the Poet) may have used this poem to more than one woman. Yes, he is trying to express how he wants to madly love her (in the sense of sex), as is the main conflict of many cavalier poetry. However, this is not the authorial intent that cavalier poets desire. The poets authorial intent is actually a message to women in general, to watch out for sly men, which can be seen in this poem by the rejection of his rosy wreaths (any symbolic references to a hole that permanently has her scent on it?), which suggests that she did not want to have sex with a guy who truly did not love her. Many cavalier poets write with this intent to try to warn women against such fluffy language, as can best be seen in the poem "To His Coy Mistress". To prove how powerful and fluffy such language actually is can be seen by many of the earlier comments on how "I think it's a very sweet poem" or "what a beautiful love poem", expressing how women even in this modern age are fooled by man's true intent!
Also, this was analyzed by a 16 year old AP English Student. (All of these ideas confirmed by my english teacher and many other cavalier poetry lessons, which I got an A on).

| Posted on 2010-01-21 | by a guest


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what does "drink" and
"pledge" with eyes mean
in this poem

| Posted on 2009-12-22 | by a guest


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this is a good poem i like it but not so much on the part when she sends him back the flowers she should of kept them i would if i was her;]
by:melissa aka molly dolly

| Posted on 2009-12-02 | by a guest


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this is a good poem i like it but not so much on the part when she sends him back the flowers she should of kept them i would if i was her;]
by:melissa aka molly dolly

| Posted on 2009-12-02 | by a guest


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I see this poem in a different sense. I do not see it as romantic or compassionate but slightly psychotic. He talks about committing to her, and yet he has only just set eyes upon her across the room. She sends the flower back, relaying the fact that she is not interested and yet all he notices is it now has her breath on it. She may not have even intended to breathe on it but he looks past this and sees it as a clear sign his feelings are reciprocated back to him from her. As the courtly tradition she is probably already married which could back up why she sent the gift back. When i read this poem i just get the image of a man trying to hold the attention of a woman he is attracted to across the room, and she is politely declining his offers. He never states anything she does back to him. I just fail to see the romantic side to it.

| Posted on 2009-10-24 | by a guest


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This is a very sweet poem and it is my favourite too
In this poenm speaker is expressing his deep feelings and love for Celia,He wants the faithful love from his frind tht's why he said" Drink to me with thine eyes and i will pledge with mine"He does not want to exchange his glass of wine with jove's nector cup i.e the roman god (Jupitor) Jove's nector or the drink of god,Speaker would give up the drink of the god for a drink from a cup which her lips merely have touched, but its not wine he searches for. He simply wishes for his lovers love.
Then He sends her a rosy wreath.He send them to devote her that they would not withered their and remains fresh, but she send it back to him after breathing and since than roses are giving the smell of his friend.Such a nice poem.charming tribute of love that age of love poems.
speaker has deep and compelling love for his love celia that he is willing to give up anything in particular in exchange for Celia's compassion and love

| Posted on 2009-10-15 | by a guest


.: :.

This is a very sweet poem and it is my favourite too
In this poenm speaker is expressing his deep feelings and love for Celia,He wants the faithful love from his frind tht's why he said" Drink to me with thine eyes and i will pledge with mine"He does not want to exchange his glass of wine with jove's nector cup i.e the roman god (Jupitor) Jove's nector or the drink of god,Speaker would give up the drink of the god for a drink from a cup which her lips merely have touched, but its not wine he searches for. He simply wishes for his lovers love.
Then He sends her a rosy wreath.He send them to devote her that they would not withered their and remains fresh, but she send it back to him after breathing and since than roses are giving the smell of his friend.Such a nice poem.charming tribute of love that age of love poems.
speaker has deep and compelling love for his love celia that he is willing to give up anything in particular in exchange for Celia's compassion and love

| Posted on 2009-10-15 | by a guest


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my analysis for this poem is that the speaker has deep and compelling love for Celia that he is willing to give up anything in particular in exchange for Celia's compassion and love. He had attempted to court her by sending her roses but unfortunately Celia declines his offer and sent it back to him. But when the roses was returnde, it no longer smell like it did but now it posess the fragrance and smell of thy beloved Celia. This love poem gives an overview to men that feels and experiences exactly the same way to the speaker. In this case, the speaker failed in his ever-flaming love for Celia. Just like most men do. No offense guyz..but it is a fact..
-cezenne japson

