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To Autumn Analysis



Author: poem of John Keats Type: poem Views: 30


I
Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
   Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
   With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run;
To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees,
   And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
       To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
   With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
       For Summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells.

II
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
   Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
   Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reap'd furrow sound asleep,
   Drows'd with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
       Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
   Steady thy laden head across a brook;
   Or by a cyder-press, with patient look,
       Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours.

III
Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
   Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,--
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
   And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
   Among the river sallows, borne aloft
       Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
   Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
   The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft;
       And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




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| Posted on 2013-01-31 | by a guest


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If you are in not good state and have no money to get out from that, you will need to take the loans. Just because that should aid you emphatically. I take auto loan every single year and feel OK because of that.

| Posted on 2013-01-30 | by a guest


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in \"while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers\" what does the hook refer to? Why is Autumn collecting/killing flowers? Is this the autumn closer to winter than summer? I don\'t understand.

| Posted on 2011-10-04 | by a guest


.: :.

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run;
To bend with apples the moss\'d cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For summer has o\'er-brimm\'d their clammy cells.
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reap\'d furrow sound asleep,
Drows\'d with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours.
Where are the songs of spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too, -
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.
it explains something about his life and if you don\'t like my comment i\'m just a kid

| Posted on 2011-02-21 | by a guest


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Declared as one of the most perfect poems in the English language, the poem has three eleven-line stanzas which describe a progression through the season, from the late maturation of the crops to the harvest and to the last days of autumn when winter is nearing. The imagery is richly achieved through the personification of Autumn, and the description of its bounty, its sights and sounds.

| Posted on 2011-02-10 | by a guest


.: :.

poems and art is a waste. you guys spend too much time and money on it. i bet you one of the poems i had to write in my 9th grade english class will make me a millionaire, and my 6th graded art of birds can make me the next michelangelo or whoever did that mona lisa painting

| Posted on 2011-02-03 | by a guest


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It is a poem called to Autumn. But it is really about summer.

| Posted on 2010-11-29 | by a guest


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does john keats compare phases of human life in the poem \"the Autumn:?

| Posted on 2010-08-31 | by a guest


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ode to autumn is a poemof extreme beauty and feeling.it gives a complete picture of nature's cycle and man's x andcal m activity and above al wisdom and maturity mark this phase of time and life.it is a great irony that a man of such mature thought was snatched away so early.the personification of the spirit of the season seems to be unisex.

| Posted on 2010-06-18 | by a guest


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Keats tries to convey the uselessness of life in the poem, how one grows old and eventually is forgotten. Much like summer is forgotten in the winter, and vice versa.

| Posted on 2010-04-05 | by a guest


.: :.

It seems that most explanations of the poem skip the lines "And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;"
A gleaner is a person that picks up the grains the reaper misses. These lines therefore illustrate autumn as a woman crossing a brook with a basket of collected, leftover grains upon her head. She is steadying her "laden head" so as to avoid spilling the contents of her basket (as well as falling in).

| Posted on 2010-03-28 | by a guest


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This may be a little unusual, but I see Keats as crying out to the season and sun and all that make up nature for them to repress their efforts to give so much to a people who do not understand nor care to even try to understand how much that nature gives to them. Such an uncaring and ungrateful people do not deserve the many splendors that nature so freely gives.

| Posted on 2010-02-18 | by a guest


.: :.

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run;
To bend with apples the mossed cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For Summer has o'er-brimmed their clammy cell.
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reaped furrow sound asleep,
Drowsed with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers;
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cider-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings, hours by hours.
Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,---
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir, the small gnats mourn
Among the river sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The redbreast whistles from a garden-croft,
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.

| Posted on 2009-08-25 | by a guest


.: :.

The post on 2009-4-10 might have had some cogent commentary, but I missed since I turned off when the guest called "To Autumn" a sonnet. Certainly the young Romantics, including Keats, played with poetic forms and made them their own--but a poem of three eleven line stanzas does not a sonnet make.

