famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

Those Dancing Days Are Gone Analysis



Author: poem of William Butler Yeats Type: poem Views: 23


Come, let me sing into your ear;
Those dancing days are gone,
All that silk and satin gear;
Crouch upon a stone,
Wrapping that foul body up
In as foul a rag:
I carry the sun in a golden cup.
The moon in a silver bag.

Curse as you may I sing it through;
What matter if the knave
That the most could pleasure you,
The children that he gave,
Are somewhere sleeping like a top
Under a marble flag?
I carry the sun in a golden cup.
The moon in a silver bag.

I thought it out this very day.
Noon upon the clock,
A man may put pretence away
Who leans upon a stick,
May sing, and sing until he drop,
Whether to maid or hag:
I carry the sun in a golden cup,
The moon in a silver bag.

Sponsor


122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




.: Analysis of Yeats poem :.

The poet seems to be evoking the power of poetry, or the blissful elation of thoughtful beauty as opposed to the beauty of youthful agility, in the face of the loss of said agility. So, listen to the song, crouch on a hard stone chair, wrap your aging body in an aged rag, and listen to the grand beauty which is still and always present in the words and thoughts of elated existence.
Yeats says:
"A man may put pretence away
Who leans upon a stick,
May sing, and sing until he drop,"
As in, while an old decrepit man may be, well, old and decrepit, he no longer needs care about the impression he leaves, the judgments he encounters, he may not have the legs to dance, but he has the voice to sing and is free from chains of pretense which we cling to in youth, trying to maintain an edficie, he is free to sing as long and loudly as he wants.

| Posted on 2008-05-20 | by a guest


.: Analysis of Yeats poem :.

The poet seems to be evoking the power of poetry, or the blissful elation of thoughtful beauty as opposed to the beauty of youthful agility, in the face of the loss of said agility. So, listen to the song, crouch on a hard stone chair, wrap your aging body in an aged rag, and listen to the grand beauty which is still and always present in the words and thoughts of elated existence.
Yeats says:
"A man may put pretence away
Who leans upon a stick,
May sing, and sing until he drop,"
As in, while an old decrepit man may be, well, old and decrepit, he no longer needs care about the impression he leaves, the judgments he encounters, he may not have the legs to dance, but he has the voice to sing and is free from chains of pretense which we cling to in youth, trying to maintain an edficie, he is free to sing as long and loudly as he wants.

| Posted on 2008-05-20 | by a guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

Those Dancing Days Are Gone Analysis William Butler Yeats critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Those Dancing Days Are Gone Analysis William Butler Yeats Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation online education meaning metaphors symbolism characterization itunes. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Those Dancing Days Are Gone Analysis William Butler Yeats itunes audio book mp4 mp3



Poetry 1
Poetry 104
Poetry 204
Poetry 49
Poetry 12
Poetry 36
Poetry 7
Poetry 153
Poetry 158
Poetry 14
Poetry 204
Poetry 24
Poetry 44
Poetry 3
Poetry 123
Poetry 13
Poetry 51
Poetry 80
Poetry 91
Poetry 142