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A Cradle Song Analysis



Author: Poetry of William Blake Type: Poetry Views: 1741

Songs of Innocence1789Sweet dreams form a shade,

O'er my lovely infants head.

Sweet dreams of pleasant streams,

By happy silent moony beamsSweet sleep with soft down.

Weave thy brows an infant crown.

Sweet sleep Angel mild,

Hover o'er my happy child.Sweet smiles in the night,

Hover over my delight.

Sweet smiles Mothers smiles,

All the livelong night beguiles.Sweet moans, dovelike sighs,

Chase not slumber from thy eyes,

Sweet moans, sweeter smiles,

All the dovelike moans beguiles.Sleep sleep happy child,

All creation slept and smil'd.

Sleep sleep, happy sleep.

While o'er thee thy mother weepSweet babe in thy face,

Holy image I can trace.

Sweet babe once like thee.

Thy maker lay and wept for meWept for me for thee for all,

When he was an infant small.

Thou his image ever see.

Heavenly face that smiles on thee,Smiles on thee on me on all,

Who became an infant small,

Infant smiles are His own smiles,

Heaven & earth to peace beguiles.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Yes, I must agree with the last comment. Do we critique the sunrise or sunset this way? I think that we must find the beauty in words without the suspicion. Just my opinion. I find the poem very calming.

| Posted on 2013-09-23 | by a guest


.: :.

Yes, I must agree with the last comment. Do we critique the sunrise or sunset this way? I think that we must find the beauty in words without the suspicion. Just my opinion. I find the poem very calming.

| Posted on 2013-09-23 | by a guest


.: :.

:P this is a fine literary example on the futility of women and their acceptance in to post-European society in the 21th century. For a fuller analysis see

| Posted on 2011-09-12 | by a guest


.: :.

OMG!
i really need some good info here! i have an assignment due and cant be stuffed writing anything, so i have now come across this lovley website which may or may not have info for me, but can some one please tell me what this poem is about! sankyou! XD

| Posted on 2011-03-20 | by a guest


.: :.

This website is not crap.
I don't know who you are, but you should stop acting like you know what the hell Blake's talking about. There are some people who legit like Blake, and are kind enough to interpret the poem, for you. Don't go out and rant at them, will you? Show some respect for the society in which you live. Otherwise, its gonna bite you in the ass later on.

| Posted on 2010-03-20 | by a guest


.: :.

This website is not crap.
I don't know who you are, but you should stop acting like you know what the hell Blake's talking about. There are some people who legit like Blake, and are kind enough to interpret the poem, for you. Don't go out and rant at them, will you? Show some respect for the society in which you live. Otherwise, its gonna bite you in the ass later on.

| Posted on 2010-03-20 | by a guest


.: :.

This is a wonderful poem about the peace and inocents found by a sleeping baby and the hope of god with in. i likey [:

| Posted on 2010-02-23 | by a guest


.: :.

ahhhh whats the message conveyed about family relationship?

| Posted on 2009-10-12 | by a guest


.: Alternative Outlook :.

Perhaps the Cradle Song could be taken from a different perspective altogether, instead hinting at Blake's favourite topic - sex. More specifically, the effect of an act of obvious experience would have on a child.
The fouth stanza is a strong basis for this argument. The 'sweet moans' and 'dovelike sighs' imply orgasm, whilst the 'sweeter smiles', seemingly generated from the moans, suggest sexual pleasure. The line "Chase not slumber from thy eyes" indicates a guilty fear of the speaker, that the child will awake from his 'innocent' slumber, due to the carefree sexual abandon of its parents, a common issue within 'Songs of Experience'
This theme of guilt by the speaker is continued in stanzas 6 and 7, with the lines "Thy maker lay and wept for me" and, "Wept for me and thee and all". It suggests a attempted show of remorse of his sinful activities, that he feel the child Jesus must weep for him, as he has sinned. He explains this to the child in the poem, in a form of confession, as he sees the child as akin to Jesus himself, "in they face/Holy image i can trace". Also, stanza 5 suggests a guilt by the child's mother, "While o'er thee thy mother weep". The common thought in Blake's time, of women's weakness and inferiority, meant that the mother is used as a more direct tool of repentance, with her weeping suggesting a fierce remorse.

| Posted on 2008-05-18 | by a guest


.: Alternative Outlook :.

