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Hyla Brook Analysis



Author: Poetry of Robert Frost Type: Poetry Views: 1741

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Mountain Interval1916By June our brook's run out of song and speed.

Sought for much after that, it will be found

Either to have gone groping underground

(And taken with it all the Hyla breed

That shouted in the mist a month ago,

Like ghost of sleigh-bells in a ghost of snow)--

Or flourished and come up in jewel-weed,

Weak foliage that is blown upon and bent

Even against the way its waters went.

Its bed is left a faded paper sheet

Of dead leaves stuck together by the heat--

A brook to none but who remember long.

This as it will be seen is other far

Than with brooks taken otherwhere in song.

We love the things we love for what they are.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

June is the month of summer in England, where Frost lived. In all his works about seasons, he has compared spring to birth/re-birth, summer to the decline into fall, and winter with death/end. Here too, the Hyla Brook which used to have speed (flowing water) and song (the sound that moving water makes) is now dried up in the summer. The path of the brook is now covered with "dead leaves stuck together by heat". Nobody can even recognize now that this was the path the brook except for those with memories of it, "A brook to none but who remember long".
This poem could be metaphorically interpreted in many ways. The brook and its life-cycle could be compared to a loved one who has been lost and only the people who have memories of them will notice that anything is missing.

| Posted on 2017-05-27 | by a guest


.: :.

Dispite the fact that the brook has dried up, Frost still loves it for what it is.

| Posted on 2009-06-18 | by a guest


.: hyla brook :.

i think hyla brook is based on the recurring theme throughout alot of
frosts poetry which is the changing of seasons and how this reflects of
human life!(human life hyla breed brook was life brook gone therefore so
has that human life) the brook shows the continuity of not only the cycle
of the seasons but also the cycle of life and how life has to continue. the
fact that its death is in june is noteable in many of frosts poems, spring
is the time for rebirth and renewal where as summer is the decline into
death, the new has come and is now dying off again.
this poem is frost stating we should be happy with the way our lives are
dealt."we love the things we love for what they are"

| Posted on 2008-03-31 | by a guest


.: hyla brook :.

i think hyla brook is based on the recurring theme throughout alot of
frosts poetry which is the changing of seasons and how this reflects of
human life!(human life hyla breed brook was life brook gone therefore so
has that human life) the brook shows the continuity of not only the cycle
of the seasons but also the cycle of life and how life has to continue. the
fact that its death is in june is noteable in many of frosts poems, spring
is the time for rebirth and renewal where as summer is the decline into
death, the new has come and is now dying off again.
this poem is frost stating we should be happy with the way our lives are
dealt."we love the things we love for what they are"

| Posted on 2008-03-31 | by a guest


.: hyla brook :.

I've always read it as an homage to inner beauty, as trite as that sounds. The brook's dried up, but he loves it as much as when it flowed and "shouted in the mist." Perhaps it's a description of sentiments for a once young and vibrant love now grown old - maybe not personal sentiments of the author, but his take on our species.

| Posted on 2007-10-05 | by a guest


.: Last Line :.

The last line of this poem has always bothered me.
"We love the things we love for what they are."
It never has seemed to fit in with the rest of the poem. I know Frost likes to have these meaningful last lines in other poems, but this one seemed different. So I looked into a few things. First I found that someone wrote that Frost didn't like summer. He believed it to be the sign of the end of living things. Fall was just around the corner. I thought that was unusual until I learned that two of his children died at the beginning of summer, one of them only a few months old.
That's when this poem started to make sense to me. His children were gone, but they were still deep inside and "We love the things we love for what they are."

But that's just my guess.

| Posted on 2007-05-30 | by a guest


.: hyla :.

Hyla brook is a poem about love. it relates in many ways to Shakespeares sonnet 130, in this poem Shakespeare talks about all of the faults of his lady, before surmising that it is in spite of these faults that he loves her. The two relate, because in Hyla Brook, Frost talks of a small river, which is quite dear to him. He says 'we love the things we love for what they are' after telling all the faults of what sounds like quite an unpleasant brook. I find this fairly short poem beautiful, because it makes the reader think about themselves, in a way few modern poems do.

| Posted on 2007-05-18 | by a guest


.: a nice shiny analysis :.

ok, basically,the poem is about a brook, which robert frost used to live near. basically, he is saying that no matter what happens to anything, and no matter how much something changes, deep down, it will always be the same and will always be loved. nothing can take away the love one has for a person or an innanimate object.
some of the things to consider, when writing about this poem:
* why he wrote it? => he wrote it because he wanted people to know what he felt about things changing, and his love for things.
* who he wrote it for?? => the "peepers" which are frogs that lived near this brook which he is writing about.
* the poem is intermittent, like the stream.
* the brook changes throughout, showing what robert sees.

| Posted on 2005-11-26 | by Approved Guest




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