famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

Holy Sonnet X: Death Be Not Proud Analysis



Author: Poetry of John Donne Type: Poetry Views: 7634

Sponsored Links

Death, be not proud, though some have callèd thee

Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;

For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow

Die not, poor death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

From rest and sleep, which yet thy pictures be,

Much pleasure, then from thee much more, must low

And soonest our best men with thee do go,

Rest of their bones and soul's delivery.

Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings and desperate men

And dost with poison, war and sickness dwell,

And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well

And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then ?

One short sleep past, we wake eternally,

And death shall be no more; death, thou shalt die.






Sponsor



Learn to Play Songs by Ear: Ear Training

122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

we built this city!
we built this city!
we built this city on rock and roll..!!

| Posted on 2010-09-05 | by a guest


.: :.

John Donne’s diction, detail, point of view, metaphysical format, and tone used in “Holy Sonnet 10” convey both a feeling of cynical and domination, and also a sense of mockery of death. The effects on the reader include assurance and confidence in facing death.
The author’s diction makes the reader feel that death can be defeated. For example, death has been called “mighty and dreadful” but the author shows that it is not more than a “short sleep” where men go for the “rest of their bones.” The general idea of death is frightful and scary, but the reader is told that it’s only a short phase everyone goes through. It’s an opportunity for men to separate their soul and physical body. In addition, if “poison, war, and sickness” can all make us “sleep,” then why does death “swell’st.” the author shows the reader that there are many things to cause death so it shouldn’t be so arrogant with pride. In the end, all will conquer death no matter how hard it tries.
The author’s details supply the reader with the clear concise idea of how death can be overcome. For instance, death “canst…kill me from rest and sleep” but we will “wake eternally.” Only in our dreams and nightmares can death defeat us, but in reality, we have won the war against death. Death will always have a place in the lives of men, but it will only serve as a reason to hide away the fears of dying. Furthermore, death is men’s “rest of their bones and soul’s delivery” to freedom but “poppy or charms” can do the same. The author is telling the reader here that it doesn’t take very much to free man’s soul from the imprisonment of his body. Going through this transition isn’t very significant since all of man will end up in heaven, so death shouldn’t be so proud.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-11-02 | by a guest


.: :.

Since one of Death Be Not Proud's main themes is that defeating death means accepting its inevitability, Gunther forces the reader to accept the same thing. When Johnny gets better midway through his illness, our hopes are raised, yet we know that he will die and must adjust to it accordingly. Likewise, Gunther says he knew, from a doctor's face, that Johnny would die when he drove up to Deerfield to see him after the discovery of the tumor. Courage is the acknowledgment and acceptance of an ordeal, and Johnny does this throughout his illness, as the reader is forced to. Furthermore, Gunther maintains a dignified memoir by not sensationalizing Johnny's story. He puts the bald facts out on the table and demystifies death—it is something that happens, and we must get used to it. The revelation also contains a bit of an irony that deploys throughout the memoir. We may as well be reading an obituary when we learn of Johnny's death and of the facts of his life, but by the end of the book we feel we know him as a real person, and such a miniscule announcement of his death does him little justice.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-11-02 | by a guest


.: :.

The Best Analysis :
In Death Be Not Proud, John faces an overwhelming adversary for anyone, let alone a teenager: death. The poem by John Donne that opens the memoir (Divine Meditation 10) is an attack on death, and, to an extent, John and his family do attack his tumor—through operations, diets, injections, and so on. But more than that, John seems to reach a placid acceptance of death while he fights it. He never tries to defy death, but, rather, he simply loves life too much to let it go. He twice exclaims, "But I have so much to do, and so little time," and the statement indicates not a fear of death but a desire to live. John even says at one point, in what seems to contradict his optimistic outlook, that the "worst thing is to worry too little" about death. The implication is that one must not agonize over these questions of death but accept them as a battle. And, for John, a battle it is: he endures surgery after surgery, physical debilitation, constant moves in and out of hospitals, and the loss of a normal adolescence, yet he rarely complains. When he does, it only shows the strength of his conviction to get well. Mostly, he keeps his fears to himself, not out of pride, but to spare others. Everyone who comes to know John finds him remarkably courageous and mature about his fate, one that he rarely acknowledges but seems to be aware of deep down. John, however, focuses on living his life—furiously keeping up with his lost schoolwork, crafting interesting science experiments, and maintaining contact with friends. While it may simply be good fortune that his life extended far past what the malignancy of his tumor normally would have permitted, one cannot read Death Be Not Proud and not feel that John's unwavering bravery may have had something to do with it.
Written by : Alaa Cali4nia Boy

| Posted on 2009-11-02 | by a guest


.: :.

thank you so much guys. all of you have helped me so much and together you have helped me write my english essay. you've also helped me appreciate this poem! i love it!
thanks again
Austraila xoxo

| Posted on 2009-09-19 | by a guest


.: :.

i like toilets i do i do
i like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i doi like toilets i do i do

| Posted on 2009-06-30 | by a guest


.: :.

In the poem "Death be not proud”, by John Donne, he gives personification to death. By making it appear human, he makes it less intimidating then it really is. In the opening lines, Donne says that even though people regard death as mighty and dreadful, its not so. He then says that rest and sleep, are images of death (because when you sleep it’s like dying temporarily). So if people enjoy rest and sleep so much, the for sure death which is the real thing is enjoyable. In his next line, “soonest our best men with thee do go”, Donne is saying that the good die young, almost as if death is a form of reward. This further stresses his point that death isn’t as bad as it may seem. Donne then makes a metaphor between a slave and death. He says death is a slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men. By comparing death to a slave, Donne diminishes deaths power considerably, as a slave has no power or control of his own. The lack of freedom that death has in choosing its victims takes away any reason to be fearful of it. The writer then further mocks death, by saying that opium and charms can also put people to sleep, so death has no reason to be proud of its ability to do so. In fact, opium and charms are even better at it then death itself. Donne then adds that dying is not the end, by saying, “After one short sleep past, we wake eternally”. Lastly, Donne says that “death, thou shalt die!”. By purposely leaving off in a paradox, its evident that the only thing that really dies is death itself, because when humans die it’s just the beginning of a eternal life, and also he gets the example of nazareth to the end of the poem by saying "we wake eternally".

| Posted on 2009-01-17 | by a guest


.: :.