Perhaps the Cradle Song could be taken from a different perspective altogether, instead hinting at Blake's favourite topic - sex. More specifically, the effect of an act of obvious experience would have on a child.
The fouth stanza is a strong basis for this argument. The 'sweet moans' and 'dovelike sighs' imply orgasm, whilst the 'sweeter smiles', seemingly generated from the moans, suggest sexual pleasure. The line "Chase not slumber from thy eyes" indicates a guilty fear of the speaker, that the child will awake from his 'innocent' slumber, due to the carefree sexual abandon of its parents, a common issue within 'Songs of Experience'
This theme of guilt by the speaker is continued in stanzas 6 and 7, with the lines "Thy maker lay and wept for me" and, "Wept for me and thee and all". It suggests a attempted show of remorse of his sinful activities, that he feel the child Jesus must weep for him, as he has sinned. He explains this to the child in the poem, in a form of confession, as he sees the child as akin to Jesus himself, "in they face/Holy image i can trace". Also, stanza 5 suggests a guilt by the child's mother, "While o'er thee thy mother weep". The common thought in Blake's time, of women's weakness and inferiority, meant that the mother is used as a more direct tool of repentance, with her weeping suggesting a fierce remorse.

| Posted on 2008-05-18 | by a guest


.: Blake :.

Nothing against Blake- I really like a lot of his stuff- Chimney Sweeper in innocence and experience is brilliant, but I think he was having a bad day with this one. Meant to be doing an as-level practice paper on it and am coming up with absolutely nothing. Arghl.. 'Explain how the form and structure of the poem contribute to its meaning'??
Erum.

| Posted on 2008-05-01 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem has eight stanzas, each stanza is composed of four lines. The enjambment of the first stanza creates the sense of the encapsulated world the child is dreaming of and the ambiguous void-like “shade” that hovers mysteriously over the child’s head. Is this “shade” a protective covering, which surrounds the child’s purity and innocence or is it the essence of experience that already awaits the sleeping “babe”. The rhyming sequence of the poem is AABB, Blake uses this to link key words and ideas together, for the first stanza the use of the rhyming couplets “shade” with “head” and “streams” with “beams” conjures a dreamy , pastoral atmosphere where the child is isolates from the evils of the world. The diction Blake chooses for the poem has a romantic quality to it, with words like, “sweet” “lovely” “pliant” and “moony” displaying a tranquil, romantic readiness which pervades the poem. The metric structure of the poem is trochaic, however the elision of the last syllable of the end of lines one and two, of the first stanza, add emphasis and harshness of the sounding of “shade” and head, which evoke the innocence and possibly naivety of the child at this stage in its life and of what dream and their interpretations may mean. Lines three and four are trochaic, however the metric pattern is intact which softens the sounding of these sentences, creating a lullaby rhythm thus disturbing the reader of any suspicions of the comfort, love and protection for the child they may sense after the opening lines.(thats as far as i have got)

