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The Death Of The Ball Turret Gunner Analysis



Author: poem of Randall Jarrell Type: poem Views: 13


From my mother's sleep I fell into the State,
And I hunched in its belly till my wet fur froze.
Six miles from earth, loosed from its dream of life,
I woke to black flak and the nightmare fighters.
When I died they washed me out of the turret with a hose.

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




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I think this poem speaks about a solider who is very young when he inter the army of United State .He never dreamed like another children .He every day takes hi plane and fights for his country .He plane always fly away from earth(six miles).until he is frozen because of cold air ,and when he died they use water to wash hi thrown flesh out of the plane .I think abortion is the dream that never come true (life)and (happiness).

| Posted on 2013-05-05 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is a brief but detailed description of the brutality of war, simultaneously making references to pregnancy. The \"dream of life\" refers to the gunners thought of what life outside of war is. Dream-like. The author suggests that the gunner was quite young because he fell from his \"mothers sleep\" in to the State. The poem could be linked to abortion because it was frowned upon during the time period that this poem was written. It shows the horrific nature of war is similar to that of abortion. That is my understanding of this poem.

| Posted on 2012-10-21 | by a guest


.: :.

We had discussed this poem in length in my WRT 102 class which is all about analyzing pieces of literature. We can relate it to abortion towards the end of the class. We had come up with the thought though abortions went really discussed and were considered taboo during the late 1950\'s they still had them but didn\'t discuss them for the disgrace that it brought upon the woman. But keep in mind that its poetry and its free to interrupt the way the reader sees fit.

| Posted on 2012-03-06 | by a guest


.: :.

I am just researching this poem to finish up an assignment early but seriously? Just because it abortion is a prominent debate in our modern time, does not make it one 67 years earlier. It is a false connection at best. Anyone who believed this was in the literal sense abortion, needs to go back to taking analysis lessons. It was explaining just how sudden and abruptly life may begin and end with no cause and no meaning. How fascinating it is to just exist and have meaning to being gone and missed. War is confusion and confusion is hell.

| Posted on 2012-02-29 | by a guest


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the poem was written just after the world war two, and long before modern day abortion was a significant problem. in any study of poetry you are taught to always relate the poem to the title. sure there are a few lines that can be thought of in reference of abortion, but \"froze\" \"flak\" and a few other words support the war stance without any posible translation to abortion. flak is a type of defensive explosive used to take down enemy plans. \"froze\" refers to the freezing of sweat as altitude increases. ball turret gunners were often the first to be targeted by enemy defenses because then the b-17\'s were open to attack by fighter planes.
Bear

| Posted on 2012-01-23 | by a guest


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Apparently it depends on the way someone interprets the poem i can understand how someone could think that it could be about abortion but in my opinion i think its about a gunner that operated a ball turret.

| Posted on 2012-01-23 | by a guest


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Apparently it depends on the way someone interprets the poem i can understand how someone could think that it could be about abortion but in my opinion i think its about a gunner that operated a ball turret.

| Posted on 2012-01-23 | by a guest


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Apparently it depends on the way the person interpet it

| Posted on 2012-01-23 | by a guest


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Hearing the poet recite his poem makes a huge difference in the interpretation of the poem. The poem is about death and the horrors of being a ball turret gunner. The belief that this poem has anything to do with abortion seems pretty far fetched. I believe it has more to do with the shortness of life and, like I said above, the horrors of being a ball turret gunner.

| Posted on 2011-12-13 | by a guest


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Nothing is obvious about this poem except that of course it definitely talks about a war and the death of a ball turret gunner. But you can not conclude that this is the only interpretation, that in fact is the beauty of an interpretation. It is the way someone interprets it their own way. This poem can be interpreted in many ways, as to whether it is about war or abortion, abortion was not really an issue than so i doubt he really had it in mind, but if you do your research every line in this poem can have a double meaning alluding to abortion. In almost every poetry book that has Jarrel Randall in it, they say he is renowned for his simplicity of poems that result in making your minds contemplate if the simplicity is really what is to be conveyed or if there is yet a secret meaning. The fact is that everything about an analysis and interpretations are that it is opinionated and really there is no right answer. There really is no hard evidence that this poem means either, and please dont bring up the side note that Randall adds, because many poets don\'t completely elude to everything the poem means in side-notes because they want you to question and think about what they are saying. There is no right answer to this. I believe, as someone stated earlier on a comment, that this poem is simply stating how war, or quite simply many other things since war could be a metaphor too, aborts life.
just a side note, if you are trying to sound intelligent and like you know what you are talking about, please don\'t site wikipedia. I\'m a debater and wiki is not considered a remarkably reliable source. Anyone can go on wiki and type stuff in, i can go and type stuff into wiki and i may have no idea what im talking about.
~~samm

