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To Lucasta, Going To The Wars Analysis



Author: poem of Richard Lovelace Type: poem Views: 5


Tell me not, Sweet, I am unkind,
That from the nunnery
Of thy chaste breasts, and quiet mind,
To war and arms I fly.

True, a new mistress now I chase,
The first foe in the field;
And with a stronger faith embrace
A sword, a horse, a shield.

Yet this inconstancy is such,
As you too shall adore;
I could not love thee, Dear, so much,
Loved I not honour more.

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




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the poet seems to be enthusiastic for living an honourable life perhaps that is why he is afraid of being called unkind....no one has thought about this point.

| Posted on 2013-06-12 | by a guest


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Sammmbbodiiie nnneeeds too haaaalp mmmeeeeyyyuuu Hi

| Posted on 2012-02-08 | by a guest


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\"Elite\" skills my ass. If you\'re reading this, save yourself the hassle of reading any further and just go to a different site.

| Posted on 2011-12-08 | by a guest


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Richard Lovelace is well known for his love poems and by no means is this written due to him being bored with his mistress. This poem was written in the sense of a man leaving for war… and proclaiming to his mistress that he will have a temporary new love (being a soldier) ..Richard is proclaiming to his mistress that he still loves her but he must depart to a new mistress temporarily (war).

| Posted on 2011-11-05 | by a guest


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This poem actually isn\'t about a man breaking it off with a woman. He is just saying that he needs to go to war and love the honor and he needs to put her on hold for a minute. But he still loves her.

| Posted on 2011-01-25 | by a guest


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this poem is about a man leaving his mistress for war. he explains how she isnt satisfying enough for him, so hes going to go do what he wants. and that is war. nice try for everyone else that doesnt even know what their reading. go back to high school!

| Posted on 2010-11-01 | by a guest


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In order to love, in the greatest,noblest and purist sense, one must possess traits that form his (her) CHARACTER. He (she) must be honest, selfless, compassionate, faithful, courageous---things that define the individual as honorable. In order to not compromise these characteristics for his own comfort and desire,the soldier risks his life and love to \"do the right thing \". To do less would deminish himself and therefore his abilty to love. DJG 8/17/10

| Posted on 2010-08-17 | by a guest


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One guest wrote:
no one knows for sure what the author meant in this poem, so anyone's analysis can be correct.
This is a cop-out. While it is true that differing analyses can hold weight, they do so by providing compelling evidence or supporting arguments. You are simply being lazy.
Another guest wrote that the author misspelled "honour." Not so. The English (heritage of our author) spell honor, color and a few similar words with "...our."

| Posted on 2010-06-28 | by a guest


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to any sfx students reading this,
scroll ya ass down to the one that analyses the poem line for line, i swear its just the way the teacher does it in class. so good.and so correct. i think:)

| Posted on 2010-05-04 | by a guest


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I think that this poem by Richard Lovelace means that he prefers honor more than Lucasta. Now Lucasta was a real women that was Richard Lovelace's life, her name was Lucy Sacherevell. And I believe he wrote it because she got married to another men after he died because of a battle. Maybe this women was to pure for him and he wanted more excitement in his life. He is basicaly implying that war is his new mistress, that it has taken Lucastas place in his heart. That is what i think he means. And people please check your spelling, if are over 18 then you have a problem because that's a little embarrassing. I hope this helps somebody. :) -JM

| Posted on 2010-04-25 | by a guest


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I think that this poemby Richard Lovelace means that he prefers honor more than Lucasta. Now Lucasta was a real women that was Richard Lovelace's life, her name was Lucy Sacherevell. And I believe he wrote it because she got married to another men after he died because of a battle. Maybe this women was to pure for him and he wanted more excitement in his life. He is basicaly implying that war is his new mistress, that it has taken Lucastas place in his heart. That is what i think he means. And people please check your spelling, if are over 18 then you have a problem because that's a little embarrassing. :) -JM

| Posted on 2010-04-25 | by a guest


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I think it should be remembered the time frame of this poem - written in a time when honour was so vital and necessary and to behave in an honourable fashion the mark of a man. Thus, although he loves the women in his life, the person that he is - the fundamentals that make him the person she loves - is an honourable man. And because he is this honourable person how could he not fight, to not do so would contradict and in turn imply that their love is based on something false.

