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Whoso List to Hunt, I Know Where is an Hind Analysis



Author: Poetry of Sir Thomas Wyatt Type: Poetry Views: 2094



Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind,
But as for me, hélas, I may no more.
The vain travail hath wearied me so sore,
I am of them that farthest cometh behind.
Yet may I by no means my wearied mind
Draw from the deer, but as she fleeth afore
Fainting I follow. I leave off therefore,
Sithens in a net I seek to hold the wind.
Who list her hunt, I put him out of doubt,
As well as I may spend his time in vain.
And graven with diamonds in letters plain
There is written, her fair neck round about:
Noli me tangere, for Caesar's I am,
And wild for to hold, though I seem tame.

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




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Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind,
But as for me, hélas, I may no more.
The vain travail hath wearied me so sore,
I am of them that farthest cometh behind.
Yet may I by no means my wearied mind
Draw from the deer, but as she fleeth afore
Fainting I follow. I leave off therefore,
Sithens in a net I seek to hold the wind.
Who list her hunt, I put him out of doubt,
As well as I may spend his time in vain.
And graven with diamonds in letters plain
There is written, her fair neck round about:
Noli me tangere, for Caesar\'s I am,
And wild for to hold, though I seem tame.

| Posted on 2012-11-13 | by a guest


.: :.

A Complete Interpretation (New Criticism Approach)
By: H. Khurram, Herat University, Afghanistan, 2011
“Whoso list to hunt” powerfully exemplifies the artistic skills of Sir Thomas Wyatt in Sonnet, which decorated with deep emotions and initiate use of literary devices. To England sonnet was introduced by Wyatt who was a diplomat in Italy, the birth place of sonnet and renascence, for some time. Sonnet during 13 to 16 century was the best and appropriate form of poetry at first for love subject; later for variety of subjects even nature in romantic period. Wyatt was in love with a woman by the name of Anne Boleyn, but the king of the time, Henry VIII, defeated him and won her before him. Thereafter he realized that he can’t do anything about it because his opponent was the king. Later it is said she had done adultery with Wyatt; the king imprisoned Wyatt beheading Anne Boleyn. In this sonnet Wyatt with a very deep sorrow express his pure love toward Anne, and how all the rumors about her were nothing, but calumny.
The form of this sonnet is petrarchan with rhyme scheme (ABBA-ABBA-CDDC -EE). Wyatt used Petrarchan sonnet form sometimes with a slight change in its rhyme scheme, he divided sonnet into three four lines stanzas and two last lines, 13th and 14thl lines, as couplet. The meter of this sonnet is iambic pentameter. The word choice, imaginary language, end-jumpment, grammatical disorder techniques, alliteration that makes the sonnet more musical, and metaphors that are used in this sonnet, make it more expressive and rich. The poet utilized first person point of view, using the pronouns I and me. It has three major themes power and weakness, or ruler and subjects; unreachable goal; unreachable love. In power and weakness the theme is about how the king can do and have whatever he wants and the subjects should obey without any complain. The next theme, unreachable goal, points out how man struggle to get to something unreachable although he knows he can’t. The third theme, unreachable love, shows the speaker is in love with a lady which is in king possession. The tone of this work is hopelessness.
The title is repeated in the very first line of the sonnet like a clause of a long sentence, and the rest of the sonnet serves as complement. It is an exposition question means “Whoever desires to hunt” it really hooks the reader mind to see what the answer is. The word “whoso” means whoever; “list” means desire, want, need; “Hunt” means chase, pursuit, and search.
In the first line 1 Wyatt introduces the reader to a metaphors used for the intended women, and hunt for wanting her. “Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind” means whoever desires to hunt, I know a female deer. The hind here metaphorically refers to a lady. The words hind, doe, and gazelle in western literature metaphorically refer to beautiful women. These metaphors in the first line serve as the chief metaphors in the sonnet; the subject discuss around this subject until the end. The first line contains alliteration, too (whoso, hunt, hind). In line 2-3 the speaker describes himself as a hunter moaning his tiredness caused by vain attempt to hunt the deer. Line 2 and 3 also employ alliteration (me, may, more) and (so, sore). “But as for me, alas, I may no more:” “the vain travail hath wearied me so sore.” He says that he feels so sorry, for all his attempt were in vain to win her love and be united with her; now he is so wearied and sore( Haim Dictionary sore can be used for mental tiredness, too). The pronoun “them” in line 4 refers to the other hunters, men who were trying to win the lady’s love. Lines 4-6 the speaker notes that although he fall behind than other hunters, he can’t take her out of his mind, and she eludes to be caught by the hunters. “Fleet afore” means escaping, running away far ahead. The lady running away from her lovers shows chasteness of her and how she isn’t interested in them. Again in line 5 and 6 again alliteration is noticeable (may, means, my, mind).In line 7 he says since the deer runs ahead, he is losing hope to get to her (fainting, follow) is alliteration, “fainting” means hopeless, not intense. In the second half of line 7 he says he gives up because (Line 8) he realizes that all his struggles are in vain giving a proverb as an example, catching wind with a net; This metaphor illustrate the themes of the sonnet . In (line 9) another alliteration is visible (whoso, her, hunt). (Line 9) “Put some one out of doubt” means assure, guarantee. (Line 9-10) The speaker says the one who is trying to hunt the deer; I assure him his efforts will be in vain just like his. (Line 11) “Graven” means carved; “diamonds” diamonds are hard, bright precious stones. It is carved with diamond clearly, or frankly. (Line 12) means there around her beautiful neck it is written, visible to every one. (Line 13) the poet used here an allusion in Latin taken from the bible. “Noli me tangere” in English means “don’t touch me” it is a warning; like stay away from me. (Line 14) the word “Wild” means free, and rough showing she needed to be caught by a skillful strong hunter; “tame” means amenable. She says “you may fancy catching me since I seem tame, but in reality having me is impractical.” In this line employs a paradox “wild for to hold, though I seem to tame.” There is a contradiction between words wild and tame. This paradox illustrates the attitude of the lady toward her lovers and how she neglects them. It also provides answer to the problem raised in octave. Diamonds are symbols of asset, and wealth; it makes clear two things. First, the lady is king’s property and no one is allowed to covet her; second, the king is rich and already paid the price for her.
Sir Thomas Wyatt in “whoso list to hunt” a metaphorical sonnet using his extraordinary talent telling his life story, how men are trying to have a lady who doesn’t pay attention to them because she belongs to the king. Images, paradox, and alliterations all these make the sonnet more beautiful and musical. Any reader, by reading this sonnet, will sympathize with Wyatt and his unsuccessful and unreachable love.

