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Sonnet 116: Let me not to the marriage of true minds Analysis



Author: Poetry of William Shakespeare Type: Poetry Views: 4314

The Sonnets1609Let me not to the marriage of true minds

Admit impediments. Love is not love

Which alters when it alteration finds,

Or bends with the remover to remove.

O no, it is an ever-fixèd mark

That looks on tempests and is never shaken;

It is the star to every wand'ring bark,

Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.

Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks

Within his bending sickle's compass come;

Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,

But bears it out even to the edge of doom.If this be error and upon me proved,I never writ, nor no man ever loved.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

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I think Shakespeare just want to tell us that we should be careful in choosing and do not rush things!!!
So I choose the best girl in the world she's very beautiful and good I love her so

| Posted on 2014-11-04 | by a guest


.: :.

I think Shakespeare just want to tell us that we should be careful in choosing and do not rush things!!!
So I choose the best girl in the world she's very beautiful and good I love her so

| Posted on 2014-11-04 | by a guest


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Shakespeare took a toll for a good poem with this one. interestingly enough, he goes at the claim about true love, and it strength. true love is strong and will not break!!

| Posted on 2012-12-16 | by a guest


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Shakespeares novels and poems have a very indepth meaning.Even though english has evolved through the years we can still find true inspiration in shakespeares writings!I think that we shouldn\'t do it at school...His writings are for people that can read with understanding.

| Posted on 2012-01-22 | by a guest


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Shakespeare poem is deep but, honestly, we can\'t use it in life.

| Posted on 2011-10-27 | by a guest


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british system should stop making people study shakespeare at school even teachers dont fully understand his writting nobody really does becuase its out of context and useless to understand present life.

| Posted on 2011-04-30 | by a guest


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i barely understand any of this but i understood that shakespeare is truly an amzing poet but why the hell should we take this at school Its rreally hard to summarise and annotate.anyways good luck to ever

| Posted on 2011-02-26 | by a guest


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Forget about the flaws of the poem and the man behind the poem, we all have those. Just concentrate on the beauty and depth of the poem. Dont think about the context for a minute and just accept that it is a poem about everlasting love, which sadly is something we as a world seem to be lacking.

| Posted on 2011-01-09 | by a guest


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i agree with comment posted in 2010-03-07... i hate shakespeare!!

| Posted on 2010-10-26 | by a guest


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i agree with comment posted in 2010-03-07... i hate shakespeare!!

| Posted on 2010-10-26 | by a guest


.: :.

I think Shakespeare just want to tell us that we should be careful in choosing and do not rush things!!!

| Posted on 2010-10-21 | by a guest


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these poem is definally about serious love, that no one can ever change, not even time through the last day of earth to the last breath of their most sincered love. loved bends all this obstacles....

| Posted on 2010-10-13 | by a guest


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the poem clearly states an unending love..nothing can outwit, withstand true love..

| Posted on 2010-10-12 | by a guest


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Shakespeare's stand as regards Love - ideal or True Love - is beyond reproach logically. After all, anything that falls short of it is clearly not the Shakespearean True love. I do not mind admitting that Shakespearean True Love is also the universal understanding of what True Love should mean.
That True Love is a far cry from reality - as is the case with all Ideals - is hinted at by Shakespeare himself when he speaks of 'true minds'.
The interesting thing is that one can decide whether some love is true love or not only in retrospect. If some love wavered and was lost, it was not true love after all.

| Posted on 2010-06-27 | by a guest


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This is not for educational purposes, but Sonnet 116 by Wiliam Shakespeare - if you have ever TRULY been in love, you can relate to.When the whole world tells you otherwise, if you experience true love, it will never change - nothing and nobody can change it. It can with stand all trials and tribulations. It can with stand a third party ....that looks on tempests and is never shaken- it is a beacon that is worth more than anything on earth...that makes you giddy and silly...it never changes with time - it is constant - no matter how much of time is spent apart - it never changes...it is everlasting.
And for those of you studying this poem, wait till you TRULY grow up and fall in love...it applies to life's love...and you will relate to it. From someone who has been through hell and back for love...and is still in love.

| Posted on 2010-04-01 | by a guest


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To the person who said this is useless:
I think it is important that you keep in mind that this was the form of entertainment for the day. There may be some important meanings etc. hidden underneath the surface, but much of Shakespeare's work was written for theatre. It's like the modern day equivalent of television.
Also, poetry can be used to say things that are otherwise difficult to say. You can use less words to say more. You can comment on politics, culture, people, etc... Poetry is a very powerful form of literature!
And if you like music, you like poetry. Wether your style is heavy metal, pop, rap, hip-hop, or country... they all utilize elements of poetry... and they often have the same themes.