| Posted on 2010-03-29 | by a guest


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no one knows for sure what the author meant in this poem, so anyone's analysis can be correct

| Posted on 2010-02-16 | by a guest


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TELL me not (Sweet) I am unkinde,
*This line is in regards to his love not to think of him as being thoughtless and uncaring.
That from the Nunnerie
Of thy chaste breast, and quiet minde,
*These lines refers to how he thinks of his love as being innocent, pure, serene, someone to whom he thinks of as a sanctuary.
To Warre and Armes I flie.
*Here he indicates that he is rushing to battle, to war and conflict very different from the calm soothing sanctuary of his love.
True ; a new Mistresse now I chase,
*Now he is indicating that he is pursuing something, something that he feels passionate about.
The first Foe in the Field ;
*At this point he is comparing the madness of love with the madness of battle.
And with a stronger Faith imbrace
A Sword, a Horse, a Shield.
*Here he is indicating that he feels that the tools of war, the weapons are what he is now placing his faith in his believe in rather then in love.
Yet this Inconstancy is such,
As you too shall adore ;
I could not love thee (Deare) so much,
Lov'd I not Honour more.
*At this point he is saying that his love could not love him unless he put honour, valour, righteousness above his own personal feelings. He is saying he would not be worthy of her love nor the person he/she loves if he did not believe in sacrifice for the greater good.

| Posted on 2009-12-29 | by a guest


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sweetie, honour is supposed to be spelled that way in this poem. That is the way richard lovelace wrote the poem. In England, it is more common to spell it this way as opposed to 'honor', which is, shall i say, an American way of spelling it.

| Posted on 2009-12-20 | by a guest


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they spelt honor wrong in the last line of the last stanza

| Posted on 2009-12-14 | by a guest


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well, this is a dumb site.
almost all of the messages posted here have a typographical error.
weird site and typers. :P

| Posted on 2009-12-07 | by a guest


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the line "true, a new mistress now i chase" from richard loveliness. he mean that he love so much lucasta but then, going to war is more painfull way to leave lucasta alone and he used the line new mistrees to express what he felt for leaving his beloved.

| Posted on 2009-11-25 | by a guest


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the line "true, a new mistress now i chase" from richard loveliness. he mean that he love so much lucasta but then, going to war is more painfull way to leave lucasta alone and he used the line new mistrees to express what he felt for leaving his beloved.

| Posted on 2009-11-25 | by a guest


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This webiste have both positive and negative reviews, i personally things i pretty good,
Connie

| Posted on 2009-11-17 | by a guest


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Whoever A is that ATTEMPTED to leave an analysis on this poem in january 2009 don;t analyze anything any more. you have the whole thing wrong.

| Posted on 2009-11-03 | by a guest


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you, know.. in literature..let me tell you evry thng which is sharp or pointed in sahpe.. it only symbolizes as smthng "you knw" a boy thng ..haha lol, ahhmm.. this poem is actually describing a sex interorse, aha.. yuh.. as you noticed the horse.. horse is the movement.. mistrss is the woman hvng sex with..war is the sex. nunnery is being innocent.. just do realize the poem it's about sex aha..oppZzz:p

| Posted on 2009-10-07 | by a guest


.: :.

you, know.. in literature..let me tell you evry thng which is sharp or pointed in sahpe.. it only symbolizes as smthng "you knw" a boy thng ..haha lol, ahhmm.. this poem is actually describing a sex interorse, aha.. yuh.. as you noticed the horse.. horse is the movement.. mistrss is the woman hvng sex with..war is the sex. nunnery is being innocent.. just do realize the poem it's about sex aha..oppZzz:p

| Posted on 2009-10-07 | by a guest


.: :.

you, know.. in literature..let me tell you evry thng which is sharp or pointed in sahpe.. it only symbolizes as smthng "you knw" a boy thng ..haha lol, ahhmm.. this poem is actually describing a sex interorse, aha.. yuh.. as you noticed the horse.. horse is the movement.. mistrss is the woman hvng sex with..war is the sex. nunnery is being innocent.. just do realize the poem it's about sex aha..oppZzz:p

| Posted on 2009-10-07 | by a guest


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The speaker above hit the nail on the head, I think. I'm pretty sure his new mistress is supposed to be honor, but there's a double meaning as well. He's complimenting Lucasta, saying that he loves her because he loves honor, and she is honorable. Likewise, his honor dictates that he has to fight for his country.

| Posted on 2009-10-01 | by a guest


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Geez...i'm tryin to understand the freakin annoying poem here.. and everyone has a different explanation.
omg. i come here to understand, NOt to freakin read all these and figure it out myself.
please someone. just freakin give us the coreect analysis for godsake. i'll realy appreciate it thank you

