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Snake Analysis



Author: Poetry of D.H. Lawrence Type: Poetry Views: 2473

1923A snake came to my water-trough

On a hot, hot day, and I in pyjamas for the heat,

To drink there.

In the deep, strange-scented shade of the great dark carob-tree

I came down the steps with my pitcher

And must wait, must stand and wait, for there he was at the trough before

me.He reached down from a fissure in the earth-wall in the gloom

And trailed his yellow-brown slackness soft-bellied down, over the edge of

the stone trough

And rested his throat upon the stone bottom,

And where the water had dripped from the tap, in a small clearness,

He sipped with his straight mouth,

Softly drank through his straight gums, into his slack long body,

Silently.Someone was before me at my water-trough,

And I, like a second comer, waiting.He lifted his head from his drinking, as cattle do,

And looked at me vaguely, as drinking cattle do,

And flickered his two-forked tongue from his lips, and mused a moment,

And stooped and drank a little more,

Being earth-brown, earth-golden from the burning bowels of the earth

On the day of Sicilian July, with Etna smoking.

The voice of my education said to me

He must be killed,

For in Sicily the black, black snakes are innocent, the gold are venomous.And voices in me said, If you were a man

You would take a stick and break him now, and finish him off.But must I confess how I liked him,

How glad I was he had come like a guest in quiet, to drink at my water-trough

And depart peaceful, pacified, and thankless,

Into the burning bowels of this earth?Was it cowardice, that I dared not kill him? Was it perversity, that I longed to talk to him? Was it humility, to feel so honoured?

I felt so honoured.And yet those voices:






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

hey you guys its not good to swear!
Anyways i\'m doin an essay on this and its hard so yeh
Any help?☺☺

| Posted on 2013-02-07 | by a guest


.: :.

what the hell is this poem.I mean i find the man kinda stupid.Also this is the most boring poem i\'ve ever read.

| Posted on 2013-01-28 | by a guest


.: :.

May This Diwali be as bright as ever.
May this Diwali bring joy, health and wealth to you.
May the festival of lights brighten up you and your near and dear ones lives.
May this Diwali bring in u the most brightest and choicest happiness and love you have ever Wished for.
May this Diwali bring you the utmost in peace and prosperity.
May lights triumph over darkness.
May peace transcend the earth.
May the spirit of light illuminate the world.
May the light that we celebrate at Diwali show us the way and lead us together on the path of peace and social harmony
\"WISH U A VERY HAPPY DIWALI\"

| Posted on 2012-11-12 | by a guest


.: :.

ya... well it\'s a worse poem i ever had read...
i just hate this y^**^aar...
it\'ll really take me 2 hell...
i just want a sweet & simple summary of it but what all rubbish they are showing...its allover a senseless x

| Posted on 2012-03-15 | by a guest


.: :.

ya... well it\'s a worse poem i ever had read...
i just hate this y^**^aar...
it\'ll really take me 2 hell...
i just want a sweet & simple summary of it but what all rubbish they are showing...its allover a senseless x

| Posted on 2012-03-15 | by a guest


.: :.

good poem.The narrator is fascinated by the majestic creature who had come to his water trough for quenching its thirst.Poet feels honoured for the snake chosen his water trough.but his voice of education taught him that golden snakes are venemous ohe hits it with a wooden log, but repents later for his vulger-paltryand mean act of hitting the snake.poet makes use of similiess , repitition and allitrations to make the poem more crisp for the readers.
sana.

| Posted on 2012-03-15 | by a guest


.: :.

i just hate this poem
it is a damn f*ckin poem

| Posted on 2012-03-11 | by a guest


.: :.

only...about the author is there....or the reason behind the poem,etc..not about the poem....we want the real meaing of the poem..in aour examzz...the meaing oh the not the reason behind of..about the author.so plz...give us the summary of this poem.

| Posted on 2012-02-26 | by a guest


.: :.

Lawrence introduces the poem by getting straight to the point, also using a repetition to show that it is a really hot day. Lawrence wrote the poem, possibly because it was a true story, but most likely because he was trying to display mans feelings about snakes and question it. He believes that the snake is a gentle creature, simply thirsty and grateful for there to be water nearby. To him it is a compliment. But to most, it is a natural instinct to dispose if the beautiful creature.
The poem indicates that even though his knowledge was telling him to end the snake right then and there, because he considered it a king, it shows that the snake had as much right to drink from the water trough as any man or beast did. Even though it was venomous, it was doing no harm.
A great technique used, as I mentioned earlier, is the repetition. D. H. Lawrence uses the repetition at the beginning, describing how hot the day is. Lawrence obviously wants us to know that the reason he and the snake have come to the trough is because it is a very hot day. He uses the repetition later, but another technique he uses is the simile. He uses it when describing the snake lifting his head like drinking cattle to. He uses the drinking cattle reference twice, showing that the snakes actions deeply resemble those of cattle. He also uses a simile when saying that the snake looked around like a god. Another good technique Lawrence uses is when he is describing his act after he threw the log. By using the three synonyms paltry, vulgar and mean, he shows that trying to harm the creature was definitely a horrible thing to do. Overall it was a well written and structured poem most enjoyable by the advanced reader.

| Posted on 2012-01-28 | by a guest


.: :.