| Posted on 2011-06-30 | by a guest


.: :.

The Theme of the poem : The central idea in this poem deals with unsuccessful love,which is made by one sided lover and which causes a great sadness in persons heart.
The poet uses the hind as a symbol to refer to his beloved and the hunter as a symbol to refer to himself.
The poem is an English poem,it is written in metaphorical language.
The poet chooses the hind because its so beautiful and hurried animal and no one can get her easily
the speaker in this poem talks about his beloved.
He compares his beloved to the hint and compares himself with the hunter.
The poet tells us that he tried to hunt his hint,but he had failed.
The poet says that he is ready to show to every hunter the place of the hind,but he is sure that none can hunt this hind because he had tried to hunt it before and he had failed.
He tells us that he has been like one who tries to hold the wind in a net.
At the end , the poet is content that no one will be able to hunt this hind because there is something written around her neck which says that no one can catch me because I am the kings own.

| Posted on 2011-02-23 | by a guest


.: :.

In the first lines Wyatt describes his love and that he suffers because of it.
In line 9f. he even warns the men who could also fall in love with Anne that this love will be “in vain” because she is the “property” of a rich man (there are not only letters around her neck which tell everyone that she is spoken for another man; the message is “graven with Diamonds”. Furthermore Wyatt expresses the high position of Anne`s “man” by calling him “Cesar” - and if you know the background story and look up who Sir Thomas Wyatt actually was, you will quickly find out that Henry VIII is meant.)
So you just get the whole poem when you get the parts of it and vice versa - the hermeneutic circle.
I don`t know if there`s something more to add, Anja, Verena and Jasmin did a great job and I think, I just sum it up a little bit.
Well, to just pick up what was said in the course: in my opinion you don`t have to analyse a poem with all its different features to interprete it. I mean, you even don`t notice that you analyse it a little bit by filtering out the metaphors that you often see immediately - there`s no need to say: first the analysis and than the interpretation. But maybe we are just well grounded in doing both together.
Okay, that`s it, have a nice weekend
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-27 | by a guest


.: :.