| Posted on 2010-03-25 | by a guest


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"why did poetry even get created than we could have 1 less thing to do at school. like how is this crap realy gona help me in life."
The above was posted on 2009-10-16 | by a guest
+
And this is to whom we leave the great works of Shakespeare? Someone who cannot comprehend something not first uttered on "The Hills".

| Posted on 2010-03-07 | by a guest


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For everyone who says this is useless, open your eyes and see the beauty behind it.

| Posted on 2010-01-03 | by a guest


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I cant believe with the readings i have done on this particular sonnet that no one got it right! My god! This is ridiculous.Clearly, people got the obvious out of the poem. Yes, Shakespeare is talking about the constant of love. However, the is an essential part of the poem missed completely. Shakespeare here is talking about the constancy of LOVE amidst an affair. He refused to admit obstacles in his marriage to a fellow in-love true mind partner.It would not be love if it is easily altered when an alterations is presented.Or bends with a remover---one will assume, the 'other woman'. Oh no, Love is for his true mind partner is marriage is ever fixed.So much fixed that if a tepest aka the other woman appear, love is unshaken.This unshaken love is a guide/shinning star to the poor wandering bark. (bark as in a cheater, a dog) Whose worth is unknown, because his worth is that he loves her constant. Although his height in her esteem is taken,his love is not fooled by time. Time will not trick love, Love will not be a fool, and lead to forget his love.Though the tempest with rosy lips and cheeks lures,and his love is bended like a sickle, compass comes. Love, the shinning star comes back to guide the wandering bark.Love does not only not alter is these brief hours and weeks of affair or temptations,Love bears out in the edge of doom. When the affair is found perhaps? And if LOVE is not a fixed mark, with alters not when alteration finds, which guides the wandering dog, and ultimately compass his back to his truest marriage partner, then I, Shakespeare-- have not written nor man on earth ever loved! x Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove.
O no, it is an ever-fixèd mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wand'ring bark,
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.If this be error and upon me proved,I never writ, nor no man ever loved

| Posted on 2009-12-20 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that Shakespeare suspected at times that he was himself a fiction, a "quintessence of dust", and that his fine gifts and aspirations were being gently mocked. So, indeed, "this error" could be upon him proved. The ghost of unreality, of inconsequence, is the one he most needs to vanquish.
He wasn't making any slant rhymes. In his day "loved" and "proved" were pronounced alike, with the double "o" sound that "proved" has retained. A word like "day" would be pronounced like "die", and "say" like "sigh". Anthony Burgess wrote that if you want to hear how people sounded in Shakespeare's day you should talk to a Boston cabdriver.
Shakespeare likes to tease sometimes. The phrase, "though his height be taken", is a wink as good as a nod.

| Posted on 2009-12-12 | by a guest


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Why do we do this in school... It is useless.... :(

| Posted on 2009-12-11 | by a guest


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I appreciate the constructive responses posted here and agree that one reading of the poem is an honest analysis of true love. Unfortunately, I have never found a passage of Shakespeare that is entirely honest; he is always wearing a mask and always has something up his sleeve. Consequently, this poem, which seems like a straightforward proclamation of the steadfastness of love probably is too good to be true. He does the same thing in Romeo & Juliet, offering what looks like a great romance but loaded with problems that indicate the opposite of real love. Here there are numerous ambiguities, subtle references, and structural alterations that indicate if nothing else a difficulty in the poem. x

| Posted on 2009-11-11 | by a guest


.: :.

poems that date way back have parelles with other objects this case its love others it could be anything dealth,hate mabye even sex but if u look else where to find the answers you won'y understand why these things are in there u have to find them yourselve

| Posted on 2009-11-01 | by a guest


.: :.

why did poetry even get created than we could have 1 less thing to do at school. like how is this crap realy gona help me in life.

