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Sonnet 36: Let me confess that we two must be twain Analysis



Author: poem of William Shakespeare Type: poem Views: 45

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Let me confess that we two must be twain,
Although our undivided loves are one;
So shall those blots that do with me remain,
Without thy help, by me be borne alone.
In our two loves there is but one respect,
Though in our lives a separable spite,
Which, though it alter not love's sole effect,
Yet doth it steal sweet hours from love's delight.
I may not evermore acknowledge thee,
Lest my bewailèd guilt should do thee shame,
Nor thou with public kindness honour me
Unless thou take that honour from thy name.
    But do not so; I love thee in such sort
    As, thou being mine, mine is thy good report.

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No Love Can Be Separated by Spite
Can love survive endless separation? Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 36” describes in brief the brutality of separation and the pain of shame and guilt. This poem focuses on two people who want to be together but cannot because of the poet’s reputation, which will somehow end their companionship. The poet’s guilt and shame over his reputation has caused this separation, but yet he continues to acknowledge his endless love for his beloved. The poet stresses how the two must be separated but yet he continues to recognize their love for one another by using metaphor and word choice of togetherness and apartness.
Shakespeare uses the word “twain” in the first line of the sonnet to express a sense of apartness. In The Oxford English Dictionary Online the word twain is described as “separated, or apart”. The poet is using the word twain to express a sense of separation between the two. Although he is using the word twain in the first line to express separation, he continues by saying “Although our undivided loves are one” (2). Now in a sense of togetherness, Shakespeare is expressing their “undivided loves”. This use of metaphors suggests that they are married. Although we do not know at this point if his spouse is a male or female, we come to the conclusion that the poet is married. Shakespeare’s use of togetherness and apartness in the first two lines demonstrates that he wants to be with this person, but yet can’t for some undefined reason

| Posted on 2011-11-15 | by a guest




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