Sir Thomas Wyatt’s “Whoso list to hunt,” which is often described as a translation
of Petrarch’s Canzoniere 190, depicts a speaker informing his friends (or anyone within
earshot) that he knows where to find a deer if they are interested in hunting it. He declares
that he has exhausted himself in pursuit of this game, and suspects that any efforts to subdue
it will be futile, especially because the deer wears a necklace identifying her as the property
of Caesar, and indicating that she is wild, even though she seems tame. The poem is more
an adaptation than a translation of the Petrarch sonnet, and Wyatt’s changes
considerably amplify the tensions inherent in the traditional Petrarchan theme of the
unapproachable object of desire. In the Wyatt poem, the speaker reflects not only a
genuine desire for the deer, but a bewilderment at the difficulty involved in attaining
it, and a cynicism about the idea of the hunt altogether.
Wyatt’s poem, like Petrarch’s, uses the idea of the hunt as a metaphor for the poet’s
pursuit of an idealized object of amorous desire. But whereas the metaphor of the hunt is
diminished in Petrarch’s poem (the speaker contemplates the deer more than he actually
hunts her), Wyatt emphasizes the arduousness of the “vain travail” that makes him “so sore”
(3), and that leaves him with a “wearied mind” (5), and “fainting” (7). The cluster of words
related to work amplify Petrarch’s lavoro (6)—which he is actually leaving behind so he
can follow the deer—and they also balance the ways in which pursuit is both physically and
mentally demanding. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, “sore” included not only
the modern sense of sore muscles, but also “mental suffering . . . grief” (sb. 1.6). “Fainting”
also suggests not only physical exhaustion, but emotional exhaustion, or the swoon of a
romantic lover such as Chaucer’s Troilus (the OED indicates that this would have been the
primary meaning in Tudor England). Wyatt thus makes the poem more physical and more
introspective at the same time. He has combined the reality of the courtly hunt with the
inner struggles of courtly love in a way that exposes the realities and dangers involved in
both.
Wyatt also transforms Petrarch’s virtuous and chaste deer into a more ethically
ambiguous creature. Whereas Petrarch’s speaker contemplates a “white doe,” Wyatt’s
speaker contemplates only a “hind.” In Petrarch’s Italian “white” is “candida,” a word that
has strong connotations of purity and innocence, as in one of the more archaic meanings of
the English cognate “candid” (OED 2.b). The sign around the doe’s neck is encrusted only
with diamonds (suggesting eternal beauty, but also steadfastness and coldness), not topazes
3[Source: Dictionary of Symbols?]
(a common symbol for chastity in Renaissance art),3 as in Petrarch. The deer in Wyatt’s
poem is not viewed as an object of virtue, but simply as an unattainable object of desire.
Because the deer is not idealized, and because she is probably not chaste, the tension
between the speaker and the object of desire is increased: he cannot have her, but not
because of her virtue. It is, instead, Caesar that stands in his way. Caesar in Wyatt’s poem
is probably not God, as in Petrarch’s version, but a king in the temporal world—perhaps
Henry VIII, if the common belief that the doe represents Anne Boleyn, with whom Wyatt
is supposed to have had an affair, is correct. Regardless of the poem’s historical
background, Wyatt’s failure to idealize the doe results in a cynicism about the realities of
court life: The lover is not contending with God for the doe, but with his fellow courtiers,
and with his king, and this results in a more immediate, and more physically dangerous set
of consequences for the speaker.
Although Caesar is an obstacle to the speaker’s pursuit of the doe, the doe presents
dangers of her own. The extent to which the warning spelled out at the end of the poem
comes from Caesar or from the doe is unclear: “Noli me tangere, for Caesar’s I am / And
wild for to hold, though I seem tame” (13-14). The lack of punctuation in the manuscript
version of the poem makes it unclear where the quotation marks should be put. Are both
lines on the necklace, or only the Latin tag? Is the second line a warning coming from the
doe herself? A great amount of weight rests on the penultimate word: “seme.” Is she wild,
or tame, or both? The problem is not only that the speaker cannot have her, but that he
cannot know what her own desires are.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-27 | by a guest


.: :.

You know the lady
in Wyatt’s poem might actually love him in return, but cannot act on it, or will not act on
it.
Wyatt offers us, then, not the dream vision of Petrarch, but a dramatic realization
of the futility of pursuing a love object at court: “sethens in a nett I seke to hold the wynde”
(8). The image may refer to the speaker’s inability to catch the deer—he ends up with only
wind in his net. But the force of “I seke” also suggests a continued effort of vain
pursuit—he is doggedly chasing not the deer, but the wind, because experience has shown
him that they are equally impossible to catch. Why does the speaker continue the hunt?
Why doesn’t he just put the net away? In the middle of the poem the speaker indicates that
he wants to “leve of” (“leave off”) (7), or not participate in the hunt any longer, but the rest
of the poem continues the speaker’s contemplation of the deer and the futility of pursing her.
As a courtier, leaving the court, and leaving the pursuit is perhaps not an option. He must
remain, and continue to engage in activities that he is beginning to view not only as futile
and unsatisfying, but dangerous. Ultimately, the poem serves as a message of counsel to his
fellow courtiers. If he cannot leave this dangerous environment, he can at least warn others
about the dangers he perceives there.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-27 | by a guest


.: :.