| Posted on 2009-10-16 | by a guest


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‘Let me not to the marriage of true minds admit impediments.’ - In this line he seems to be saying that he doesn’t wish to ever have to admit to Love (the marriage of true minds) that he himself may not love perfectly, hence ‘admit impediments’.
He then goes on to describe what true love is ...
‘Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds’ - Love won’t change even when alteration finds it or it finds alteration in another.
‘Or bends with the remover to remove’ - Is strong and holds on through trials.
‘O no, it is an ever-fixè’d mark’ - It can never leave you. Once you have loved you are changed (marked...perhaps either by joy or pain. This is such an honest and true statement because once you’ve encountered love of that kind and opened yourself to it you are never the same, you ‘re changed by that intensity)
‘That looks on tempests and is never shaken’ - Regardless of the criticism, difficulties, etc... that may come, love doesn’t let go.
‘It is the star to every wand'ring bark,’ - It is a guide to everyone who is lost for direction & purpose.
‘Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.’ - This is saying that although the world looks at someone and judges them by what they see (height be taken), nobody really knows how wonderful that person is except the one who loves them, the one who looks deeper.
‘Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come;’ - Time doesn’t control love, or stop love, or change love - love is not his fool....even though he may get the better of our looks and youth.
‘Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,’ - Love doesn’t change as time counts down. To me this also points out how fast time passes when you’re with the person you love....there’s just never enough time.
‘But bears it out even to the edge of doom’ - Love stays true even to the very last breath.
‘If this be error and upon me proved,I never writ, nor no man ever loved.’ - He is saying that if his summation of love is wrong and proved wrong by his own failure to submit to his stated insight of love, then he never wrote (which he obviously did, so he must be pretty confident in his conclusions) and no man ever loved...saying I think, that if you haven't loved so strongly as described, then you can’t claim to have truly loved (this is a strong statement to make and I don’t necessarily believe this one point to be true, but nonetheless it’s a perfectly beautiful poem and is no doubt much more in-depth than I’ve portrayed it to be). Art like this deserves sincere contemplation and should never be discounted because we don’t understand it the first few times we read it. My explanation is hardly conclusive, but I hope it makes this poem a little clearer and more easy to appreciate to someone out there. Thanks!

| Posted on 2009-09-13 | by a guest


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I love Shakespeare. His works are just too good. This poem obviously speaks about true love and how it cannot be altered with time and space. Apart from that its just crap nonsense (epithetic adjective) and bull shit. I dont understand anything

| Posted on 2009-07-20 | by a guest


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in the first line it says that one must not just love by their minds but by heart also. the second to 4th line tells that in love, we must accept obstacles and love will not be true love if it is being altered by someone. in the 5th line says that love is an ever-fixed mark, meaning love is permanent. the 6th line tells that love is never destroyed though violent or bad situations occur. 7th line tells that love is like a star to every wandering boat. we all know that sailors used star as their guide for directions. so i conclude then that the 7th line tells that love gives direction to our lives and it is our guide. 8th line tells that love's value cannot be identified though we know how much we love someone. 9-11th line tells that love is strong and time is no match for true love. even the edge of doom/death cannot destroy love because love is eternal. the last line tells that if shakespeare is wrong about love he should not have written this sonnet and no man should have ever loved but because he wrote this, that means he is right about true love

| Posted on 2009-07-20 | by a guest


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I am only 13 but understand the sonnet. It is obvious shakepeare means you dont love someone, even though you may find them highly attractive. Love is stronger, the emotions of love never change. That you normally love the person you hate, because your feelings about them never change. That you hate them, but couldn't live without them!

| Posted on 2009-06-25 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that Shakespeare was in a depresing mood and he was thinking to himself asking himself " Am I making the right chose should I get married or not" See Shakespeare is a great poet he sends us a good message in this poem "Let me ot to the marriage of true minds" he tells us: We should wait for the right time to get married don't just speed up into marriage because if you do you might regret it.

| Posted on 2009-05-06 | by a guest


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Shakespeare was writing in a way very different than many who preceeded him. The Pastoralist poets had used love in their writing as something only available to the young and the beautiul ("To the Virgins to Make Much of Time" comes to mind). Their idea was that you had to make the most of your youth and beauty to get love because love would fade as beauty did. Shakespeare's sonnets were a refreshing disagreement with this. In this poem he claims that true love does not change, and cannot be changed by any circumstances. Another sonnet of his that contradicts the Pastoralist theme is number 130 in which he admits that his mistress is not the most lovely, that his love is realistic, and that this means he loves her truly, not superficially. i love this poem.

| Posted on 2009-04-24 | by a guest


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Clearly if Shakespeare claims to know all about love and is the direct perfectionist to do with his wording on love then why does he have a wife and a mistress when he cannot make up his mind who he loves. Clearly thats not true love, its more like pilegamy instead of claiming to have true love in the first place.
Garry Meston.

| Posted on 2009-02-25 | by a guest


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This shakespear crap is impossible to figure out.!:(

| Posted on 2009-02-21 | by a guest


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this did'nt help me at all i realy don't know how to summerize this crap i hate doing shakespear. its so difficult to understand. agh

| Posted on 2009-02-21 | by a guest


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If your love is true and absolutley whole, it should conquer time or bending changes. Nothing should alter, or form a barrier between the trueness of love and anything else.

| Posted on 2009-02-17 | by a guest


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If your love alters than it isn't true love... He is defining what true love is and he is confident about it. Time would never take away love if its genuine love...At the end he tells the reader how confident he is about his definition of true love. retirical device... dominated by negative throught the poem he uses no's and nots

| Posted on 2009-01-16 | by a guest


.: theme :.

