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Holy Thursday (Innocence) Analysis



Author: Poetry of William Blake Type: Poetry Views: 2283

Songs of Innocence1789Twas on a Holy Thursday their innocent faces clean

The children walking two & two in red & blue & green

Grey headed beadles walked before with wands as white as snow

Till into the high dome of Pauls they like Thames waters flowO what a multitude they seemed these flowers of London town

Seated in companies they sit with radiance all their own

The hum of multitudes was there but multitudes of lambs

Thousands of little boys & girls raising their innocent handsNow like a mighty wind they raise to heaven the voice of song

Or like harmonious thunderings the seats of heaven among

Beneath them sit the aged men wise guardians of the poor

Then cherish pity, lest you drive an angel from your door






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

I received my first personal loans when I was a teenager and it aided me very much. But, I require the auto loan once again.

| Posted on 2013-02-26 | by a guest


.: :.

WoW... Quite shocking that young guys overseas have such a terrible mouth on them... I\'m from south africa.. A girl... 1st year student at the university of pretoria... I did find the quote of fresh prince of belair funny though... It made me laugh during all the studying... Lol this isn\'t a Lord byron poem.. So let\'s all try to be civil about this \"serious\" issue.. All the way from s.a. Aphrodite01@webmail.co.za

| Posted on 2011-06-07 | by a guest


.: :.

par Théophile Gautier
Regardez les branches
Comme elles sont blanches,
Le soleil essuie
les saules en pleurs.
Et le ciel reflète
Dans la violette
Ses pures couleurs…
La mouche ouvre l’aile
Et la demoiselle
Aux prunelles d’or,
Au corset de guêpe
Dépliant son crêpe,
A repris l’essor.
L’eau gaiement babille,
Le goujon frétille
Un printemps encore !
Il neige des
Riant de la pluie

| Posted on 2011-02-15 | by a guest


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THE CORRUPTION OF INNOCENT YOU DUMB WITTED BASTARDS.

| Posted on 2010-10-10 | by a guest


.: :.

School to church walking shown through iambic pentameter.
o Like Thames; chartered innocence, natural pace.
The children walking two and two Noahs ark, they were saved.
multitudes of lambs compared to children; thousands of little boys and girls:
o Repetition of multitudes, biblical, un-Blake an.
Holy Thursday = 1st day in May:
o Children went to St Pauls charity schools (schools set up by the church)
 Ironic questioning of why they are needed acts of cruelty lead to them.
Religious authority.
 They are looked after for 1 day of the year, and paraded to show off care.
Ironic.
flowers of London possession of the flowers can be shown, compared to possession of the schools and therefore possession of the children in tem
o AUTHORITY
o Owned by the city.
Reference to angels in the final line:
o lest you drive an angel from your door
o Represented as a powerful force at the end multitude.
o They are getting louder.
They came a sound from heaven like a rushing mighty wind BIBLE.
o Almost identical to the quote; like a mighty wind they raise to heaven
Direct reference to Hebrew ideas of showing charity to all in case one is an angel (Hebrew 13:2).
o Cherish pity, lest you drive an angel from your door.
IMAGE: textual dense, children in pain, in uniform (shows its a charity school), regimented, not organic, they are all the same image, repression.
POLITICAL / SOCIAL x

| Posted on 2010-06-15 | by a guest


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This poem is about Blake's big, hairy schloong, and how he liked to use it on scholl children. YOU SICK BARSTARD!!!.

| Posted on 2010-05-31 | by a guest


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for a yr 11 speech i had to annotate the poem, but all of the above were absolute bullshit, so here is my annotation: William blae was a conquer who conquered the near by planet of venus from the native plactitions. this deed was inspired from the story of zucan, the famous conquer of mars

| Posted on 2010-05-19 | by a guest


.: :.

William Blake was the first prime minister of swaziland, and in 2037 he became the first Human Android, a humanoid being that could adapt to live on other planets. He tamed the first dinosaur to be found outside of our galaxy, whom he named Shirley. Blake and Shirley wrote the film 'Back to the Future' in 2050, but lost it in space and it fell back in time to somewhere in the 80's i think. Anyway, Blake's poem 'Holy Thursday' is about the special Martian hunt that occurs every 3rd thursday of the year, where all the martians hunt stray dogs and spiders.

| Posted on 2010-04-23 | by a guest


.: :.