| Posted on 2011-09-14 | by a guest


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I can\'t believe that some people would think this refers to abortion. This poem was written many yaers ago. It is in regards to a ball gunner turret. Period. How can we say our Country isn\'t in trouble and at the same time have people stae something as idiotic as this. So very sad.

| Posted on 2011-09-07 | by a guest


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well i personally believe the poem could be about either the turret gunner or abortion depending on how you interpret it. t

| Posted on 2011-06-24 | by a guest


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Can\'t a poem be interpreted differently from the poet\'s? I mean, isn\'t that the beauty of poetry? You get something you don\'t expect.

| Posted on 2011-04-01 | by a guest


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I think it can be safely speculated that abortion was the farthest thing from Randall Jarrell\'s mind. Pregnancy was the metaphor, suspended in the ball turret, forced into a fetal position. The wet fur froze refers to high altitude bombing missions in unpressurized airframes, where sweat would freeze. The air outside at that altitude would be about 60 degrees below sea level air, so if it\'s 50F at sea level, it would be -10F at 30,000 feet (six miles from earth). Abortion was illegal at the time in the US, so it makes no sense to protest against it. Any proper protest of that era would have been to legalize it. Those who seek to politicize this poem in that fashion are desperate to make coincidental connections.

| Posted on 2011-03-07 | by a guest


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i think both answers are correct in a sense that the poem could have a double meaning. as the words both describe a man fighting in war and an abortion so shut up...

| Posted on 2011-01-24 | by a guest


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About abortion - why would the poet be thinking of that?? The poem was written shortly after the war and the poet was focused on expressing to the world the quick horror of death in the ball turret. My father and my mother\'s brother were pilots of B17s and B24s and spoke of instances in which planes in their squadrons had to belly land when the landing gear was damaged and the ball turret was smashed. In some instances the gunner was trapped in the turret so knew it was just a short time before he would die. All the crew could do for the doomed man was talk to him to try to give some comfort and to let him know they would never forget him. Abortion was illegal at that time and not an issue or topic of general discussion. HIGHLY unlikely the poet was writing specifically of that - not after experiencing the overwhelming horror of war. Whoever focuses on abortion when discussing this poem insults those living, breathing, thinking men in the ball turrets, those gunners who made the supreme sacrifice in WWII.

| Posted on 2010-11-10 | by a guest


.: :.

hey guys, this thing is about both WW2 and abortion, jarrell wrote this because he thought that war aborts life. he gives a double meaning to everything because war kills innocent men and abortion kills innocent children, their the same meaning to him. the fetus is washed out aka the soldier, and the plane is still good, representing how the mother goes on living. again this peice is how WAR Aborts LIFE

| Posted on 2010-10-26 | by a guest


.: :.

The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner
The poem expresses the solder\'s feelings of the war. His nightmare fighters, and how he died and was washed out of the without a warning turret hose.

| Posted on 2010-09-23 | by a guest


.: :.

This piece of literature is nothing short of description of a military aircraft gunner who was killed in a war. Though I will bring up some very valid points please find it in your thoughts not to criticize them. First, when the author says, \"From my mother\'s sleep I fell into the State\", the reader begins to automatically assume that State= The United States. Well this piece was written in 1945, the time of World War II. Why would a friendly aircraft be shot down in the United States? I think when author says \"State\" he means a state of unconsciousness. Next, \"And I hunched in its belly till my wet fur froze\" may mean that he is in a cold area (such as Germany or Russia)? Continuing along, \"Six miles from the earth, loosed from it dream of life\" means that the plane was plucked from the sky at about 6 miles altitude. Moving on, \"I woke to black flak and the nightmare fighters\", a flak is a vest that soldiers on aircrafts used to wear as a protective device. The author wakes to his armor burnt and death coming fast. \"The nightmare fighters\", what ends a nightmare? Waking up, but could prevent a nightmare? Staying awake can fight a nightmare. The gunner awoke to loud noises such as cannons going off and gun fire all around him. That\'s my points I would like to include in this discussion. Feel free to debate and share. Also, whoever brought up abortion is without a doubt, incorrect.

