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To My Brothers Analysis



Author: poem of John Keats Type: poem Views: 9


Small, busy flames play through the fresh-laid coals,
And their faint cracklings o'er our silence creep
Like whispers of the household gods that keep
A gentle empire o'er fraternal souls.
And while for rhymes I search around the poles,
Your eyes are fixed, as in poetic sleep,
Upon the lore so voluble and deep,
That aye at fall of night our care condoles.
This is your birthday, Tom, and I rejoice
That thus it passes smoothly, quietly:
Many such eves of gently whispering noise
May we together pass, and calmly try
What are this world's true joys,—ere the great Voice
From its fair face shall bid our spirits fly.

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




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The "impermanence" of life is what makes it worth living .. if there was all joy and no sororw, we could not enjoy it. The different between living and existing is ..indeed .. the impermanence, for therein lies our equality.Oh gee .. yes, this was thought provoking. x x

| Posted on 2014-03-06 | by a guest


.: :.

I like this, it set me to thinking right away. First, yes, wodlun't it be terrible to exist meaninglessly?And then, now what? Well, if we are only passing through then we have to come out. Great. (I know, I don't often think straight but I do think.)..

| Posted on 2014-03-05 | by a guest


.: :.

This is so true, so deep, so real. It reminds me of seavrel of my favorite things, such as a novella turned novel "Against the Fall of Night"/"The City and the Stars" by Arthur C. Clark in which the lengthening of the human lifespan to thousands of years nearly kills the creative spirit of mankind.

| Posted on 2014-03-04 | by a guest


.: :.

what a nice gift, a wonderful poem, to give yoresulf. . . Helen Keller wrote we could never learn to be brave and patient if there were only joy in the world. I guess the polar opposite to life's impermanence would be boundless indifference. . . we have this need to make beauty now, for now, may be all we ever have.I enjoy your poetry. Thank you for giving me the chance to read it.

| Posted on 2014-03-04 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem was written two years before his brother Tom died...Fail analysis

| Posted on 2010-11-08 | by a guest


.: :.

"To my brothers" is a moment being relived before Keats - his brother's death. The contrasts between life and death depicted in the poem (fire and fresh-laid coals) and a constant reference to the death of his brother demonstrates Keats' obsession with his own death, and the death of those around him, whilst also contemplating the innocence and beauty of life.

| Posted on 2008-08-31 | by a guest




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