Although Blake's attacks on conventional religion were shocking in his own day, his rejection of religiosity was not a rejection of religion per se. His view of orthodoxy is evident in The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, a series of texts written in imitation of Biblical prophecy. Therein, I whistled for a cab and when it came near the licence plate said fresh and there were dice in the mirror, if anything i thought this cab was rare but I thought nah forget it go home to Bel air! I pulled up to the house about 7 or 8 and i yelled to the cabbie yo holmes smell ya later! I looked at my kingdom I was finally there, sitting on my throne as the prince of Bel Air.

| Posted on 2010-04-23 | by a guest


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Blake's feeling towards the church and religion is made very clear by Aunque digan que soy
un bandolero donde voy
le doy gracias a dios
por hoy estar donde estoy
y voy a seguir con mi tumbao
y con mi ojos colorao
con mis gatos activao
ustedes to me lo han dao

| Posted on 2010-04-23 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is based largely around the episode of CSI where warwick allows his emotions to gte the better of him.

| Posted on 2010-04-23 | by a guest


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Blake is criticising the Foundling hospital as here as they are exploiting the innocent children in order to glorify themselves.

| Posted on 2010-04-17 | by a guest


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Another note is that the poem is actually written to dscribe Societys issues and Holy thursday describes the opression felt by Charity Children this can be seen in ' two and two' which is a biblical allusion towards Noah's Ark, the children are being restrained and herded in like animals. As stated earlier you can also use flowers and wands quotes to describe control. Blake also criticises those in power through 'Beneath them sit the agd men, wise guardians of the poor', this is an ironic statement as these are not wise men. They allow the children's miserable lives to continue and do not help them. Blake also expresses the purity of the children through 'their innocent faces clean', and multiludes of lambs could also suggest their innocence. Im also unsure wheter or not it is a bliblical allusion once more to sacrifice? Your call...
Anyway thats my ideas on it theres alot more to it but i cant be bothered to add more. Written by a Skinners Pupil lolz. Only 15 yeeeeaaah...=D

| Posted on 2010-03-27 | by a guest


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Just a note thats not the correct version of the poem this is Twas on a Holy Thursday, their innocent faces clean,
The children walking two and two in red and blue and green,
Grey headed beadles walking before with wands as white as snow;
Till into the high dome of Paul's they like Thames waters flow.
Oh what a multitude they seemed, those flowers of London town.
Seated in companies they sit, with radiance all their own.
The hum of multitudes was there, but multitudes of lambs:
Thousands of little boys and girls raising their innocent hands.
Now like a mighty wind they raise to Heaven the voice of song,
Or like harmonious thunderings the seats of Heaven among.
Beneath them sit the agd men, wise guardians of the poor.
Then cherish pity, lest you drive an angel from your door.

| Posted on 2010-03-27 | by a guest


.: :.

Why are there a large bunch of young students that seem forced to post comments here? Blake's poems talk about serious issues - Issues which I'm sure you don't even understand... The reason he wrote these poems was to speak his mind about an unfair society. He didn't ask for everybody like all of you to speak your mind about random crap that has nothing to do with anything here. Think before you post. It's not funny, it's extremely ignorant and a waste of time for people looking for actual great information posted by people who know what they're talking about. For people that post here and know what you're talking about, I thank you. You're a great help.

| Posted on 2010-03-15 | by a guest


.: :.