| Posted on 2010-08-04 | by a guest


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Okay. Srsly the poem is about the Death DEATH of the Ball Turret Gunner. Where in the heck are you getting abortion out of this?! Don't you know the background?

| Posted on 2010-07-25 | by a guest


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Jarrell, who served in the Army Air Force, provided the following explanatory note:
"A ball turret was a plexiglass sphere set into the belly of a B-17 or B-24, and inhabited by two .50 caliber machine guns and one man, a short small man. When this gunner tracked with his machine guns a fighter attacking his bomber from below, he revolved with the turret; hunched upsidedown in his little sphere. The fighters which attacked him were armed with cannon firing explosive shells. The hose was a steam hose."

from wikipedia
clearly not about abortion

| Posted on 2010-06-10 | by a guest


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.: :.
I think this may only be an analysis of the writing. No requests for explanation or general short comments allowed. Due to Spam Posts are moderated before posted.
| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest
.: :.
I think Death of the ball turret gunner is a pretty cool because eh kills aleins and doesnt afraid of anything
| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest
.: :.
In From my mother's sleep I was born and raised, in the playground where I spent most of days, chilling out maxin relaxin all cool shooting some b-ball outside of my school when a couple of nazis were up to no good starting making trouble in neighorhood
| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest
.: :.
I du no about you guys but I personaly think its all about abortion no matter what you guys say.
| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest
.: :.
This poem is a bout The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner.
| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest
.: :.
In the first line somebody "fell" into the "State" from his "mother's sleep". "Fell" indicates that this was not a deliberate act. "State" is spelled with a capital S like in United States. "Mother's sleep" depicts the time before the "fall", it creates a peaceful picture of home. This could be interpreted as a young man living at home, getting drafted for military service. This viewpoint certainly explains the "State" well, "mother's sleep" remains somewhat odd. A different interpretation would be the act of one's mother sleeping with a man, resulting in the state of pregnancy, making the lyrical I an unborn child. This interpretation explains the expression "my mother's sleep" much better, however again something is odd, in this case the "State" of pregnancy. In both interpretations, the lyrical I is brought passively into its position.
The second line uses "hunched" to describe the position, matching both, a ball turret gunner and fetus. "Belly" could refer to a pregnant woman's belly, and the amniotic fluid in her uterus is certainly "wet". The expression "froze" indicates coldness and therefore matches the bomber plane, which in World War II had not been heated.
The third line speaks of "six miles from earth", which is roughly the height in which bomber planes fly. However "miles" is phonetically not so far from months. And most abortions are executed six months before birth.
The fourth line is obviously close to the military interpretation as is the last line. However, if you replace "turret" with "utero" (except for "o", both words are spelled with the same letters) this line completely fits into the abortion interpretation.
The poem has two levels, one is the more obvious military interpretation. It leaves us with some strange expressions ("mother's sleep", "belly", "wet") which are not easily explained. If you dig deeper, you can find a second level, explaining these terms. This level is more hidden, e.g. if you have not noticed it till line three, you are not going to notice it in the last couple of lines. For me, this is the beauty of this poem.
As for the discussion about Pro-Choice vs. Pro-Life, I would say that Jarrell's poem is on neither side. It merely depicts (in a poetic way) the horror of an abortion for the unborn child like it depicts the horror of a young man getting killed in war. But there is no ethical judgment about neither the war nor the abortion.
| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest
.: :.