| Posted on 2008-04-27 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem has eight stanzas, each stanza is composed of four lines. The enjambment of the first stanza creates the sense of the encapsulated world the child is dreaming of and the ambiguous void-like “shade” that hovers mysteriously over the child’s head. Is this “shade” a protective covering, which surrounds the child’s purity and innocence or is it the essence of experience that already awaits the sleeping “babe”. The rhyming sequence of the poem is AABB, Blake uses this to link key words and ideas together, for the first stanza the use of the rhyming couplets “shade” with “head” and “streams” with “beams” conjures a dreamy , pastoral atmosphere where the child is isolates from the evils of the world. The diction Blake chooses for the poem has a romantic quality to it, with words like, “sweet” “lovely” “pliant” and “moony” displaying a tranquil, romantic readiness which pervades the poem. The metric structure of the poem is trochaic, however the elision of the last syllable of the end of lines one and two, of the first stanza, add emphasis and harshness of the sounding of “shade” and head, which evoke the innocence and possibly naivety of the child at this stage in its life and of what dream and their interpretations may mean. Lines three and four are trochaic, however the metric pattern is intact which softens the sounding of these sentences, creating a lullaby rhythm thus disturbing the reader of any suspicions of the comfort, love and protection for the child they may sense after the opening lines.(thats as far as i have got)

| Posted on 2008-04-27 | by a guest


.: HAPPY :.

I THINK THAT BLAKES POEMS ARE AND I REALLY ENJOYED STABBS LAST NIGHT BUT THE CRADLE SONG WAS VERY INTESTING THANKS

| Posted on 2008-04-09 | by a guest


.: HAPPY :.

I THINK THAT BLAKES POEMS ARE BRILL AND I REALLY ENJOYED STABBS LAST NIGHT BUT THE CRADLE SONG WAS VERY INTESTING THANKS

| Posted on 2008-04-09 | by a guest


.: HAPPY :.

I THINK THAT BLAKES POEMS ARE BRILL AND I REALLY ENJOYED STABBS MUM LAST NIGHT BUT THE CRADLE SONG WAS VERY INTESTING THANKS

| Posted on 2008-04-09 | by a guest


.: Cradle Song :.

"Cradle Song" is typical of the poems from "Innocence". It describes a world of comfort, love and protection. A father wonders at his offspring and, for a while, in encapsulated in the world of children. The light, bouncing rhythm is apt as this poem is both a lullaby and, at the same time, describing a lullaby.
Compare this poem with other poems in "Innocence", such as "Infant Joy", "The Echoing Green" and "Nurse's Song" and we see something of a utopian world. However, if we are to then look to the poems in Experience we realise that life isn't always like this. Poems such as "The Chimney Sweeper" (Experience), "Nurse's Song" (Experience) and "Infant Sorrow" show us that there is always a darker side to things that might, on first glance, appear ideal.

| Posted on 2008-03-24 | by a guest


.: :.

“Cradle Song” by William Blake has a very easy to understand subject, that is a man talking to a sleeping baby, but the true meaning of the poem is a bit more elusive. The speaker wonders what “secret joys and secret smiles” may be dancing through the babe’s mind as it sleeps (7). He marvels at “the cunning wiles that creep in [it’s] little heart asleep” and comments that when it’s “little heart doth wake” the darkness of the night will be gone (13-15). The poem praises the babe’s innocence and purity throughout.

| Posted on 2008-03-05 | by a guest


.: my bad interpretation :.

lol! It's a lullaby type song with great repetition and rhyme. Lots of soft sounding S's. 'Moonlight' symbolises romanticism. It is about the creation of jesus, the mother cries because she is scared to bring the baby into the big bad world. 'Sweet babe once like thee' how jesus took all our sins. A human child has the possibility to have god like qualities.

| Posted on 2007-05-22 | by a guest


.: complaint :.

for gods sake someone clever please write one in a few hours, we have to do a presentation tomorrow! seriously this is a very unhelpful website i have just been told that this complaint is too short so i am going to moan some more- my friend was 18 yesterday and she has a very bad hangover, and apparently a good bra! therfore, we are unable to do our own work becasue we are not in the mood- i personally am currently doing three shows, dance classes, gym and not to mention two jobs- by the way, did i mention that today i smacked myself on the head very badly with a broom- possible concussion! in short, our analysis is that this website is crap and we advise anyone to avoid as much as possible. thankyou x x x x

| Posted on 2005-10-05 | by Approved Guest




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