ELI D_In the poem "Death be not proud”, by John Donne, he gives personification to death. By making it appear human, he makes it less intimidating then it really is. In the opening lines, Donne says that even though people regard death as mighty and dreadful, its not so. He then says that rest and sleep, are images of death (because when you sleep it’s like dying temporarily). So if people enjoy rest and sleep so much, the for sure death which is the real thing is enjoyable. In his next line, “soonest our best men with thee do go”, Donne is saying that the good die young, almost as if death is a form of reward. This further stresses his point that death isn’t as bad as it may seem. Donne then makes a metaphor between a slave and death. He says death is a slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men. By comparing death to a slave, Donne diminishes deaths power considerably, as a slave has no power or control of his own. The lack of freedom that death has in choosing its victims takes away any reason to be fearful of it. The writer then further mocks death, by saying that opium and charms can also put people to sleep, so death has no reason to be proud of its ability to do so. In fact, opium and charms are even better at it then death itself. Donne then adds that dying is not the end, by saying, “After one short sleep past, we wake eternally”. Lastly, Donne says that “death, thou shalt die!”. By purposely leaving off in a paradox, its evident that the only thing that really dies is death itself, because when humans die it’s just the beginning of a eternal life.

| Posted on 2008-12-04 | by a guest


.: Death Be Not Proud :.

The speaker here addresses himself to death when he says: "Death be not proud". He feels contempt towards death. He provokes death when he says: "Die not, poor death, nor yet canst though kill me". He feels that death cannot kill him because he believes it will be a liberation: "rest of their bones, and soul's delivery". He provokes death when he exposes the way it operates: "poison, war, sickness..." and that he believes that death doesn't exist and that it could be just a false concept. He doesn't believe in death but rather beleives in a continuation of life: "One short sleep past, we wake eternally". He provokes the concept of death when he concludes "death shall be no more" because death never existed because he says: "death, thou shalt die".

| Posted on 2008-04-04 | by a guest


.: Death Be Not Proud :.

The poem is about overcomming the seemingly insuperable barrriers of life, death, and after-life.
Death is nothing but a breath. Nothing but a breath seperates life and after-life. Life, death, soul, God, past, and the present are not insuperable barriers but just a comma or a pause which is portrayed in the last line of the sonnet.

| Posted on 2006-07-01 | by Approved Guest


.: :.

this poem is an attempt of john donne to show his contempt for death ."Death"-that dwells all around him.surrounding his life,killing his own family within years,and filling his own heart with fear,to this extent that that fear longs no more.when death chase some one to the extent of making one fear free, in the next step comes comtempt.according to the poet deat is of no special strenght or force.if death means sleep,other things ,like charms,and anesthetic medicines can better give us sound sleep,though for a shorter period than death can.
sec wat if death effects our families and good men of the world,death is nothing more,but a way that lead us towrds a better life-i-e eternal life.where death 'll die and it will b no more.
ending lines of the poem "death thou shalt die" shows poets hate and disgust for death and somewat satisfaction of his heart na dmind.through logic and reason he shows his future victory over death.

| Posted on 2006-02-24 | by Approved Guest


.: :.

The title is the main theme of the poem: that while death my “win the battle” so to speak it will ultimately lose the war. It is powerless to prevent a human memory from living on. In a broader context, the sin and death of humanity as a whole is powerless to prevent resurrection and redemption provided through Jesus Christ.

The predominate metaphor in the poem is death as just like a sleep—a sleep from which we will ultimately wake at the day of judgment. In fact Dunne taunts death by saying to him that he should not be proud for he can do nothing that humans don’t do naturally (sleep), even sleep is more powerful than death because death doesn’t control its self .

The biggest most important line in this entire poem are the final two. They read:

One short sleep past, we wake eternally,
And death shall be no more; death, thou shalt die.

The key to understanding these lies in their punctuation.

In the first line there are just commas between “Short sleep past” and “ we wake eternally” which symbolizes a flawless transition from life into death.

In the second line he really brings it home. The semicolon between “no more” and “death” is perhaps one of the most beautiful and most effective punctuations ever in the history of literature. With those two dots, Dunne sums up the entire poem. There is only a pause, a short breath, between life (Death shall be no more) and the life everlasting (Death thou shalt die)

One might ask the question of whether or not the narrator is trying to convince someone rhat death isn’t to be feared or convince himself as he dies. Either way Dunne explores one of the most fundamental mysteries of human life: the ending of it.

“The trouble with dying, I think, is that you only get to do it once”
--Brian from The Shadow Box by Michael Christopher

| Posted on 2006-02-14 | by Approved Guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

Holy Sonnet X: Death Be Not Proud Analysis John Donne critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Holy Sonnet X: Death Be Not Proud Analysis John Donne Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Holy Sonnet X: Death Be Not Proud Analysis John Donne itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education homework forum help



Poetry 79
Poetry 155
Poetry 86
Poetry 65
Poetry 36
Poetry 169
Poetry 79
Poetry 140
Poetry 167
Poetry 138
Poetry 215
Poetry 97
Poetry 50
Poetry 110
Poetry 17
Poetry 151
Poetry 39
Poetry 22
Poetry 4
Poetry 183