Randall Jarrell had a short explanation note that said, ďA ball turret was a Plexiglas sphere set into the belly of a B-17 or B-24, and inhabited by two .50 caliber machine guns and one man, a short small man. When this gunner tracked with his machine guns a fighter attacking his bomber from below, he revolved with the turret; hunched upside-down in his little sphere, he looked like the fetus in the womb. The fighters which attacked him were armed with cannon firing explosive shells. The hose was a steam hose." He alludes to an abortion. He takes two controversial subjects that the entire world faces and intertwines them to show that both decisions concerning abortion and war are hard to justify or prove immoral. Jarrell is a genius and the complexity of this piece is astounding.
| Posted on 2010-05-02 | by a guest
.: :.
Jarrell is obviously talking about abortion or a lost fetus. Every line in the poem has two meanings. One suited for the WWII aspect and another for the abortion aspect. Pick up any book on poetry with the death of the ball turret gunner in it and it will tell you that it has a double meaning.
| Posted on 2010-04-14 | by a guest
.: :.
I don't know why people think this poem is about abortion. It hads nothing to do with it. If you did some studying, he's referring to world war 2. He's talking about the soldier in a ball turret in the middle, or like the "belly", of a B-17 or B-24 airplane. He's hunched in this thing freezing his butt off because there was no heat on the planes. How people got abortion out of this is beyond me.
| Posted on 2010-04-09 | by a guest
.: :.
In the first line somebody "fell" into the "State" from his "mother's sleep". "Fell" indicates that this was not a deliberate act. "State" is spelled with a capital S like in United States. "Mother's sleep" depicts the time before the "fall", it creates a peaceful picture of home. This could be interpreted as a young man living at home, getting drafted for military service. This viewpoint certainly explains the "State" well, "mother's sleep" remains somewhat odd. A different interpretation would be the act of one's mother sleeping with a man, resulting in the state of pregnancy, making the lyrical I an unborn child. This interpretation explains the expression "my mother's sleep" much better, however again something is odd, in this case the "State" of pregnancy. In both interpretations, the lyrical I is brought passively into its position.
The second line uses "hunched" to describe the position, matching both, a ball turret gunner and fetus. "Belly" could refer to a pregnant woman's belly, and the amniotic fluid in her uterus is certainly "wet". The expression "froze" indicates coldness and therefore matches the bomber plane, which in World War II had not been heated.
The third line speaks of "six miles from earth", which is roughly the height in which bomber planes fly. However "miles" is phonetically not so far from months. And most abortions are executed six months before birth.
The fourth line is obviously close to the military interpretation as is the last line. However, if you replace "turret" with "utero" (except for "o", both words are spelled with the same letters) this line completely fits into the abortion interpretation.
The poem has two levels, one is the more obvious military interpretation. It leaves us with some strange expressions ("mother's sleep", "belly", "wet") which are not easily explained. If you dig deeper, you can find a second level, explaining these terms. This level is more hidden, e.g. if you have not noticed it till line three, you are not going to notice it in the last couple of lines. For me, this is the beauty of this poem.
As for the discussion about Pro-Choice vs. Pro-Life, I would say that Jarrell's poem is on neither side. It merely depicts (in a poetic way) the horror of an abortion for the unborn child like it depicts the horror of a young man getting killed in war. But there is no ethical judgment about neither the war nor the abortion.
| Posted on 2010-03-22 | by a guest
.: :.
As I was reading notes made by Randall himself, he was refering to the gunner resembling a fetus in the womb of it's mother. So I personally think that it is about abortion.
| Posted on 2010-02-05 | by a guest
.: :.
I agree there are some parallels to abortion but I think you are over analyzing the poem. Different people take in different things sure but some things are ridiculous. When people read a poem about a turret gunner in WW2 and g

| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this may only be an analysis of the writing. No requests for explanation or general short comments allowed. Due to Spam Posts are moderated before posted.

| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest


.: :.

I think Death of the ball turret gunner is a pretty cool because eh kills aleins and doesnt afraid of anything

| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest


.: :.

In From my mother's sleep I was born and raised, in the playground where I spent most of days, chilling out maxin relaxin all cool shooting some b-ball outside of my school when a couple of nazis were up to no good starting making trouble in neighorhood

| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest


.: :.

I du no about you guys but I personaly think its all about abortion no matter what you guys say.

| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is a bout The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner.

| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest


.: :.

In the first line somebody "fell" into the "State" from his "mother's sleep". "Fell" indicates that this was not a deliberate act. "State" is spelled with a capital S like in United States. "Mother's sleep" depicts the time before the "fall", it creates a peaceful picture of home. This could be interpreted as a young man living at home, getting drafted for military service. This viewpoint certainly explains the "State" well, "mother's sleep" remains somewhat odd. A different interpretation would be the act of one's mother sleeping with a man, resulting in the state of pregnancy, making the lyrical I an unborn child. This interpretation explains the expression "my mother's sleep" much better, however again something is odd, in this case the "State" of pregnancy. In both interpretations, the lyrical I is brought passively into its position.
The second line uses "hunched" to describe the position, matching both, a ball turret gunner and fetus. "Belly" could refer to a pregnant woman's belly, and the amniotic fluid in her uterus is certainly "wet". The expression "froze" indicates coldness and therefore matches the bomber plane, which in World War II had not been heated.
The third line speaks of "six miles from earth", which is roughly the height in which bomber planes fly. However "miles" is phonetically not so far from months. And most abortions are executed six months before birth.
The fourth line is obviously close to the military interpretation as is the last line. However, if you replace "turret" with "utero" (except for "o", both words are spelled with the same letters) this line completely fits into the abortion interpretation.
The poem has two levels, one is the more obvious military interpretation. It leaves us with some strange expressions ("mother's sleep", "belly", "wet") which are not easily explained. If you dig deeper, you can find a second level, explaining these terms. This level is more hidden, e.g. if you have not noticed it till line three, you are not going to notice it in the last couple of lines. For me, this is the beauty of this poem.
As for the discussion about Pro-Choice vs. Pro-Life, I would say that Jarrell's poem is on neither side. It merely depicts (in a poetic way) the horror of an abortion for the unborn child like it depicts the horror of a young man getting killed in war. But there is no ethical judgment about neither the war nor the abortion.

| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest


.: :.

Randall Jarrell had a short explanation note that said, ďA ball turret was a Plexiglas sphere set into the belly of a B-17 or B-24, and inhabited by two .50 caliber machine guns and one man, a short small man. When this gunner tracked with his machine guns a fighter attacking his bomber from below, he revolved with the turret; hunched upside-down in his little sphere, he looked like the fetus in the womb. The fighters which attacked him were armed with cannon firing explosive shells. The hose was a steam hose." He alludes to an abortion. He takes two controversial subjects that the entire world faces and intertwines them to show that both decisions concerning abortion and war are hard to justify or prove immoral. Jarrell is a genius and the complexity of this piece is astounding.

| Posted on 2010-05-02 | by a guest


.: :.

Jarrell is obviously talking about abortion or a lost fetus. Every line in the poem has two meanings. One suited for the WWII aspect and another for the abortion aspect. Pick up any book on poetry with the death of the ball turret gunner in it and it will tell you that it has a double meaning.

| Posted on 2010-04-14 | by a guest


.: :.

I don't know why people think this poem is about abortion. It hads nothing to do with it. If you did some studying, he's referring to world war 2. He's talking about the soldier in a ball turret in the middle, or like the "belly", of a B-17 or B-24 airplane. He's hunched in this thing freezing his butt off because there was no heat on the planes. How people got abortion out of this is beyond me.

| Posted on 2010-04-09 | by a guest


.: :.

In the first line somebody "fell" into the "State" from his "mother's sleep". "Fell" indicates that this was not a deliberate act. "State" is spelled with a capital S like in United States. "Mother's sleep" depicts the time before the "fall", it creates a peaceful picture of home. This could be interpreted as a young man living at home, getting drafted for military service. This viewpoint certainly explains the "State" well, "mother's sleep" remains somewhat odd. A different interpretation would be the act of one's mother sleeping with a man, resulting in the state of pregnancy, making the lyrical I an unborn child. This interpretation explains the expression "my mother's sleep" much better, however again something is odd, in this case the "State" of pregnancy. In both interpretations, the lyrical I is brought passively into its position.
The second line uses "hunched" to describe the position, matching both, a ball turret gunner and fetus. "Belly" could refer to a pregnant woman's belly, and the amniotic fluid in her uterus is certainly "wet". The expression "froze" indicates coldness and therefore matches the bomber plane, which in World War II had not been heated.
The third line speaks of "six miles from earth", which is roughly the height in which bomber planes fly. However "miles" is phonetically not so far from months. And most abortions are executed six months before birth.
The fourth line is obviously close to the military interpretation as is the last line. However, if you replace "turret" with "utero" (except for "o", both words are spelled with the same letters) this line completely fits into the abortion interpretation.
The poem has two levels, one is the more obvious military interpretation. It leaves us with some strange expressions ("mother's sleep", "belly", "wet") which are not easily explained. If you dig deeper, you can find a second level, explaining these terms. This level is more hidden, e.g. if you have not noticed it till line three, you are not going to notice it in the last couple of lines. For me, this is the beauty of this poem.
As for the discussion about Pro-Choice vs. Pro-Life, I would say that Jarrell's poem is on neither side. It merely depicts (in a poetic way) the horror of an abortion for the unborn child like it depicts the horror of a young man getting killed in war. But there is no ethical judgment about neither the war nor the abortion.

| Posted on 2010-03-22 | by a guest


.: :.

