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The Pasture Analysis



Author: Poetry of Robert Frost Type: Poetry Views: 2775

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North of Boston1914I'm going out to clean the pasture spring;

I'll only stop to rake the leaves away

(And wait to watch the water clear, I may):

I shan't be gone long. -- You come too.I'm going out to fetch the little calf

That's standing by the mother. It's so young,

It totters when she licks it with her tongue.

I shan't be gone long. -- You come too.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

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The meaning is probably that you should do chores before anything else, or maybe that you should be independent

| Posted on 2015-05-28 | by a guest


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There have been so many interpretations of this poem offered here. I borrowed the verse as the cover for my wedding program. To me it is much simpler than what has been suggested. It is a man/woman who, going out to perform a simple chore, wants to pause and glory in the beauty of nature and invites a friend to share in the experience. I think that Frost would have liked that.
Brian

| Posted on 2014-11-06 | by a guest


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Pasture spring - a source for renewal; clogged, it obstructs physical, spiritual, emotional life. Easy tio unclog when known and then the pure water of life available to writer and to reader even the little calf that must have help beyond Mama to develop. We are in this birth and renewal process together - you come too.

| Posted on 2012-06-29 | by a guest


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this is a good strong peice. it shows his loyalty to nature. and that when he mentions \"you come too\" I think it means he getting old and he needs help. he aslso mentions about the calf \" it\'s so young\" wich also shows he looks at the cow thinking of being young.

| Posted on 2012-04-01 | by a guest


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I think the poem is telling of the simple day to day chores of laid back farm living and the deep appreciation of companionship and bonding. The type of bonding created on a subconscious level, not with the intent of bonding as the obvious reason.

| Posted on 2012-03-27 | by a guest


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The way Frost has composed this poetry is so soothing and refreshing to read! I loved the part were towards the end of stanza he invites the reader to join him at the pasture. The lines sound so earnest and genuine. One of Frost\'s best! - Peace & Happiness to all!

| Posted on 2011-03-16 | by a guest


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I see a love poem in these few stark sentences. The setting is gentle as are the words. An invitation that pulls you along. It is indirect. A simple country life, reflected in the rhythms of nature, the slow passage of time. The company of one\'s love, possibly a friend. You come too! The great gift of someone\'s presence! I can feel the fall air, a slight chill, the light starting to fade. A sidelong glance at your face, the way the light hits it, reassuring myself of your being at my side. And, the life. Simple chores, simple pleasures, simple love.
Spencer of Ballston Lake, NY.

| Posted on 2010-11-25 | by a guest


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i think frost hadnt wrote a good poem in a while and this is all he could come up with

| Posted on 2010-11-01 | by a guest


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I don't think this is about nature, I think this is about Frost recreating himself.

| Posted on 2010-06-24 | by a guest


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I think he is enjoys nature and wants to be with the nature and the nature is the person, or what ever it is he is addressing

| Posted on 2010-04-15 | by a guest


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I personally love this poem. I love how Frost invites the reader to come along with him...very clever! :)

| Posted on 2010-03-24 | by a guest


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I believe "The Pasture" has a young speaker, one who says, "You come, too." The person being addressed has faith that the younger one can do his chores on his own. It's just like the calf with its mother. It wants independence but is still hovering close to the parent. That's why the speaker wants his parent with him. He's still a little unsure on his feet.

| Posted on 2010-03-04 | by a guest


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. hello all i think u all r retarded and have horrible grammar! ahaha u r all dumb asses!!!

| Posted on 2009-05-28 | by a guest


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Frost finds nature very beautiful and wants to share the beauty and joy of nature with the person he is addressing in the poem. He wants to spend time with the person he is addressing by enjoying nature together.

| Posted on 2009-03-30 | by a guest


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.: The Pasture :.
This is about how Frost respects nature and thinks its beautiful. He does his work and is responsible while enjoying the nature around him and He believes its sensitive and venerable
This shows that there are actually peace in a daily life

| Posted on 2008-09-15 | by a guest


.: The Pasture :.

This is about how Frost respects nature and thinks its beautiful. He does his work and is responsible while enjoying the nature around him and He believes its sensitive and venerable

| Posted on 2008-05-20 | by a guest


.: :.

This is about how Frost respects nature and thinks its beautiful. He does his work and is responsible while enjoying the nature around him and He believes its sensitive and venerable

| Posted on 2008-05-20 | by a guest




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