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Putting In The Seed Analysis



Author: Poetry of Robert Frost Type: Poetry Views: 2038

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Mountain Interval1916You come to fetch me from my work to-night

When supper's on the table, and we'll see

If I can leave off burying the white

Soft petals fallen from the apple tree

(Soft petals, yes, but not so barren quite,

Mingled with these, smooth bean and wrinkled pea);

And go along with you ere you lose sight

Of what you came for and become like me,

Slave to a Springtime passion for the earth.

How Love burns through the Putting in the Seed

On through the watching for that early birth

When, just as the soil tarnishes with weed,

The sturdy seedling with arched body comes

Shouldering its way and shedding the earth crumbs.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

.:My Take of \"Putting in the Seed:.
I think the poem is about someone\'s personality. Some of the lines contain opposites like \"smooth bean and wrinkled pea\" that show one living a life with a peronality that blends in with his society, the wrinkled pea, but overcoming it by his true personality shining through,the smooth bean. :)
By the way, this is coming from a 7th grade GT student.

| Posted on 2011-01-03 | by a guest


.: :.

.:My Take of \"Putting in the Seed:.
I think the poem is about someone\'s personality. Some of the lines contain opposites like \"smooth bean and wrinkled pea\" that show one living a life with a peronality that blends in with his society, the wrinkled pea, but overcoming it by his true personality shining through,the smooth bean. :)
By the way, this is coming from a 7th grade GT student.

| Posted on 2011-01-03 | by a guest


.: :.

I was deeply touched this sonnet, as Mother and Lover and as a Slave to the Springtime passion for the Earth. I immediately saw it as an 1.) A literal delight in Nature and Springtime, 2.)An exploration of Creator and Creation and 3.) a precious reproductive metaphor...Springtime’s fruit as the Love Child of nature.
The Poem:
You come to fetch me from my work to-night When supper's on the table,
[Setting the scene in domestic existence. Each are occupied independently, and she has a good reason to go to him. Supper on the table informs us of abundance, of something being prepared and waiting. And here are two instances of work. Both He and She are competent and dedicated to their own worldly pursuits. She is earthy, and has a better connection to the rhythm of plant and animal life (i.e. the healthy female body keeps a strict lunar clock), since on this occasion She stirs Him from his concentration. Who knows, he might have worked on through the night without eating had she not fetched him!]
and we'll see If I can leave off burying
[in poetry, "burying" something can mean death, hiding, or one thing piercing into something else. And He is playful here: “we’ll see…” followed by a visual description of what he intends to bury]
the white soft petals fallen from the apple tree
[Recalling folklore's "fall of man" by Eve's curiosity of this tree...but these petals are white and soft, innocent and fragile. They juxtapose innocence with tabo of a couple’s unplanned romp]
(Soft petals, yes, but not so barren quite,
[There is a softness about the experience, and a significance; They are not barren: neither unproductive, infertile, harsh, or austere.]
Mingled with these, smooth bean and wrinkled pea);
[Quite sensual, overtly sexual and tactile description of petals, bean, pea uniting in the Earth this night]
And go along with you
[a playful warning of what might happen if they…]
ere you lose sight Of what you came for
[get lost in passion, not motivated by sensibility or duty]
and become like me,
[or, become one with me, as my passions become yours. Also, Eve was promised by the serpent she would "become like God" if she consumed forbidden fruit.]
Slave to a Springtime passion for the earth.
[Earth, or fertile soil and nature's womb…Her womb, is his compulsion. Also, the curse of fallen man was that he would have to slave or toil over the earth]
How Love burns through the Putting in the Seed
[Through, meaning “during” and “because of”…A great picture of Love engulfing the Act of natural reproduction...is Frost getting a little transcendental here?]
On through the watching
[and waiting-and how lovely to watch with a burning love]
for that early birth
[if you've ever expected a baby, you recognize impatient desire for the baby to come soon, the same way a Nature's Lover suffers with the heat--How Love burns--of Spring Fever. Early birth might also refer to conception]
When, just as the soil tarnishes with weed,
[just as it all becomes unbearable and ugly]
The sturdy seedling with arched body comes Shouldering its way and shedding the earth crumbs.
[the visual of birth speaks for itself…the Love Child shouldering his way from the Earth, his womb. And you can’t ignore the image of a robust phallus impelling with arched body and determined movement the Earth’s surface/Her womb’s entrance]
-Juliana

| Posted on 2009-03-25 | by a guest


.: :.