As I was reading notes made by Randall himself, he was refering to the gunner resembling a fetus in the womb of it's mother. So I personally think that it is about abortion.

| Posted on 2010-02-05 | by a guest


.: :.

I agree there are some parallels to abortion but I think you are over analyzing the poem. Different people take in different things sure but some things are ridiculous. When people read a poem about a turret gunner in WW2 and get it's about abortion then there is something wrong. Do some research or read Randall Jarrell's notes. They are online. Try and do some research before you just read the poem and come up with a meaning for it.

| Posted on 2010-01-24 | by a guest


.: :.

Just a few points: Air Force jackets (or Army Air Corps to be precise) were lined with wolf fur. It was the warmest available. The gunner is sweating with fear and freezing at 35,000 feet. "Loosed from its dream of life" - the soldier loses his humanity. It's kill or be killed far from earth and home. And yes he would doze off a bit. It took hours to get to the target, pre-dawn, in a droning freezing aircraft. The last line is sadly, graphically, practical. Re-fuel, new gunner, & get her back in the air for another mission.

| Posted on 2009-12-12 | by a guest


.: :.

You can easily pick out the authoritarian-styled guest posters. They are the ones who are so sure of the rightness of their viewpoints,,so certain of their own moral superiority and bitterly caustic in their denunciation of any opposing opinion.

| Posted on 2009-12-11 | by a guest


.: :.

In response to the "abortion" analysis...this is not about abortion. It is a clever connection but he didn't write this as a form of social protest. He was a Fighter pilot in WW2 and this was his reaction to what he witnessed. He was disgusted with the dehumanizing effects of war. It also protests violence and blames the war on the state. He is not advocating that we all be pro-choice, though you may like to believe that.

| Posted on 2009-10-10 | by a guest


.: :.

Well, the abortion motif certainly exists in this poem, there is no doubt about it. However, this is not meant to make any comment on abortions themselves, they are not the topic. It is only used to draw an image of a human being that basically hasn't lived at all, is pretty much born dead (or not born at all). This man is ejected from the protection of the mother's womb, just to enter a life that is not a life at all, but a violent nightmare which inevitably leads to a violent death. The soldier is then ejected from this artificial womb (the belly of the machine, the State, the substitute mother) by means of a steam hose. This abortion imagery has been noted before by many scholars. Just don't take it for something it is not. Jarrell is NOT making any social commentary on abortions here!
Otherwise, if anyone has troubles interpreting this poem (which is really an easy one), there are several good books on Jarrell's literary life, his military years, and this poem specifically. But it makes a lot of sense not to read this as a stand alone poem, but to read it after having studied and understood all of "Little Friend, Little Friend", the volume from which this poem comes.

| Posted on 2009-08-30 | by a guest


.: :.

Abortion, dudes you're smoking the good stuff, and here I thought religious zealots didn't smoke the wacky stuff. This is about a young boy taken from his home to serve, if he was in a ball turret he was small of stature. With a ceiling of 35,000 feet the B-17 crew dressed in leather and wool; you ever wear these you sweat, and at 10,000 feet or higher that sweat will freeze. Six miles from earth...ceiling of 35,000, six miles, that high most records show these brave men slept with oxygen. Waking to flak and fighters meant the plane was back down to to bombing altitude of 10,000 feet and the fight was on. If there was even a turret after the mission, and it contained a dead solider, a hose would be the beast way to clean up. Abortion, how off base can you get? Well you see what you want to see, and hear what you want to hear.

| Posted on 2009-08-27 | by a guest


.: :.

Personally I think that Randall Jarrell intentionally meant for this connection with abortion. Because not every person has been to war so those who havenít can truly grasp how terrible it is. I think he was comparing horror that war is with something that is more relatable as abortion. Knowing that your going to die having no power to stop it.

| Posted on 2009-05-14 | by a guest




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