| Posted on 2009-04-29 | by a guest


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Jannelle C.'s 2 cents worth of John Keats' "To Autumn"
So it is, another Autumn poem. The subject of Autumn has not fallen short of attention to write about by so many a great poets-although varying in styles, tones and ways of expression. Ecclesiastes alone in the Bible speaks of season and most famous for the line "...For everything there is a season..." Another famous one is Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 which speaks of Autumn in particular. John Keats in this sonnet gives a lively and vivid description of the autumn season and evokes beautiful imagery which his choice of language provides. Through his choice of language, imagery and structuring we are able to relate more and gain insight of Autumn as a human condition of ageing, physical maturity or the advanced stage of one's life rather than just it being a phenomenal passing of or change in season.
Two things can be considered when reading this poem that will render a beautiful meaning to and clearer understanding of it. First is a literal interpretation which the Ode's rich imagery provide as described in the scenry-"mellow fruitfulness", plump hazel shells or ripened fruits which are signs of the particular season. The other would be a more meaningful and deeper interpretation by considering the figurative value of the imagery and the adjectives and verbs used by Keats... The words "mellow fruitfulness", "maturing sun" or "soft-dying day" gives us a feel of a toned-down state: the complete opposite of how summer would be or would bring: a season of scorching heat, lushness o flora or a feeling of liveliness.
Autumn here is personified by Keats as a doer and giver of the action who conspires with its "close-bossom friend" the sun on how to go about doing its job. This is accomplished by Keats by using the words "bend with the apples", "fill all fruit with ripeness", "to swell the grounds, "plump with hazel shells", "to set budding". All these actions are reminiscent of a person performing these actions.
The words "maturing", "mellow", "ripeness" all play a double meaning which is rich in figurative value. A person who is in the latter stage of his life possesses these qualities of being matured physically, toned-down in lifestyle, more matured in his ways, more mellow in manner or mood which is the opposite of youthfulness, liveliness, physical energy.
It is said in in Ecclessiates "..to everything there is a season..." There is Spring, then summer and then Autumn. So is the human condition of old age, a stage of life succeeding youth and adulthood and a stage preceeding death, the winter of one's life, so to speak.
I hope this helps....I'm too tired typing...I know you get the drift..

| Posted on 2009-04-10 | by a guest


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oh there is no perfect Analysis of this poem no one can do it line by line

| Posted on 2008-12-30 | by a guest


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Analysis and commentary of To Autumn by John Keats

In ‘To Autumn’, a superficial reading would suggest that John Keats writes about a typical day of this season, describing all kind of colourful and detailed images. But before commenting on the meaning of the poem, I will briefly talk about its structure, its type and its rhyme.
The poem is an ode[1] that contains three stanzas, and each of these has eleven lines. With respect to its rhyme, ‘To Autumn’ does not follow a perfect pattern. While the first stanza has an ABABCDEDCCE pattern (see the poem on the next page), the second and the third ones have an ABABCDECDDE pattern. However, it is important to say that a poetic license appears in the third stanza. The word ‘wind’ (line 15) is pronounced [waind] to rhyme with ‘find’.
With regard to the meaning of the poem, as I said above, the author makes an intense description of autumn at least at first sight. The first stanza begins showing this season as misty and fruitful, which, with the help of a ‘maturing sun’, ripens the fruit of the vines. Next, we can see clearly a hyperbole[2]. Keats writes that a tree has so many apples that it bends (line 5), while the gourds swell and the hazel shells plumps. Finally, Keats suggests that the bees have a large amount of flowers. And these flowers did not bud in summer but now, in autumn. As a consequence, the bees are incessantly working and their honeycombs are overflowing since summer.
In the second stanza, there is an evident personification[3]. The poet starts asking a rhetoric question (line 12) to autumn which now is not only a woman but a gleaner. However, this woman is apparently resting in a granary or in the landscape:

‘Or on a half-reaped furrow sound asleep,
Drowsed with the fume of poppies…’

As she is not working with her hook, some flowers, that were going to be cut, remain untouchable (lines 17 and 18). Also we can see an image of her hair gently moving. The stanza ends with autumn patiently watching the ‘last oozings’ of cider.
The third stanza continues again with rhetoric questions. In the first one Keats asks the woman where the sounds of the spring are. And the second one is just a repetition of the same question. However, the poet tells autumn that she has her own sounds, although some of them are sad:

‘Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn’

On the contrary, the ‘full-grown lambs’ bleat loudly, the crickets sing, a red-breast whistles, and swallows warble in the sky. Keats also describes a day that is dying, ending, and, as a consequence, is getting rose (lines 25 and 26). The last lines of this stanza consist of a combination of the autumn sounds, of the animal sounds (lines from 30 to 33) as I said before few lines above.
To conclude, although my first impression was that John Keats was simply describing the main characteristics of autumn, and the human and animal activities related to it, a deeper reading could suggest that Keats talks about the process of life. Autumn symbolises maturity in human and animal lives. Some instances of this are the ‘full-grown lambs’, the sorrow of the gnats, the wind that lives and dies, and the day that is dying and getting dark. As all we know, the next season is winter, a part of the year that represents aging and death, in other words, the end of life. However, in my opinion, death does not have a negative connotation because Keats enjoys and accepts ‘autumn’ or maturity

| Posted on 2008-02-14 | by a guest




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