| Posted on 2009-08-25 | by a guest


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There is a conflict between love and honor (the speaker is touring but he chooses honor giving it priority. The poem is based on paradoxes: how he is leaving his beloved and claim that he is faithful? The paradox is resolved in the poem. There is a blending between words pertaining to war and words pertaining to love (using love terms and applying them to war). This is a play on words= Pun new mistress. First foe he meets in the field. He admits that he is leaving her to chase another mistress.
Embracing: is used here for weapons. The speaker appears very courageous in the battle field, in 2nd stanza (first foe: he will run after the first enemy he sees and defeat him). This meaning is emphasized by throwing alliteration “first, foe, field”= this shows his bravery for fighting for the king cause before going, he explains for his beloved why is he leaving? The lover appears to be faithful in first stanza. Directly he addresses her to not accuse him that he is unkind and unfaithful b/c. I am leaving you to go to war. The lady for him is so great, true, chaste and of a great value. Nunnery is a metaphor; mind and breast are a metonymy of her. Quiet= pure. Nunnery is a quiet place where we find chaste people. In the last line of the 1st stanza, he also shows his courage. He doesn’t go dragging himself to war but flying. Chase, embrace = metaphors the first 2 stanzas present the situation.
The 3rd stanza = conclusion. I love this inconstancy and you should love it. The speaker said that the lady should love an honorable man). The speaker appears a good lover but call to duty as more important for him = conflict between the two ideas of love and honor. The whole poem is an apostrophe: the speaker addresses his beloved to present the situation.

| Posted on 2009-05-29 | by a guest


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Holy hell the first person to post on this thing is a dumbass.

| Posted on 2009-05-03 | by a guest


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well, i believe lucasta right is potraying a view of honour and war right, he glorifies war right, therdfore honouring right, to be fair right, lucasta right is potraying how war is right glorifccation right, well what can i say right, its about honour right, and glorification right, therefore glorifcation right, well right, on the whole right, i based my essay on theme i wrote above right, about glorifcation and honour righjt in my summary of the poem right, any1 else agree right?

| Posted on 2009-04-29 | by a guest


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I don't agree. Neither honor nor Lucasta are his mistress. I strongly suspect he's talking about the first foe in the field. Think about it. You'll get it.

| Posted on 2009-04-14 | by a guest


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In his bittersweet poem “To Lucasta,” Lovelace manages to relay to the reader the terrible contrast between love and war through diction. Lovelace first does this by introducing the theme of love using only positive diction. For example, he calls his mistress “Sweet” which is, in my opinion, one of the most loving names one could call someone. This shows that he is affectionate with his mistress. In the second line, he describes the “nunnery of thy chaste breast and quiet mind” in which he has been sheltered and nurtured. Here, the adjectives chaste and quiet illustrate the innocence, purity, and incorruptness of the narrator’s mistress.
In the next line the narrator introduces the theme of war but it is not until the following stanza that the narrator’s diction provides the sharp contrast between the initial theme of love and the ending theme of war. In the first line of the second stanza the narrator announces, “a new mistress now I chase.” This is said in such a way, using the word “mistress”, which is commonly used to refer to one’s lover, that Lovelace fools the reader into believing that he is being unfaithful to his current mistress. However, in the following line, he clarifies his previous statement by articulating that his new mistress will be his first victim of war. The third line of the second stanza is my favorite yet because the narrator’s diction plays off of his previous diction; he says that “with a stronger faith embrace a sword, a horse, a shield.” “Faith plays off of “chaste” and “embrace” plays off of “nunnery”. In this way, Lovelace contrasts the warm atmosphere of his mistress’ nunnery with the harshness of war.
In the third and final quatrain, Lovelace acknowledges his infidelity (“inconstancy”) and ends the poem simply by conceding that he can only love his mistress because of his greater love for honor. Though it may seem a bit harsh, the narrator pauses his final thought to clarify that he does not mean to be; he calls his mistress “Dear.” Overall, the diction throughout the poem reinforces both the positive and negative in the poem, love and war.

| Posted on 2009-01-20 | by a guest


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honor IS his "new mistress," not an actual person

| Posted on 2009-01-19 | by a guest


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Richard Lovelace’s poem, “To Lucasta, Going to the Wars”, is about a soldier untroubled about his love that he left at home because of his new mistress at battle. The soldier is selfish and cares more about what he wants, than the mistress waiting for him at home. The soldier only cares about what he lusts for, so with time spent away from home he loses his loyalty and chases a new girl.
-A

| Posted on 2009-01-16 | by a guest


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this is probably the most uninventive, unhelpful and boring website that i have ever set my eyes upon. to be honest this is another 3 minutes wasted of my life. i hope that you understand the reprcussions on which you have set upon this poor unfortunate manchild. Good day to you sir.

| Posted on 2009-01-12 | by a guest


.: :.

this is probably the most uninventive, unhelpful and boring website that i have ever set my eyes upon. to be honest this is another 3 minutes wasted of my life. i hope that you understand the reprcussions on which you have set upon this poor unfortunate manchild. Good day to you sir.

| Posted on 2009-01-12 | by a guest


.: :.

this is probably the most uninventive, unhelpful and boring website that i have ever set my eyes upon. to be honest this is another 3 minutes wasted of my life. i hope that you understand the reprcussions on which you have set upon this poor unfortunate manchild. Good day to you sir.

| Posted on 2009-01-12 | by a guest


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The speaker is able to love this woman more because it is his greater honor that let him be able to go to war and leave her behind

| Posted on 2008-03-09 | by a guest




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