| Posted on 2009-07-22 | by a guest


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Love is foolishness, logic defied.
For you, Tales 'f two cities 's a whine ?
Pierre ppplll

| Posted on 2009-06-30 | by a guest


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Has anyone thought that this could have been a woman? Maybe that is why the wreath was sent back? What is masculine about the writing? Wine? Considering that most poems give of some context clues about gender, this one is a little different. It is very sappy, and unlike other love poems.

| Posted on 2009-05-28 | by a guest


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I hope everyone knows that person is completely WRONG. The speaker is not choosing the woman over WINE. He is choosing her over the gift of immortality. Jove (also called Jupiter)is the chief god in Roman mythology. "Jove's nectar," or the drink of the gods, gave immortality to those who drank it. So, either the speaker is choosing his love over immortalit or the implication could be that his love gives him immortality. Okay, I'm glad I'm 16 years old and have to explain this to you.

| Posted on 2008-12-30 | by a guest


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Can some one help me to find all of the poetic devices present in this poem?

| Posted on 2008-08-17 | by a guest


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Song of Celia is a charming tribute to a woman in that age of love poems

| Posted on 2008-07-28 | by a guest


.: Hahah!! I'm first :.

This is purely my own opinion. Please don't plagiarize



Song: To Celia, by Ben Johnson (1573-1637) is a simple love song from a man to a woman. He is totally captivated by her and would give up anything just to drink from the same cup as her. He sent Celia a bouquet of roses, but she returns them. However when he receives them back, the roses smell of her.
This literary work has been written if first person. The speaker refers to himself multiple times as he speaks of actions that he will carry out. His tone is dreamy with a wisp of yearning. The speaker is caught up in his emotions and is unable to clearly see reality. He cant clearly show how he feels, so he speaks with symbols that are metaphors to the way he truly feels. The whole first stanza represents his feelings for Celia through the simple task of drinking wine. The thirst is the same for every man. The lust for a woman and calming the fear of being alone. The structure of the poem is lyrical, with couplets that have the second line rhyming with a -ine in the first stance and a -e in the second. This adds to the rhythm and helps organize the speakers thoughts, giving the poem structure.
In the first line the speaker personifies Celias eyes like telling her to Drink only to me with thine eyes continuing the personification by saying he will pledge with mine. The speaker wants Celia to give in to him and his wants, but he promises to be faithful to her. The man is madly in love and speaks in enigmatize. His words dont make sense to a logical mind, but love is not of the mind. It is from the heart. . He ask a drink divine to quench the thirst that from the soul doth rise. Continuing with his riddle, he explains his flow of thoughts rather cryptically when he states might I of Joves nectar sup, I would not change for thine. Simply through this allusion to the Roman gods, this man would give up the drink of the for a drink from a cup her lips merely have touched, but its not wine he searches for. He simply wishes for Celias love. The author illustrates the mans situation through a hyperbole. It has been greatly over exaggerated, and this mans emotions are obviously not grounded and rational. The second stanza begins with an attempt to court the beloved Celia. He sends her a rosy wreath. He doesnt devote it to her because it cant compare with her. Even when she returns it, his passion doesnt allow him to see reality. He swears that the rose smells not of itself, but thee. This analogy creates a paradox. The rose, which the man previously stated could not compare with Celia, now smells of her. This man has become another victim of the love bug.
While reading this poem, I couldnt help but feel slightly disgusted. This man has allowed himself to become consumed with his passion. He has abandoned the logic, and even though he has been rejected, he holds on to a lost cause. I also felt slightly envious. The feelings this man must be feeling must be strong and compelling. He is stubborn and determined, but, overall, he still disappoints me. He shows weakness in character by not simply confronting her. Women did not, and still do not approve of men who cannot follow the proper courting rituals. This man still has some growing up to do, and he needs to do it fast before he gets his heart destroyed.


-trekie4ever@aim.com-

| Posted on 2007-03-12 | by a guest




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