I just tried to find out what the poem “Who so list to hounte: I know where is an hynde” by Sir Thomas Wyatt is about and came up with some ideas but I haven´t solved the “problem” completely yet.
Hounte means hunt, to go and shoot animals down and hynde is a hide, the thing hunters sit on to see the animals. So the first line means something like: For those who like hunting I can tell you where to find a hide.
The speaker says in the next verse that he doesn´t want to go hunting anymore, because that useless work worries him (line 3).
In the next line he might state that he is one of the best hunters but I am not really sure about that.
In the middle of the poems are two lines I don´t quite understand.
“…but as she fleeth afore
faynting I folowe. I leve of therefore:”
They could either mean that the deer fled before fainting or that he followed it dazed.
In the second half of the poem the speaker addresses the other people who like to hunt. He tells them that they might feel like him and will find something written in diamonds on the neck of the dear which says: Don´t touch me (Latin: noli me tangere)because I belong to the King (Cesar = King ) and although I seem tame I am too wild to be caught.
I am curious to read your ideas about the poem.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-27 | by a guest


.: :.

The following interpretation deals with Sir Thomas Wyatt’s well-known Sonnet Whoso List to Hunt, I Know Where is An Hind. It was written after 1500 and therefore belongs to the modern English time. Wyatt is being recognized for making the Sonnet popular in England. The English sonnet contains of14 lines. There are three stanzas of four lines and one rhyming couplet of two lines in the end. Whoso List to hunt? I Know Where is An Hind is a translation of an Italian sonnet by Petrarch. Furthermore Sir Thomas Wyatt was known for his feelings for Anna Boleyn the wife of Henry VIII.
The sonnet starts by having the narrator state that for those who wish to hunt, he knows of a hind, a female deer (l.1). This is being followed by him uttering that he gives up the hunt knowing that the hind is beyond his reach (l.2). The words “vain travail” and “wearied” indicate how exhausted he has become through the useless work his hunt turned out to be. He recognizes the pointlessness of his pursuit to capture the female deer which most likely represents Anne Boleyn, the narrator’s woman of desire who cannot be reached. In the forth line he utters “I am of them that farthest cometh behind” and declares that he is the last one to try to pursuit. Furthermore there is a similarity of spelling concerning the words “deer” and “dear” meaning “the lovely one”. The playing of the word “dear” indicates that he admires the female dear and that by the dear a beloved is meant.
In line 5, 6 and 7 the narrator declares that he cannot take his mind from the dear even though his mind is “wearied” (l.5). His exhaustion is being displayed. As she flees he claims to follow her fainting but still knows that he has to give up the chase. The female deer, Anne, is already claimed by Caesar, who portraits Henry VIII. Therefore his chances are as hopeless as it is to “seek to hold the wind in a net” (l.8).
In the lines 9 and 10, which form the beginning of the third stanza, the narrator states that like himself other hunter will also end in hopelessness and vain. This is because he knows that engraved in diamonds, which are lying around the neck of the beloved, it says “Noli me tangere” (l.13). It means “don’t touch me I belong to Caesar”. Caesar again being meant to be Anne’s husband Henry VIII.
Therefore his hopeless hunt is being explained in the rhyming couplet. The couplet serves as a conclusion. Moreover it claims that the desired dreads the chain and cannot be hold even though she seems to be tame.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-27 | by a guest


.: :.

Sir Thomas Wyatt is a writer of the poem Whoso list hunt, I know where is an Hind. This is one of his thirty sonnets, which he never published, but which appeared in the 1557 edition, after his death. Whoso list to hunt is a fourteen-line sonnet with a rhyme scheme and is considered to be Wyatt’s recreation of Rime 190 written by Patriarch, who was a poet and scholar from Italy lived in fourteenth-century. We can imagine that Wyatt chose Patrarchan sonnet as his inspiration to create something available and readable to the aristocratic circle around during the Elizabethan time.
As some of you have been already mentioned Wyatt speaks directly about a hunt wherein a deer is pursued and ultimately possessed by the royal who is the owner of the land. We can believe that the poem is an allegory with reference to Anne Boleyn who is going to be a future wife of King Henry VIII . Through his imagination he describes a deer who belongs to the royal property and can not be hunted by others and first of all not by him. Wyatt wrote his poem in the time when he was estranged from his own wife maybe because of his love to Anne Boleyn. In the poem he seems to be very exhausted and resigned in his unrequited feelings to Anne Boleyn. He accepts that she has become the ownership of the king along.
I think this poem is a demonstration of one man’s unfulfilled love to one woman.
Written By : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-27 | by a guest


.: :.

Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind
Whoso list to hunt essentially means ‘whoever wishes’ to hunt. The hind, or deer, of the hunt is an obvious reference to Anne Boleyn. The pursuit of her has wearied our poet to the point that he seems to have had enough, and, because so many other suitors seem ahead of him on the chase (particularly Henry himself), he seems to give it up:
But as for me, hélas, I may no more.
The vain travail hath wearied me so sore,
I am of them that farthest cometh behind.
and
... as she fleeth afore / Fainting I follow. I leave off therefore ...
Wyatt also seems to warn other suitors of the futility of the hunt:
Who list her hunt, I put him out of doubt,
As well as I may spend his time in vain.
However, and most important, was the danger of pursuing her at all. The poet elaborates on a diamond necklace worn by the deer.
And graven with diamonds in letters plain
There is written, her fair neck round about:
Noli me tangere, for Caesar's I am,
And wild for to hold, though I seem tame.
Inscribed on it was a phase (or rather warning): Noli me tangere, for Caesar's I am. Noli me tangere is Latin for “touch me not” (the exact same phrase employed by the Vulgate when a resurrected Christ warned Mary that he had not yet ascended to the father- John 20:17). Clearly Caesar is king Henry VIII, hence the warning: Do Not Touch - Property of the King.
The warning went unheard. Eventually several men (along with our poet and Anne herself) were arrested and charged with adultery- some with treason! Wyatt escaped judgment, but others suffered a grisly execution, as did Queen Anne.
I read this poem a while ago and instantly liked it- especially after having learned a little bit about the poem's background, and more so about the poet himself.
Hope you enjoy it as well.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-27 | by a guest


.: :.

Indeed, "Whoso List to Hunt" is a text in which the reader is meant to identify with the male hunter. However, to argue that there is no feminine identity ignores the implied presence of Anne Boleyn, whose story can be understood as a clear warning of the dangers that result when women are appropriated as property by rich and powerful males. Waller claims that the hunt "casts the poet in the role of aristocratic hunter and the beloved in the role of an animal to be hunted" as well as that the "poet's superior social status and the inferior status of the woman" are not challenged. But again, Waller is discounting historical reality. In sixteenth-century England, women were judged to be inferior — even women such as Anne Boleyn, who perhaps had more notoriety than most. Although women readers should acknowledge Wyatt's trivialization of the feminine, the poem still stands as a historical and cultural representation of the way in which courtship and politics could be intermingled by the poet. Henry's court, of which Wyatt was a member, would not have separated love from politics.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-07-27 | by a guest


.: :.

The speaker in this poem talks about his beloved.
He compares his beloved to the hint and compares himself with the hunter.
The poet tells us that he tried to hunt his hint,but he had failed.
The poet says that he is ready to show to every hunter the place of the hind,but he is sure that none can hunt this hind because he had tried to hunt it before and he had failed.
He tells us that he has been like one who tries to hold the wind in a net.
At the end , the poet is content that no one will be able to hunt this hind because there is something written around her neck which says that no one can catch me because I am the kings own.
He expresses his a morous joys and pains with the feeling of a full blooded man.
He pleads with passion without being weak or soft before a disdainful mistress.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-05-25 | by a guest


.: :.

The Theme of the poem : The central idea in this poem deals with unsuccessful love,which is made by one sided lover and which causes a great sadness in persons heart.
The poet uses the hind as a symbol to refer to his beloved and the hunter as a symbol to refer to himself.
The poem is an English poem,it is written in metaphorical language.
The poet chooses the hind because its so beautiful and hurried animal and no one can get her easily.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-05-25 | by a guest


.: :.

the speaker in this poem talks about his beloved.
He compares his beloved to the hint and compares himself with the hunter.
The poet tells us that he tried to hunt his hint,but he had failed.
The poet says that he is ready to show to every hunter the place of the hind,but he is sure that none can hunt this hind because he had tried to hunt it before and he had failed.
He tells us that he has been like one who tries to hold the wind in a net.
At the end , the poet is content that no one will be able to hunt this hind because there is something written around her neck which says that no one can catch me because I am the kings own.
Written by : Cali4nia x

| Posted on 2009-05-25 | by a guest




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