A level student interpretation.
Blake uses natural imagery in 'Holy Thursday' (Innocence) to portray children in a favourable and godlike way. He describes them as being 'flowers of London town', a free and wild life force. He also describes them as 'flooding' St Pauls, a seemingly free and unstopable force. Blake also refers to the children as 'multitudes of lambs' yet again using a biblical reference as God/Jesus was associated with lambs, sometimes adopting the title 'Lamb of God'.
Blake's views on charity and figures of authority are again enforced in his writing. Blake criticises the 'grey headed beadles' who 'walk'd before with wands as white as snow', a contradictory description questioning the beadles' moral fibre. The use of colours to represent the deceitful beadles who are 'grey' internaly aswell as externally posing as 'white' shepherds to these children. They wish to appear as being good and charitable people, but the reality of it is they are exploiting this figurehead position to obtain a 'good' image.
Blake uses imagery again to describe the workhouse children, they are 'seated in companies'. This in contrast to the way Blake sees the children as being free souls. The beadles repress their wild and free characteristics as they are regimented in their seating structure on show above the wise 'aged men'.
The repressed nature of the children or indeed the general populace of London at the time, could have been inspired by events in the past or present of Blake writing 'Holy Thursday'. There was much civil unrest in 18th Century London, bans and laws placed on the public to 'repress' their freedom of speech such as the Combination act of 1799 banning trade unionism or the Traiterous rights act of 1793 allowing the government to read mail of civilians. It was a common theme in society at the time and so fueled much of his literary work.

| Posted on 2009-12-29 | by a guest


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The last analysis was by Ali in english :D.
Hello!
William blake also feels that charity is just someything that rich people can give to to make themselves feel better.
The last line "then cherish pity" highlights that if they cherished the children, they wouldn't need pity. That if you didn't have poverty, you wouldn't need charity.
by Ali :D

| Posted on 2009-10-15 | by a guest


.: :.

Holy Thursday by William Blake is an incredibly discriptive poem. He sets a scene (imaginary) in the readers mind of innocent orphans who are to take up the traditions of the Catholic church. They are being currupted out of their innocents by the older men of the church. William Blake opposes this and feels strongly about keeping children innocent....:D

| Posted on 2009-10-08 | by a guest


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The last response is the biggest attempt to bullshit this poem than any I've ever seen. I don't see why one's obsession with Harry Potter needs to be executing in such a waste of time. Heavily ignorant.

| Posted on 2009-05-26 | by a guest


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This poem is by William Blake; he is a good poet he didn't like the insudrial revolution.
This poem is about wizard school and a boy named Paul. The kids of london, dressed in red (Gryffindor), green (Slytherin), and blue (Hugglepuff) enter Hogwarts. Wizard beatles greet them with white wands; beatles can be wizards too now that racism became illegal after the civil war. Thousands of lambs raise their hands (in the year 1823 when william blake wrote poem, "hands" means "hoofs"). The lambs have to keep an angel from escaping.

| Posted on 2009-02-20 | by a guest


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I like it sooo much and it is the best poem of blake

| Posted on 2008-12-15 | by a guest


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Holy Thursday from the songs of innocence by willilam blake the theme of the poem is the prists in a charity school of children are takin them to sant paul's cathedral just showing of they are using and abusing those innocent children for their own benefits that why Blake here attacking the religious and the educational system at that time .

| Posted on 2008-11-28 | by a guest


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Holy Thursday is about stds, child abuse, pregnancy, and london.

| Posted on 2008-09-15 | by a guest


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This Holy Thursday poem is interesting, as it has a flowing pattern all the way through. For starters, the children "like Thames waters flow". Also, when looking at the physical structure of the poem, when it is written in full (the lines aren't shortened like they are here), the right side of the poem has a wave effect, with shorter lines building up to long lines, and then back down.
This may or may not be significant, but it fits in with the children being pure. Being innocent children, they are hardly able to commit sins yet, and they are described as "multitudes of lambs". Jesus was also called a Lamb, so these children couldbe seen as righteous like Jesus was. The noise also builds up throughout the poem. In the first stanza, all seems quiet, in the second they to "hum", and in the third stanza they break out into "harmonious thunderings". This is also a waving motion.
With the children having clean faces, flowing like water, being the only things to stand out in a grey city (them being "red & blue & green", and "flowers of London town"), and "like a mighty wind" praising God, it could be said that they are pure, perfect creatures. If it the Holy Thursday, or the Ascension, and is their first communion, then they are finding God, being washed of their sins and becoming pure in his sight.
What a fitting ending, but to see the only piece of grammar in the whole poem pointing out the moral ", lest you drive an angel from your door". The children are not only 'lambs' of God, but angels.

| Posted on 2008-09-13 | by a guest


.: Holy Thursday :.