Snake is a seventy-four-line free-verse poem divided into nineteen verse paragraphs (stanzas of unequal length). Like many modern lyrics, it incorporates a narrative element, recording the poets encounter with a snake at his water-trough. Through this structure and carefully mobilized imagery, the poet reveals his conflicted, deepening consciousness, which moves from casual description to epiphanic confession. Written when D. H. Lawrence and his wife Frieda were living in Taormina, Sicily, in 1920-1921, the poem is derived from Lawrences actual experience...

| Posted on 2012-01-06 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem puts aquestion that who is vennomous man or snake

| Posted on 2011-12-30 | by a guest


.: :.

Snake by D.H Lawrence
In this moving poem, D.H. Lawrence recalls a time in 1923 when he was living in Sicily. Lawrence, our narrator, is thirsty and goes out into the courtyard to fetch some water from his trough (at that time plumbing was not invented). He receives a surprise when he sees a “golden-brown” snake drinking peacefully at his trough. He has conflicting views on what he should do-society and his “conditioning” tell him to kill the snake, as does religion (the snake represents the devil, and tempts human beings in genesis). However, his inner nature tells him that the snake is not to be feared, as all it is doing is peacefully drinking and will depart soon. This poem is really a battle between human nature and conditioning. For me personally, my general belief of what this poem is about is a mixture of things, one of them being reason vs. fear. The narrator has been taught to kill poisonous snakes- not all snakes. It\'s a dangerous animal, and his first instinct is to kill it because that is what he was taught. Kill the snake before it kills you. However, the snake is only drinking peacefully and so the narrator is then conflicted. On one hand he\'s fascinated by the creature and doesn\'t want to harm it if it isn\'t aggressive, yet the voices continue to tell him to kill it. He thinks himself a coward for not doing so. In the end he attempts to kill the snake only to deeply regret it, because he struck first without being provoked.
D.H. Lawrence uses repetition to emphasize repeatedly the fact that the snake may not be as bad as we humans believe. He says: “Was it cowardice, that I dared not kill him? Was it perversity, that I longed to talk to him? Was it humility, to feel so honoured?” This gives a striking effect of repeated loops, and leads us to consider our own misgivings. Consider this: “He lifted his head from his drinking, as cattle do, and looked at me vaguely, as drinking cattle do.” This emphasizes that the snake is actually more harmless than they seem to be. Repetition also reinforces his own conditioning as shown here: “And voices in me said, If you were a man, you would take a stick and break him now, and finish him off…And yet those voices: If you were not afraid, you would kill him!”
D.H. Lawrence also uses extensive language to convey the situation. He uses words like: “convulsed… undignified… vulgar…” to express exactly how the snake and he himself looked and felt like. These long words also help to keep the pace and rhythm. These make the poem slower, conveying the extreme heat of a hot day in Sicily. It makes the poem slurred and slow. Even when reading, it is read slowly and emotionally. The words “earth-lipped…burning bowels…slack” also convey the extreme heat. He also uses ‘lush’ words to show the extent of nature. “Lords of life…god” conveys the power of the being that he sent away.

| Posted on 2011-05-10 | by a guest


.: :.

Lawrence introduces the poem by getting straight to the point, also using a repetition to show that it is a really hot day. Lawrence wrote the poem, possibly because it was a true story, but most likely because he was trying to display mans feelings about snakes and question it. He believes that the snake is a gentle creature, simply thirsty and grateful for there to be water nearby. To him it is a compliment. But to most, it is a natural instinct to dispose if the beautiful creature.
The poem indicates that even though his knowledge was telling him to end the snake right then and there, because he considered it a king, it shows that the snake had as much right to drink from the water trough as any man or beast did. Even though it was venomous, it was doing no harm.
A great technique used, as I mentioned earlier, is the repetition. D. H. Lawrence uses the repetition at the beginning, describing how hot the day is. Lawrence obviously wants us to know that the reason he and the snake have come to the trough is because it is a very hot day. He uses the repetition later, but another technique he uses is the simile. He uses it when describing the snake lifting his head like drinking cattle to. He uses the drinking cattle reference twice, showing that the snakes actions deeply resemble those of cattle. He also uses a simile when saying that the snake looked around like a god. Another good technique Lawrence uses is when he is describing his act after he threw the log. By using the three synonyms paltry, vulgar and mean, he shows that trying to harm the creature was definitely a horrible thing to do. Overall it was a well written and structured poem most enjoyable by the advanced reader.
Lachlan Bouckley

| Posted on 2009-04-23 | by a guest




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