Theme:
This poem is undoubtedly about love.
It describes love defeating change, time and even death. Love is an absolute.

| Posted on 2008-04-12 | by a guest


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Tyler Vancuren
Paper 2

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments; love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove.
O, no, it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wand’ring bark,
Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
Love ’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

William Shakespeare’s poem “Sonnet 116 is a sonnet in Shakespearean form. The subject of this poem is love and the main theme is that love endures. The poet-speaker is a man who is describing love with a stately tone. Judging by the knowledge the speaker has about love, it is probably safe to assume that he is a mature adult. Throughout the poem, the poet-speaker discusses how true love cannot have alterations, how love is comparable to a guide, and finally how it can withstand time itself.
The first stanza in this poem is a quatrain and its rhyme scheme is abab. Shakespeare uses alliteration, assonance, consonance, and repetition to develop this stanza, which, as a whole, states that love does not change. The first line contains an example of alliteration in the words “me,” “marriage,” and “minds.” In this line, he is referring to love as “the marriage of true minds.” He uses the alliteration of the “m” sound to draw attention to his view of love as being a type of marriage. The words “admit” and “impediments” in the second line are examples of both assonance and consonance because of the identical “i” and “m” sounds. These two words placed beside each other help give the poem a flow that makes it much more pleasing to the ear, not only because of the assonance and consonance, but also because the words almost rhyme with each other. The second, third, and fourth lines of this stanza contain repetition. “Love,” “alter,” and “remove” are repeated to put emphasis on the points that he is trying to make. He is saying that if a person is really in love he or she would not have to make changes in their lover to make themself happy, and that love cannot be taken back.
The second stanza of this poem is a quatrain with a rhyme scheme of cdcd. This stanza contains assonance, a very clever metaphor, and personification in stating that love is ever-lasting and can be used as a guide in life. The words “star” and “bark” in line eight of the poem contain assonance of the “a” sound. Shakespeare uses this assonance to bring attention to the metaphor he is using, which compares love to the North Star, which is a guide for barks, or ships. By following their hearts, people can use love as a guide to get them through life. Also, the North Star is relatively permanent, and Shakespeare says love is an “ever-fixed mark” in line five of the poem. Line eight refers to a star when it says “Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.” Stars have no ownership nor a set gender, so this line contains personification. Shakespeare speaks of love as if it were human to express the importance of it.
The third stanza of this poem is another quatrain and its rhyme scheme is efef. Personification, assonance, and consonance help to get the point across that love is independent of time. In lines eight and nine, Shakespeare says “Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks within his bending sickle’s compass come.” Even though beauty fades with time, love does not. Shakespeare personifies time to help express that love does not operate on any specific clock. He even capitalizes “Time” as if it were a real person’s name. He also personifies death in line nine when he refers to the bending sickle, which would be the weapon of the infamous Grimm Reaper. Death can take away physical traits, but not true love. Assonance can be found in line eleven in the words “brief” and “week.” Shakespeare purposely includes this assonance to add to the rhythm of the poem while he expresses his view of love as not yielding to time or any other force. The use of the words “but” and “bear” in line twelve of the poem is an example of alliteration. Shakespeare uses these words to help express that love can survive anything on its own despite the pressures and influences of time.
The fourth and final stanza of this poem is a couplet with a rhyme scheme of gg. In this stanza, the poet-speaker boasts how confident he is in his opinion of love, suggesting that if his opinion is wrong, no one has ever loved. The end rhyme of these two lines is slant rhyme because “proved” and “loved” do not rhyme exactly. In line fourteen, the poet-speaker declares “I never writ, nor no man ever loved.” The words “never,” “no,” and “nor” are an example of alliteration. These negative words are used to strengthen the poet-speaker’s certainty of his opinion of love. Line fourteen also has internal rhyme. “Never” and “ever” are positioned before the word “loved”. Shakespeare uses this internal rhyme to make it clear that the speaker has full faith in his own words.
William Shakespeare’s poem “Sonnet 116 is an excellent poem. Using multiple literary tools, such as metaphors, personification, and internal rhyme, Shakespeare has created a masterpiece that describes love by what it is and is not. Because of the brilliant use of tools and flow in this poem, it will remain one of the best poems ever written.

| Posted on 2007-03-14 | by a guest




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