At the time that Blake wrote this poem Holy Thursday was considered to be the Ascension or forty days after Easter. It was a day when all the children who had gotten first communion came to church.

| Posted on 2008-01-29 | by a guest


.: Uh huh :.

a few odd reviews. i actually came here looking for one but i suppose i'll just post mine.

Now the orphans are being taken to St Pauls cathedreal for the Ascension Day ceremony (as described in a previous review) the beadles would have had them nicely dressed and clean for this event so Blake had all those nice images to work with. Blake makes a lot of innocent references about the orphans (lambs, innocent hands, innocent faces, etc) and the way i figure it, he's trying to make them seem so innocent that they won't be corrupted even though they're poor and have no family. Of course Blake then goes on to say thats a load of crap, heres what its really like, in Songs of Experience but thats another review :p

| Posted on 2007-04-09 | by a guest


.: The london :.

William Blake is a poet, he is cool and very smart. He speaks good english. He live in London and wrote a poet on London. He is born in the holy thursday into an orphanage. The poem London shows that there are many shops and traffic light in London( in red& blue &green). It also shows that london is the land of prosititute. When he wrote the HOly thursday he was cold and feeling a bit wierd. He made a snow man called Paul( as white as snow...of Paul)

| Posted on 2007-02-09 | by a guest


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The last review talked bull*~#^. The basics were correct, however. here's a dec-ent review:
Background:
HOLY THURSDAY is the most complex and profound of all religious observances, saving only the Easter Vigil. It celebrates both the institution by Christ Himself of the Eucharist and of the institution of the sacerdotal priesthood (as distinct from the "priesthood of all believers") for in this, His last supper with the disciples, a celebration of Passover, He is the self-offered Passover Victim, and every ordained priest to this day presents this same sacrifice, by Christ's authority and command, in exactly the same way. The Last Supper was also Christ's farewell to His assembled disciples, some of whom would betray, desert or deny Him before the sun rose again.

"Holy Thursday" in "Songs of Innocence" was written in 1789. The poem describes the English church's celebration of Jesus's ascension which takes place on a Thursday 39 days after Easter. On this day, children from the charity schools of London were marched to a service at St. Paul's Cathedral. The beadles of the church were lower officers who were in charge of keeping order. In the last stanza of the poem, the children are singing in the balcony and the "aged men" are seated below them. The last line, "Then cherish pity, lest you drive an angel from your door." is an allusion to Hebrews 13:2, "Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares." This poem gives the reader a portrayal of the children as angelic.

"Holy Thursday" from "Songs of Experience" was written in 1794. This poem is also about the English church's ceremony on Holy Thursday, but the tone is a bit more depressing. The last line of the second stanza, "It is eternal winter there," is describing how they see the ceremony from their experienced point of view. This is very different from the image created in "Holy Thursday" of "Songs of Innocence." The last stanza of the poem adds to the analogy of the ceremony to winter by saying that when the sun shines and the rain falls, there can never be hunger or poverty. Obviously, the sun doesn't shine and the rain doesn't fall in winter, which means that, according to this poem, there is hunger and poverty among the children; a much different image from the one seen in its companion poem.

| Posted on 2005-10-11 | by Approved Guest


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this poem is good, very very good. william blake is also very good. he is a poet. a very good poet. holy thursday talks about thursday, but only the holy one. holy thursday is good.william blake was an engraver. he invented new engraving methods, he didnt like the industrial revolution or the church or the government, he didnt like lots of things.this poem is good, very very good. william blake is also very good. he is a poet. a very good poet. holy thursday talks about thursday, but only the holy one. holy thursday is good.william blake was an engraver. he invented new engraving methods, he didnt like the industrial revolution or the church or the government, he didnt like lots of things.

| Posted on 2005-06-19 | by Approved Guest




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