I am not sure why everyone is hesitant about commenting on Frost's sexual language. The act of fertilization, "putting in seeds"- all of these instances allude to a sexual love and the physical act of impregnating. The sexual undertones are not there by accident. Robert Frost is treating the traditional sonnet in a different manner.

ps: That poem about Frost and the "youngsters" is embarrassing.

| Posted on 2007-11-18 | by a guest


.: Robert Frost :.

The analyitical context of this poem is just amazing, rob was such a wonderful man in person and this poem is a personal favourite of mine. He expresses his love for nature throughout the poem, he shares this love with me because I love nature too, aswel as him. He has insprired me to get intouch with nature and to stop shaving my pits.

| Posted on 2007-11-13 | by a guest


.: :.

I think both suggestions are quite valid. It just depends how you interpret the piece.

Frost's love for nature is rather apparent in both this and the majority of his other poems. Birches is a definite example of his use of sexual connotations and this poem does appear to be quite sexual, but maybe he was just trying to show his appreciation of nature in a bold way.



| Posted on 2007-09-24 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem is not about Frosts sexual desire for humans as such, but more his love for nature and philosophy about life - as this poem is in Sonnet (14 lines ending in a rhyming couplet) it is traditionally a love poem, not a mistress, not 'sex'. Though there are sexual references throughout, they are not meant in a literal sense, they are just emphasising his passion for nature. He also speaks of his wife forgetting what she came for and becoming like him, entranced by nature - therefore obviously not an act of sex.

| Posted on 2007-09-19 | by a guest


.: Frost the Seer :.

Youngsters amaze me
Their irreverence to life
to suggest that Frost
might covet his wife

Or perhaps in prose
desire another
outside of his clan
to dishonour his Mother

His simplicity in rhyme
is lost on the young
his loving of life
whence his words are from

so leave off from your words
so baned and direct
The man is a legend
who deserves our respect

| Posted on 2007-09-18 | by a guest


.: Student :.

I really dont see any sexual connatations in this poem (try Birches if thats what your looking for). This is first poem of Frosts I read and I think it really defines him and his work. He loves nature and this poem is about his fascination with it, and devotion to it. I know most of his poems have many complex, underlying themes and questions but I think you can take this one at face value.

| Posted on 2007-05-19 | by a guest


.: my view of the poem :.

this poem has a literal meaning of love of nature however, Robert Frost, like in many of his other poems,has a or some kind/s of metaphorical suggestion.
Here the narrator, has a love for nature, and has been described as being 'Slave to a Springtime passion for the earth'. This could also have the sexual connotation from the words 'slave' and 'passion'. And the last few lines describe, as a metaphorical suggestion, the early birth of a child. 'On through the watching for that early birth
When, just as the soil tarnishes with weed,
The sturdy seedling with arched body comes
Shouldering its way and shedding the earth crumbs.'

STUDENT

| Posted on 2007-05-18 | by a guest


.: :.

Frost isn't a poet who writes about sex, it may sound like it has sexual connotations but he was a nature lover, hence, all of his other poems about nature. He had an immense love for nature itself, and can only describe this as 'burning' love.

The poem itself is about the simple pleasures in life that the average person takes for granted.

Frost also mentions the apple here (like in many other of his poems), which represents his greed and passion for nature itself (reference to Eden here, like in Nothing Gold Can Stay and Mending Wall).

| Posted on 2006-05-22 | by Approved Guest


.: Freudian interpretation :.

This poem is a covert portrayal of sex. As follows, "Putting in the seed" is a metaphor for sexual intercourse. In disbelief?

"How Love burns through [sex]
On through the watching for that early birth
When, just as the soil tarnishes with weed,
The [sperm] comes
Shouldering its way and shedding the earth crumbs."

- Daphne

| Posted on 2006-02-19 | by Approved Guest




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