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The Sound Of Trees Analysis



Author: Poetry of Robert Frost Type: Poetry Views: 2221

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Mountain Interval1916I wonder about the trees.

Why do we wish to bear

Forever the noise of these

More than another noise

So close to our dwelling place?

We suffer them by the day

Till we lose all measure of pace,

And fixity in our joys,

And acquire a listening air.

They are that that talks of going

But never gets away;

And that talks no less for knowing,

As it grows wiser and older,

That now it means to stay.

My feet tug at the floor

And my head sways to my shoulder

Sometimes when I watch trees sway,

From the window or the door.

I shall set forth for somewhere,

I shall make the reckless choice

Some day when they are in voice

And tossing so as to scare

The white clouds over them on.

I shall have less to say,

But I shall be gone.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

I believe this poem makes absolutely no sense. Robert Frost was probably high when he wrote this, and honestly, this is probably the worst poem I have ever read.
Regarts,
Dolan

| Posted on 2013-04-27 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that one has to make note of the words of Seamus Heaney\'s observation of the \"Dark side of Frost\" in order to get the most out of this poem. I mean, there are the blatant ambiguities in definition as to what exactly the personification of the trees symbolises, and my favourite comment of above makes the point that senile tendencies can be noticed in thee incessant rambling of the trees, so much as to make us have to \"bear\" it. Individuality is a theme that is dealt with in this poem, in the way that the narrator shift from \"we\" to \"I\" as he progresses. This could mean that the narrator has perhaps become confused as to which party he belongs to, as result of such a mixed life, or the slow process of fragmentation that one goes through as one gets older and wiser. Alas, Frost cuts this fantasy short with his dark side, as by then we shall have \"less to say\". The use of \"they\" in regards to the trees gives a distant feel to them, and is almost used in contempt as to what they signify. This belief in mass stagnation can be seen in Frost\'s \"Neither Out Far nor in Deep\" which is another worth reading.

| Posted on 2011-05-04 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this poem is about thinking about doing something in life someday but never actually being able to what we really wanna do. Robert Frost is comparing us (humans) to trees. Trees always sway back and forth like they\'re about to take off on a journey yet they can\'t move becuase they\'re rooted to the ground. He\'s planning to be better but is getting too old and now its too late.

| Posted on 2011-03-23 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe that the Frost is telling of life or death. He is thinking of suicide which makes sence knowing about his family history, and death.

| Posted on 2010-05-24 | by a guest


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I believe Frost is explaining the importance of experience in our lives. He explains how the older we get, the wiser we are from bad and good experiences. He expresses that experience is an adventure, because you really don't know where you might go, "but you will go Somewhere".

| Posted on 2010-05-04 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe Frost is explaining the importance of experience in our lives. He explains how the older we get, the wiser we are from bad and good experiences. He expresses that experience is an adventure, because you really don't know where you might go, "but you will go Somewhere".

| Posted on 2010-05-04 | by a guest


.: :.

Frost is describing what I believe to be senility. Where, the older people tend to claim wisdom, but never prove it, or at which point in life, people become all talk, and decide upon adventures and freedoms they will never enjoy. He also says that the only way an elderly person would ever explore or move about, is in death, when they cannot speak of their adventures anymore.

| Posted on 2009-06-10 | by a guest


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I beleive this poem describes man's inherant need to explore. The reader experiences this desire and subsequently projects his emotions onto the trees. The way in which trees sway in the wind but are never able to get anywhere alerts the reader to his own fate and thus he announcecs that he will "set forth for somwhere". The assertive languige "i shall set forth" is immediatley undermined by the indecisiveness of "somewhere" and as readers we are left with something intermediate where by we cannot know whether the reader will set out on a journey.

| Posted on 2009-05-13 | by a guest


.: :.

Frost is commenting on how man tends to impose or project his own emotions and faults on others (a theory Carl Jung developed). In this case, the speaker is indirectly criticising his own hypocrisy. We talk of escapism but in the end our responsibilities disallow us to fulfill promises of mobility. There may be some that choose to drift carelessly like the "white clouds" mentioned but most of us seem to imitate the 'empty talk' of the trees. After all, the speaker physically becomes an image of a tree blowing in the wind as he watches them: "My feet tug at the floor | And my head sways to my shoulder". He may think it is the trees that influence him but isn't it merely human nature? Perhaps this is what Frost is cynically trying to convey.Frost is commenting on how man tends to impose or project his own emotions and faults on others (a theory Carl Jung developed). In this case, the speaker is indirectly criticising his own hypocrisy. We talk of escapism but in the end our responsibilities disallow us to fulfill promises of mobility. There may be some that choose to drift carelessly like the "white clouds" mentioned but most of us seem to imitate the 'empty talk' of the trees. After all, the speaker physically becomes an image of a tree blowing in the wind as he watches them: "My feet tug at the floor | And my head sways to my shoulder". He may think it is the trees that influence him but isn't it merely human nature? Perhaps this is what Frost is cynically trying to convey.

| Posted on 2009-04-14 | by a guest


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I think this is about the tragic life of trees. They are trapped by their roots and have no defense against fire breathing dragons or lumberjacks. The only way of crying out is the rustle of their leaves. The dragons team up with the Gorgons and attack the trees when they least expect it. The trees die and the two species share the flesh. The dragons use their fire breath to cook it, while the Gorgons use axes and swords to cut it up.

| Posted on 2009-03-04 | by a guest


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i believe that in this poem Frost is trying to explain our stages of life. There are many stages in life and we need to learn how to cherish and appreciate each and every one of them. Instead of rushing what will happen later, we should focus on what is happening now. We should focus on what we have now. Before it is too late, before we cant anymore.

| Posted on 2008-11-13 | by a guest


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i believe this poem to be Frost's expression of emotion towards the sounds of nature. He is pointing out the difference between normal sounds and ones as simple as the trees. there is nothing obviously special about them but it is something that can transport you away from the ongoing world. they are distracting from objectives of common activities.

| Posted on 2008-10-29 | by a guest




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